CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 537

_id ijac201310105
id ijac201310105
authors Agkathidis, Asterios and Andre_ Brown
year 2013
title Tree-Structure Canopy:A Case Study in Design and Fabrication of Complex Steel Structures using Digital Tools
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 11 - no. 1, 87-104
summary This paper describes and reflects on the design and manufacturing process of the Tree-Structure canopy for the WestendGate Tower in Frankfurt upon Main, completed early 2011.The project investigated fabrication and assembly principles of complex steel structures as well as the integration of contemporary computational design, engineering, optimization and simulation techniques in a collaborative design approach. This paper focuses on the notion of modular standardization as opposed to non standard customized components. It also engages with issues relating to digital production tools and their impact on construction cost, material performance and tolerances. In addition it examines the reconfiguration of liability during a planning and construction process, an aspect which can be strongly determined by fabrication companies rather than the architect or designer.This paper is written as a reflection on the complete building process when contemporary digital tools are used from design through to fabrication. It studies both the generation of the steel structure as well the ETFE cushion skin. It reports on a collaborative project, where the main author was responsible for the canopies design, parameterization, digitalization and fabrication, as well as for the dissemination of the outcomes and findings during the design and realization process.As such it represents an example of research through design in a contemporary and evolving field.The canopy received a design award by the Hellenic Architecture Association.
series journal
last changed 2013/08/19 14:29

_id ijac20119403
id ijac20119403
authors Davis,Daniel; Jane Burry and Mark Burry
year 2011
title Understanding visual scripts: Improving collaboration through modular programming
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 9 - no. 4, 361-375
summary Modularisation is a well-known method of reducing code complexity, yet architects are unlikely to modularise their visual scripts. In this paper the impact that modules used in visual scripts have on the architectural design process is investigated with regard to legibility, collaboration, reuse and design modification.Through a series of thinking-aloud interviews, and through the collaborative design and construction of the parametric Dermoid pavilion, modules are found to impact the culture of collaborative design in architecture through relatively minor alterations to how architects organise visual scripts.
series journal
last changed 2012/02/14 08:02

_id caadria2011_009
id caadria2011_009
authors Anderson, Jonathon and Ming Tang
year 2011
title Form follows parameters: Parametric modeling for fabrication and manufacturing processes
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 91-100
summary As the architectural field continues to explore the possibilities of parametric design it is important to understand that architectural computation has evolved from representations to simulation and evaluation. This paper explores the digital processes of parametric scripting as a way to generate architectural artefacts that can be realized in the physical landscape through various digital fabrication and industrial manufacturing techniques. This paper will highlight the important discoveries of the geometries and the implications the script has on the construction processes. One benefit of using parametric modelling as a component to the manufacturing pipeline is being able to explore several design iterations in the digital realm before ever realizing them in the physical landscape. Furthermore, parametric modelling allows users to control the production documentation and precision needed to manufacture. As a result, the design pipeline presented in this paper seeks to eliminate the construction processes that hinder the physical act of making architecture.
keywords Manufacturing process; parametric modelling; 3D printing, plastic casting; mould making
series CAADRIA
email jrander6@uncg.edu.edu
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id ecaade2011_145
id ecaade2011_145
authors Araújo, Leandro; Andrés, Roberto
year 2011
title BIM.BON . A BIM system for architectural practice in Brazil
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.439-443
wos WOS:000335665500050
summary This article discusses the difficulties faced by the BIM (Building Information Modeling) systems to be widely adopted among most part of architecture and engineering professionals in Brazil. A revision of the issue and investigation of possibilities for improving the practice of architecture were made by creating a new model of BIM software addressed to a wider audience. It lists the main critical points in the usability of BIM software, based on a survey made with 300 professionals. The analysis is followed by a study of a new BIM software that could reach a wider audience of architects by implementing a tool that directly links the users to the construction materials market, also including a tool for easy budgetary calculations.
keywords BIM Software; Architectural design; Architecture in Brazil; ICT; Collaborative design
series eCAADe
email leandro@superficie.org
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id cf2011_p127
id cf2011_p127
authors Benros, Deborah; Granadeiro Vasco, Duarte Jose, Knight Terry
year 2011
title Integrated Design and Building System for the Provision of Customized Housing: the Case of Post-Earthquake Haiti
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 247-264.
