CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id caadria2011_035
id caadria2011_035
authors Roudavski, Stanislav and Sonya Parton
year 2011
title Architectural creativity in commercialised cyberspace
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 365-374
summary This paper is written for architectural researchers, practitioners and educators who explore the potentials of networked, location- aware, rich-media computing. Augmented and networked environments open new possibilities in urban and architectural design. At the same time, their adoption by the mainstream is underpinned – and constrained – by commercial motivations. To be able to counter the consumerist interpretation of inhabitable augmented environments, the field of architecture needs to foster a critical discussion of cyberspace. In turn, architectural education needs to provide students with the knowledge necessary to adopt cyberspace for creative purposes. The purpose of this paper is to invite further discussion and experimentation in this area.
keywords Cyberspace, context-aware computing, locative media, ubiquitous computing, architectural creativity
series CAADRIA
email stanislav.roudavski@cantab.net
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id sigradi2011_000
id sigradi2011_000
authors Chiarella, Mauro; Tosello, Maria Elena (eds.)
year 2011
title Sigradi 2011: Augmented Culture
source Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics Graphics / ISBN 13: 978-987-657-679-6] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, 579 p.
summary “Augmented Culture” talks about a combination of interdependent social and technological meanings in a complex, multiple, interactive and interconnected context. It acknowledges that a new social and cultural paradigm is being developed as the old barriers of time, space and language are ruptured and transcended. In our knowledge-based civilization, we inhabit interconnected societies where new relational forms are configured. Additionally, cultural expressions have been qualitatively augmented starting from their integration with information and communication technologies, which have dramatically enhanced not only their creative and reflective processes, but also the realization and construction of cultural objects. In this sense, an “Augmented Culture” compels us to investigate the wide and complex spectrum of the variables that express the interdisciplinary, collective and participative constructions of our present age, so strongly related to visual culture, information culture and interface culture. Thus, we consider it necessary to concentrate, to expand, to spread and to share exploratory, descriptive or explanatory experiences and productions of such phenomena. The attempt is to define a multidimensional theoretical framework that while recognizing today’s state-of-the-art and tendencies, it provides us with a critical viewpoint.
series other
type normal paper
email maritosello@gmail.com
last changed 2011/12/30 17:05

_id 26ce
id 26ce
authors Facklam, Ferdinand; Pecegueiro Curado, Felipe
year 2011
title Data Driven Parametric Design
source PARC Journal - Issue 7
summary In the case study “Live Building” explains a sensory process. The project shows how to collect data,transformed and transported into a shape. Innovation is not only the approach of the draft, but the systematic procedure and the resulting diversity of solutions. The search for the geometric shape and the key to the concept will be answered in detail.
keywords Architecture, Computer Systems, Parametric Design, Sensor Technology, Urban Development
series journal paper
type normal paper
email mail@ferdinandfacklam.ch
more http://www.fec.unicamp.br/~parc/vol2/n7/parc07_facklan.pdf
last changed 2011/10/28 09:01

_id sigradi2011_117
id sigradi2011_117
authors Gonçalves Costa, Luís Gustavo
year 2011
title CRONIDAS: base de dados para confecção de mapas de danos em edificações de interesse histórico-_cultural [CRONIDAS: database for damage maps of historical and cultural interest buildings]
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 56-59
summary This paper fits in the lines of research of the conservation and restoration of historical heritage technology, pathology building, specifically the study of map representations of damage, a fundamental stage of an intervention project in architectural heritage. This damage code incorporates Cronidas database and is available on the collaborative website done and managed by a Content Management System for viewing and download.
series SIGRADI
email luisggcosta@yahoo.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id ecaade2011_116
id ecaade2011_116
authors Koziko_lu, Nilüfer; Kavlak, Emrah
year 2011
title Introducing Architectural Design Foundations Through Algorithmic Design And Experimentations With Materials: A methodology for freshman class in architecture
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.70-76
summary This paper presents a lecture methodology using pattern based and algorithmic design principles for an introductory architectural design course aimed towards students who are not oriented in design practices but in natural sciences. This methodology is built upon eights interconnected steps, starting with analytical pattern extraction from nature - from the unique texture and structure of a plant (seed or fruit) and also from its lifecycle and relation to the existing habitat. The steps include abstract pattern making with the use of software tools and material building of abstracted geometries as standalone structures. Throughout these steps, principles of information design field is demonstrated to improve students’ abilities to analyze visual information.