summary The paper proposes integrated design and building systems for the provision of sustainable customized housing. It advances previous work by applying a methodology to generate these systems from vernacular precedents. The methodology is based on the use of shape grammars to derive and encode a contemporary system from the precedents. The combined set of rules can be applied to generate housing solutions tailored to specific user and site contexts. The provision of housing to shelter the population affected by the 2010 Haiti earthquake illustrates the application of the methodology. A computer implementation is currently under development in C# using the BIM platform provided by Revit. The world experiences a sharp increase in population and a strong urbanization process. These phenomena call for the development of effective means to solve the resulting housing deficit. The response of the informal sector to the problem, which relies mainly on handcrafted processes, has resulted in an increase of urban slums in many of the big cities, which lack sanitary and spatial conditions. The formal sector has produced monotonous environments based on the idea of mass production that one size fits all, which fails to meet individual and cultural needs. We propose an alternative approach in which mass customization is used to produce planed environments that possess qualities found in historical settlements. Mass customization, a new paradigm emerging due to the technological developments of the last decades, combines the economy of scale of mass production and the aesthetics and functional qualities of customization. Mass customization of housing is defined as the provision of houses that respond to the context in which they are built. The conceptual model for the mass customization of housing used departs from the idea of a housing type, which is the combined result of three systems (Habraken, 1988) -- spatial, building system, and stylistic -- and it includes a design system, a production system, and a computer system (Duarte, 2001). In previous work, this conceptual model was tested by developing a computer system for existing design and building systems (Benr__s and Duarte, 2009). The current work advances it by developing new and original design, building, and computer systems for a particular context. The urgent need to build fast in the aftermath of catastrophes quite often overrides any cultural concerns. As a result, the shelters provided in such circumstances are indistinct and impersonal. However, taking individual and cultural aspects into account might lead to a better identification of the population with their new environment, thereby minimizing the rupture caused in their lives. As the methodology to develop new housing systems is based on the idea of architectural precedents, choosing existing vernacular housing as a precedent permits the incorporation of cultural aspects and facilitates an identification of people with the new housing. In the Haiti case study, we chose as a precedent a housetype called “gingerbread houses”, which includes a wide range of houses from wealthy to very humble ones. Although the proposed design system was inspired by these houses, it was decided to adopt a contemporary take. The methodology to devise the new type was based on two ideas: precedents and transformations in design. In architecture, the use of precedents provides designers with typical solutions for particular problems and it constitutes a departing point for a new design. In our case, the precedent is an existing housetype. It has been shown (Duarte, 2001) that a particular housetype can be encoded by a shape grammar (Stiny, 1980) forming a design system. Studies in shape grammars have shown that the evolution of one style into another can be described as the transformation of one shape grammar into another (Knight, 1994). The used methodology departs takes off from these ideas and it comprises the following steps (Duarte, 2008): (1) Selection of precedents, (2) Derivation of an archetype; (3) Listing of rules; (4) Derivation of designs; (5) Cataloguing of solutions; (6) Derivation of tailored solution.
keywords Mass customization, Housing, Building system, Sustainable construction, Life cycle energy consumption, Shape grammar
series CAAD Futures
email deborahbenros@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2011_136
id ecaade2011_136
authors Bohnenberger, Sascha; de Rycke, Klaas; Weilandt, Agnes
year 2011
title Lattice Spaces: Form optimisation throgh customization of non developable 3d wood surfaces
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.751-758
wos WOS:000335665500087
summary This paper discusses a collaborative project by RDAI architects, Bollinger+Grohmann and the timber construction company Holzbau Amann. The project is located in a former swimming pool in Paris and it is part of the new interior of a flagship store of the French fashion label Hermes. In late 2009, Rena Duma Architects, asked Bollinger+Grohmann to collaborate as structural engineers on a challenging design proposal within a very short timeframe. Three wooden lattice structures, the so-called “bulle” and one monumental staircase with a similar design approach characterize the interior of the new flagship store. The lattice structures are dividing the basement into different retail spaces. They vary in height (8-9 m) and diameter (8-12 m) and have a free-form shaped wicker basket appearance. Wood was the chosen material for these structures to strengthen the idea of the wickerbaskets and to create an interior space with a sustainable and innovative material.
keywords Digital production; parametric design; mass customization; wood; digital crafting
series eCAADe
email sbohnenberger@bollinger-grohmann.de
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id acadia11_138
id acadia11_138
authors Buell, Samantha; Shaban, Ryan; Corte, Daniel; Beorkrem, Christopher
year 2011
title Zero-waste, Flat Pack Truss Work: An Investigation of Responsive Structuralism
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 138-143
summary The direct and rapid connections between scripting, modeling and prototyping allow for investigations of computation in fabrication. The manipulation of planar materials with two-dimensional CNC cuts can easily create complex and varied forms, volumes, and surfaces. However, the bulk of research on folding using CNC fabrication tools is focused upon surfaces, self-supporting walls and shell structures, which do not integrate well into more conventional building construction models.This paper attempts to explain the potential for using folding methodologies to develop structural members through a design-build process. Conventional building practice consists of the assembly of off-the-shelf parts. Many times, the plinth, skeleton, and skin are independently designed and fabricated, integrating multiple industries. Using this method of construction as an operative status quo, this investigation focused on a single structural component: the truss. A truss is defined as: “A triangulated arrangement of structural members that reduces nonaxial external forces to a set of axial forces in its members.” (Allen and Iano 2004)Using folding methodologies and sheet steel to create a truss, this design investigation employed a recyclable and prolific building material to redefine the fabrication of a conventional structural member. The potential for using digital design and two-dimensional CNC fabrication tools in the design of a foldable truss from sheet steel is viable in the creation of a flat-packed, minimal waste structural member that can adapt to a variety of aesthetic and structural conditions. Applying new methods to a component of the conventional ‘kit of parts’ allowed for a novel investigation that recombines zero waste goals, flat-packing potential, structural expression and computational processes.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email srbuell2@gmail.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id acadia11_308
id acadia11_308
authors Celento, David; Harriss, Edmund
year 2011
title Potentials for Multi-dimensional Tessellations in Architectural Applications
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 308-313
summary Computationally, there exist significant potentials to integrate periodic (repeating) and aperiodic (non-repeating) tessellations in architectural applications. While exploration of two-dimensional and three-dimensional tessellations appear in historically significant works, today, higher-dimensional tessellations are capable of being generated computationally which may be useful in various architectural applications. This paper, a collaboration between an architect and mathematician, explores these processes and potentials. Insights will be offered into this early stage exploration regarding the creation and use of higher-dimensional geometries for architectural applications—such as patterning, volumetric descriptions, and modular assemblages.
series ACADIA
type work in progress
email dcelento@gmail.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id cf2011_p165
id cf2011_p165
authors Chasznar, Andre
year 2011
title Navigating Complex Models in Collaborative Work for (Sustainably) Integrated Design
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 619-636.
summary Increasingly intensive use of computational techniques such as parametric-associative modeling, algorithmic design, performance simulations and generative design in architecture, engineering and construction are leading to increasingly large and complex 3D building models which in turn require increasingly powerful techniques in order to be manipulated and interpreted effectively. Further complexities are of course due also to the multi-disciplinary nature of building projects, in which there can be significant variation and even conflict among the aims of architects, engineers and builders, as well as owners, occupants and other stakeholders in the process. Effective use of model information depends to a large extent on sense-making, which can in some ways be helped but also hindered by schemes for organizing the information contained. Common techniques such as layering, labeling (aka ‘tagging’) and assignment of various other attributes to model objects have significant limitations – especially those arising from general problems of language, ontology and standardization, as well as but distinct from issues of interoperability – both with respect to locating the desired items in a 3D building model and also with respect to displaying the objects in informative ways which effectively assist collaborative design and decision-making. Sustainable design in particular is an area generally requiring a high level of inter-disciplinary collaboration to achieve highly integrated designs which make multiple use of the elements and systems incorporated (though integrated design may also be pursued without explicit aims of sustainability). The proposed paper describes ongoing research concerning alternatives to the currently common techniques for locating and displaying information in 3D building models in support of sense-making to promote collaborative and integrated design. These alternatives comprise on the one hand interactive geometric-content-based methods for search and classification of model objects – as an alternative or complement to common assigned-attribute-based methods – and on the other hand visual analytic techniques – in contrast to existing, relatively static tabular and "physical" views – which can help to increase the informativeness of the geometric data within the model, as well as the non-geometric data that is attached to geometric objects (e.g. as in the cases of BIM and various types of CAE performance simulations). Tests undertaken with architects and engineers in practice and academia to evaluate the proposed methods are also described. Finally conclusions are drawn regarding these methods’ positive present performance and some of their shortcomings, as well as indicating directions for future research concerning the methods’ refinement and extension to help 3D building models become more effective components of the design process than they are at present, both with respect to these models’ present levels of complexity and especially with respect to their anticipated increasing complexity in future.