wos WOS:000335665500007
keywords Pattern; Parametric Design; Design Education; Information Design
series eCAADe
email nkozikoglu@tuspa.net
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id caadria2011_063
id caadria2011_063
authors Lo, Chia-Hui; Ih-Cheng Lai and Teng-Wen Chang
year 2011
title A is B, displacement: Exploring linking patterns within metaphor in the design process
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 663-672
summary Design educators often apply metaphor as a teaching tool to help novice designers in their design process. Richards(1936) defines metaphor as the form “A is B”. The most important operation in metaphor is displacement—the linking process of moving A to B. Linking ideas is the key mechanism in the design process. By linking ideas, a graph-like knowledge represents the individual memories with the nodes and arcs that are the ideas and the links between ideas respectively. Such linking knowledge provides an interesting way to understand the operation of displacement within metaphor. This research applies a computational tool (called DIM) to produce a graph-like knowledge. Protocol analysis is then used to understand how designers organize ideas. The objective of this research was to explore the linking patterns of idea displacement within metaphor in the design process.
keywords Metaphor; displacement; linking ideas; graph-like knowledge; protocol analysis
series CAADRIA
email ihcheng@ms32.hinet.net
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id acadia11_284
id acadia11_284
authors Ogrydziak; Luke
year 2011
title Tetrahedron Cloud
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 284-291
summary The research project, tetrahedron cloud, explores agent-based stochastic behavior as a design tool. It investigates the possibilities for producing volumetric tetrahedral meshes based on the interactions of individual stochastic agents. The research situates itself at the intersection of the visual arts, the physical sciences, and computer science. The basic interest in stochastics comes from the visual arts; the growth simulation approach is borrowed from the natural sciences; and the use of a tetrahedral mesh within C++ comes from computer science. But more generally, the project focuses on architecture’s ongoing engagement with stochastic systems. By embedding extremely specific tendencies within an agent’s behavior, while also allowing for stochastic variation, we can create larger systems that are both in and out of our “control”. This sidesteps the typical limitations of many computational geometry and parametric methods, where there is often an overly deterministic relationship between the input and output of a given system. Such a shift from optimization to behavior inevitably brings up troubling questions of style. Abandoning the search for a “best” solution, or even the articulation of the criteria for such a task, re-opens computational architecture at its deepest levels as a site for design speculation.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email luke@oparch.net
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id acadiaregional2011_019
id acadiaregional2011_019
authors Peters, Troy
year 2011
title Simulation by Design: A Parametric Design Tool for Zero Energy Buildings
source Parametricism (SPC) ACADIA Regional 2011 Conference Proceedings
summary To address the shortcomings of integrating building simulation in architectural design and to make it more appealing to students, a simple interface to Energyplus was created. This interface models a simple rectangular building that is passively heated by direct gain and cooled by ventilation. A simple photovoltaic interface has also been added to supply fan energy. This tool has an OpenGL modeler for visualization and uses Energyplus for calculations. The interface will run a full year simulation and graph the results. The results are reported in a yearly graph that shows the outdoor and indoor temperature. The indoor temperature range is based on adaptive comfort level. The interface was tested and used in an introductory design studio in order to comply with the 2010 imperative. The students simulated a simple box and changed the buildings parameters until the building fell within the adaptive comfort zone for most of the year. The climate simulated was Chicago, IL. Using these parameters the students then designed the building. The resulting designs show that even though the students were restricted in parameters, such as window percentage, they were still able to creatively design unique buildings that use zero to negative net energy for heating and cooling in a climate such as Chicago.
series ACADIA
last changed 2011/07/08 09:17

_id caadria2011_038
id caadria2011_038
authors Pourmohamadi, Morteza; John S. Gero and Robert Saunders
year 2011
title CAD software as customisation tools: Using FBS protocol coding scheme to understand the behaviour of mass customisers
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 399-408
summary This paper explores the use of CAD software as tools in mass customisation systems and discusses using protocol study methods to analyse the interactions between customers and customisation tools. Current uses of CAD software as customisation tools will be presented. The use of the Function-Behaviour-Structure coding scheme to analyse protocols from customisation sessions is discussed. A protocol from Puma footwear customisation is analysed using the LINKOgrapher software and the results presented. The paper concludes with a discussion on the utility of computational support tools to study designers/customers utilizing CAD tools for mass customisation.
keywords Mass customisation; CAD; customisation toolkits; design protocol study; FBS coding
series CAADRIA
email morteza@pourmohamadi.net
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id acadia11_152
id acadia11_152
authors Rael, Ronald; San Fratello, Virginia
year 2011
title Developing Concrete Polymer Building Components for 3D Printing
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 152-157
summary The creation of building components that can be seen as sustainable, inexpensive, stronger, recyclable, customizable and perhaps even reparable to the environment is an urgent, and critical focus of architectural research. In the U.S. alone, the construction industry produced 143.5 million tons of building-related construction and demolition debris in 2008, and buildings, in their consumption of energy produce more greenhouse gasses than automobiles or industry.Because the inherent nature of 3D printing opens new possibilities for shaping materials, the process will reshape the way we think about architectural building components. Digital materiality, a term coined by Italian and Swiss architects Fabio Gramazio and Matthias Kohler, describes materiality increasingly enriched with digital characteristics where data, material, programming and construction are interwoven (Gramazio and Kohler, 2008). The research aspires towards this classification through the use of parametric modeling tools, analytic software and quantitative and qualitative analysis. Rapid prototyping, which is the automatic construction of physical objects using additive manufacturing technology, typically employs materials intended for the immediate analysis of form, scale, and tactility. Rarely do the materials used in this process have any long-term value, nor does the process - except in rare cases with expensive metal prototyping - have the ability to create actual and sustainable working products. This research intends to alter this state of affairs by developing methods for 3D printing using concrete for the production of long-lasting performance-based components.
series ACADIA
type work in progress
email r@el.net
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id caadria2011_055
id caadria2011_055
authors Roudavski, Stanislav and Anne-Marie Walsh
year 2011
title The Headspace project: Computer-assisted fabrication as an introduction to digital architectural design
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 579-588
summary Written for architectural educators, this paper discusses whether digital fabrication can be usefully employed in early architectural education. The paper uses examples from a course that aims to introduce the fundamentals of digital architectural design to first-year students. To achieve this, the course integrates digital fabrication as the core element of the production workflow. Challenging but rewarding, early adoption of digital fabrication exposes students to the processand material-based thinking of contemporary architecture at a time when they form lasting attitudes to designing.
keywords Architectural education; digital fabrication; digital architectural design; creativity; process-based designing; performancebased designing
series CAADRIA
email stanislav@stanislavroudavski.net
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id acadia11_360
id acadia11_360
authors Sprecher, Aaron
year 2011
title Homeorrhetism: Few Observations on the Nature of Experimentation in Computational Architecture
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 360-361
summary From the point of view of computation, concerns over the nature of an experiment raise questions that often belong to a deductive reasoning; in other words the possibility to understand the world in terms of established principles and theories: What kind of information should be extracted from our environment? What would be a comprehensive system of information that reflects the complexity of our world? How can one assure objectivity in the building of a model? In contrast, the experimental context of architecture calls for a different set of questions: How can a model convey the meaning of our world? What kind of effect is the model supposed to create? Why a particular model is more likely to express the condition of a culture versus another? Here, concerns over the inductive nature of the experimental protocol prevail, or in other words, the questions do not call for fixed principles but a range of possibilities often related to the cultural, social and even political sensitivity of the experimenter. These distinctive sets of questions therefore range from deductive to inductive experimental approaches. Most importantly, they express the essence of the now established field of computational architecture and its capability to propel a confluence of knowledge; a form of transdisciplinarity that oscillates between architecture’s core knowledge and its disciplinal periphery. While both deductive and inductive assumptions are pre-requisite to operative experimentations, the question remains as to the principles managing their confluence.
series ACADIA
type moderator overview
email Aaron@o-s-a.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id caadria2011_019
id caadria2011_019
authors Lee, Ju Hyun and Mi Jeong Kim
year 2011
title A context immersion of mixed reality at a new stage
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 199-208
summary This paper presents a novel approach to the potential of mixed reality embodied in smart phones and ubiquitous environments. We analyzed the related works to the concept of context and mobile computing and then investigated into leading companies by interviewing senior manages of the mixed reality (MR) projects in Korea. As a result, the concept of context immersion is proposed for describing the various context relationships among the real locations, objects and persons. By considering the MR environments as a converged world, this paper characterizes the context immersion as the combination of the time & location-based, object-based and user-based contexts. Through the context immersion, users can be connected to the real life, not limited to the imagery world, thus experiencing strong immersion in the MR environments. At the end, we present the development direction for the future with a focus on the MR contents rather than the technical aspects.
keywords Context Immersion; Mixed Reality; Augmented Reality; Ubiquitous Computing; Mobile Computing
series CAADRIA
email juhyun.lee@newcastle.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id cf2011_p093
id cf2011_p093
authors Nguyen, Thi Lan Truc; Tan Beng Kiang
year 2011
title Understanding Shared Space for Informal Interaction among Geographically Distributed Teams
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 41-54.
summary In a design project, much creative work is done in teams, thus requires spaces for collaborative works such as conference rooms, project rooms and chill-out areas. These spaces are designed to provide an atmosphere conducive to discussion and communication ranging from formal meetings to informal communication. According to Kraut et al (E.Kraut et al., 1990), informal communication is an important factor for the success of collaboration and is defined as “conversations take place at the time, with the participants, and about the topics at hand. It often occurs spontaneously by chance and in face-to-face manner. As shown in many research, much of good and creative ideas originate from impromptu meeting rather than in a formal meeting (Grajewski, 1993, A.Isaacs et al., 1997). Therefore, the places for informal communication are taken into account in workplace design and scattered throughout the building in order to stimulate face-to-face interaction, especially serendipitous communication among different groups across disciplines such as engineering, technology, design and so forth. Nowadays, team members of a project are not confined to people working in one location but are spread widely with geographically distributed collaborations. Being separated by long physical distance, informal interaction by chance is impossible since people are not co-located. In order to maintain the benefit of informal interaction in collaborative works, research endeavor has developed a variety ways to shorten the physical distance and bring people together in one shared space. Technologies to support informal interaction at a distance include video-based technologies, virtual reality technologies, location-based technologies and ubiquitous technologies. These technologies facilitate people to stay aware of other’s availability in distributed environment and to socialize and interact in a multi-users virtual environment. Each type of applications supports informal interaction through the employed technology characteristics. One of the conditions for promoting frequent and impromptu face-to-face communication is being co-located in one space in which the spatial settings play as catalyst to increase the likelihood for frequent encounter. Therefore, this paper analyses the degree to which sense of shared space is supported by these technical approaches. This analysis helps to identify the trade-off features of each shared space technology and its current problems. A taxonomy of shared space is introduced based on three types of shared space technologies for supporting informal interaction. These types are named as shared physical environments, collaborative virtual environments and mixed reality environments and are ordered increasingly towards the reality of sense of shared space. Based on the problem learnt from other technical approaches and the nature of informal interaction, this paper proposes physical-virtual shared space for supporting intended and opportunistic informal interaction. The shared space will be created by augmenting a 3D collaborative virtual environment (CVE) with real world scene at the virtual world side; and blending the CVE scene to the physical settings at the real world side. Given this, the two spaces are merged into one global structure. With augmented view of the real world, geographically distributed co-workers who populate the 3D CVE are facilitated to encounter and interact with their real world counterparts in a meaningful and natural manner.
keywords shared space, collaborative virtual environment, informal interaction, intended interaction, opportunistic interaction
series CAAD Futures
email g0800518@nus.edu.sg
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2011_077
id ecaade2011_077
authors Ettlinger, Or
year 2011
title The Perceptual, the Virtual, and the Real: On the experience of place in the digital age
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.925-932
summary Since the dawn of philosophical thought man has questioned the validity of his experience of the world around him: Is the world just as we perceive it to be, or does its true essence lie beyond our reach? In our own time, technological, social, and economic developments have made such philosophical concerns more relevant to our everyday lives than ever before. However, the available terminology for discussing such matters is often too limited to fully capture their nature. This paper proposes a consistent terminology for the discussion of such matters and suggests a model of the different aspects from which they are comprised. This terminology will be applied to, as well as presented through, issues that are pertinent to architectural theory, to the experience of places, and to the intangible sense of place which digital phenomena can sometimes provide.
wos WOS:000335665500106
keywords Architectural theory; media theory; perceptual; virtual; real
series eCAADe
email or.ettlinger@fa.uni-lj.si
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id sigradi2011_092
id sigradi2011_092
authors Hemmerling, Marco
year 2011
title Informed Material
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 339-342
summary Next to the possibilities of digital form-finding strategies, parametric design and computational visualization techniques, which lead to an increasing virtualization of our society - rapid technologies allow today for the direct translation of the digital model into the physical world. As a result of this process the experience of digital realities, driven by virtual environment gets an interesting shift back to the physical world. Against this background the paper points out that it is a question of design to define contemporary and intended matters, processes and strategies of interaction, in other words: to inform the design.
keywords Rapid Prototyping; Materialization; Perception; Digital Design Tools; Human-Centered Design
series SIGRADI
email marco.hemmerling@hs-owl.de
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id sigradi2011_382
id sigradi2011_382
authors Pimentel, Diego; Causa, Emiliano; Cataldi, Mariano; Braida, Santiago
year 2011
title Mundo Circular. Ejemplo low-tech de realidad aumentada e interfaces tangibles [Mundo Circular. Tangible interfaces and low-techaugmentedreality]
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 294-297
summary This work is about the relationship between socio-political matters and communications aspects in every country around the world. The data collected from ITU (International Telecommunication Union), UN, UNESCO, FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization), WTO and World Bank, show contrast among countries with more available resourcesand those who hasn't. The interface use augmented reality patterns to allow the user know the differences between the values expressed by each country, in a visual and intuitive way.
series SIGRADI
email diegopimentel@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id eaea2009_piga
id eaea2009_piga
authors Piga, Barbara E.A.
year 2011
title The Urban Simulation and Projects Evaluation Laboratory at the Politecnico di Milano: An Educational and Research Facility
source Projecting Spaces [Proceedings of the 9th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 978-3-942411-31-8 ], pp. 115-120
summary At the beginning of 2007 an Italian Urban Simulation Laboratory was founded at the Politecnico di Milano. The laboratory, coordinated by prof. Fausto Curti, has been developed thanks to the one year presence of the visiting professor Peter Bosselmann, director of the Environmental Simulation Laboratory at the University of California at Berkeley. The laboratory has an interdisciplinary approach and a threefold mission: experiment, using the laboratory setting to study urban projects at different scales; communicate, aiding public communication by making urban projects understandable to everyone; integrate and innovate, working on different kind of simulations techniques in an integrated way. In its initial experience the laboratory is primarily a didactic and research facility. Students can join the work and participate actively to the research. Until now about 40 students have worked with us, more than a half were foreign students from all over the world. The majority of the students did an internship of about 150 (three-year degree) or 300 (master degree) hours and some of them have continued working after this period developing a thesis. At the moment the case study, used as a pilot research, is about the Porta Nuova project at the Garibaldi- Repubblica area in Milan. The 300.000 mq of the total area and its well served central position make this place strategic for Milan. In this area the adopted urban transformation plan is creating a new business center that affects redevelopment projects, new infrastructures, and a park. The overall project will overhanging the surroundings city center with some of the highest buildings of its skyline. The importance of the site and the dimension of the project make this case significant to test the use of simulation for supporting evaluations about morphological aspects, comfort conditions, visual impacts, and other aspects that directly influence the quality of the new urban spaces. We are now applying different simulation methodologies in order to better understand the peculiar usefulness of each kind as a tool to support evaluation. As any kind has its own limits we work with different typologies at the same time. We are working with 1:500 scale physical model of a 1 km square of the area and different kind of static and dynamic simulations. We developed, with an external office, a micro-car to move a micro-camera in the maquette. We use this equipment to better explain the project implications to the students by producing subjective shot videos or showing a walk in real-time. To reproduce in a better way some relevant walks through the transformed site we have also produced some videos made of a superimposition of the real existing context and the virtual projects. To do this we used a rendered video of the project superimposed to the filmed promenade of the today condition, previously recorded using steadycam. A lot of static simulations has been employed to better understand the new city configuration from some representative points of view, as for example the roof of the Duomo cathedral. We are now developing some other kinds of analysis such as shadows impact; this is done by using a 1:1000 scale maquette in the Heliodon, but also with some digital tools. In the next future a work with the wind tunnel will help to understand some other comfort implications of the project at the micro-urban scale. The multilayer approach is the main aim of the laboratory and is an important tool to clarify the multidimensional project impacts to the students. In this way the laboratory can be a learning tool, it can stimulate the project process and support decision-making while improving the knowledge about the correct use of simulations for evaluating the cumulative implications of the proposed urban processes.
series other
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2011/03/04 07:45

_id acadiaregional2011_009
id acadiaregional2011_009
authors Esquivel, Gabriel; Ryan Collier
year 2011
title A Swell Project: Between Parametrics and Fabrication
source Parametricism (SPC) ACADIA Regional 2011 Conference Proceedings
summary As a case study, Swell serves as: 1) an investigation into architectural ornamentation using a contemporary framework, as directed through specific modes of research, 2) a study in fabrication materials and methods, especially through the realization of form, and 3) as a pedagogical tool, loosely assembled through real and virtual space. This essay will focus mainly on the fabrication methods in terms of why and the pedagogical research initiatives and reactions that went into the design of Swell. The project was conceived through a summer studio which was formed to investigate tools and methods available at the Texas A&M Architecture Ranch and to further the local pedagogical direction toward fabrication in architectural design at Texas A&M University as a whole. That is to say, there was no specific agenda toward parametrics, form, research, technology, or the like. At the same time, as the research continued, certain decisions were cast in terms of technology, sensibility, site, etc. informed by research, iterative processes, or parametric evaluation that ultimately formed the project as it exists today.
series ACADIA
last changed 2011/07/08 09:17

_id caadria2011_028
id caadria2011_028
authors Lesage, Annemarie and Tomás Dorta
year 2011
title Two conceptual design tools and an immersive experience: Beyond the pragmatic-pleasurable split in UX
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 291-300
summary In a recent study, we compared two conceptual design tools supporting collaboration, a whiteboard software accessed through Internet, and a hybrid immersive system, the Hybrid Ideation Space (HIS). The result of the study appeared to favour the HIS because of its immersive qualities. In this paper, we seek possible explanations as to why immersion delivered a better experience, by looking at the mental workload in relationship to the experience. For the workload we rely on Wickens’ four-dimensional multiple resource model, specifically processing codes (verbal/spatial) and visual channels; and for the experience, Csikszentmihalyi’s concept of flow and our own concept of Design Flow. The designers seemed to be responding to different styles of information processing required of them by each tool, one being more experiential and the other requiring a heavier mental workload. Insight in the cognitive underpinning of a strictly pragmatic immersive experience suggests that UX has also to do with how the information is received and processed by users, without isolating the functional from the rest of the experience.
keywords User experience; immersion; flow; mental workload; Hybrid Ideation Space
series CAADRIA
email annemarie.lesage@umontreal.ca
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

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