keywords CAD/CAE/BIM, content-based search, visual analytics
series CAAD Futures
email a.t.chaszar@tudelft.nl
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id acadia11_234
id acadia11_234
authors Chok, Kermin
year 2011
title Progressive Spheres of Innovation: Efficiency, communication and collaboration
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 234-241
summary Over the last few years, a large majority of construction work has moved overseas. In response to this, our engineering practice has been involved in a large number of Asian and Middle East design competitions, usually executed in a compressed timeframe. Building codes usually include very specific requirements regarding the lateral performance of a building under seismic and wind loads. This is especially true in China. Our structural engineering practice has thus developed a variety of digital tools customized to building code requirements, in order to provide relevant structural feedback in an appropriate design time frame. The paper will discuss our recent digital design work in the context of building code requirements and information sharing. Our innovations have centered on three progressive spheres of innovation: internal efficiency, communication and collaboration. We propose that only with closer and more transparent collaboration will the building industry be effective and efficient in meeting clients’ needs. However, without first addressing a firm’s internal capabilities of efficiency and communication, the firm will be unable to effectively participate in the collaborative process. This paper begins by discussing various custom Rhino-Grasshopper components to facilitate our internal design process. We then touch on the communication realm discussing work in lowering the barriers for information sharing. Lastly, we explore the necessary shifts in thinking required to move beyond linear design exploration and the exciting opportunity to deliver truly innovative design solutions.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email kermin.chok@gmail.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id sigradi2011_391
id sigradi2011_391
authors Claro, Ana Julia
year 2011
title Herramientas digitales para la ideación y desarrollo de formas complejas [Digital tools for conception and development of complex forms]
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 197-200
summary The aim of this investigation is to study the connection between geometry and architecture, nowadays strongly stimulated by the use of digital tools, design and fabrication. At the same time, it expresses the need to develop interdisciplinary processes when analyzing the conception and construction of complex forms in the architecture, focusing on creating a computer application in charge of the unfold of NURBS surfaces, carried out for this study.
series SIGRADI
email anajuliaclaro@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id cf2011_p051
id cf2011_p051
authors Cote, Pierre; Mohamed-Ahmed Ashraf, Tremblay Sebastien
year 2011
title A Quantitative Method to Compare the Impact of Design Mediums on the Architectural Ideation Process.
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 539-556.
summary If we compare the architectural design process to a black box system, we can assume that we now know quite well both inputs and outputs of the system. Indeed, everything about the early project either feasibility studies, programming, context integration, site analysis (urban, rural or natural), as well as the integration of participants in a collaborative process can all be considered to initiate and sustain the architectural design and ideation process. Similarly, outputs from that process are also, and to some extent, well known and identifiable. We are referring here, among others, to the project representations or even to the concrete building construction and its post-evaluation. But what about the black box itself that produces the ideation. This is the question that attempts to answer the research. Currently, very few research works linger to identify how the human brain accomplishes those tasks; how to identify the cognitive functions that are playing this role; to what extent they operate and complement each other, and among other things, whether there possibly a chain of causality between these functions. Therefore, this study proposes to define a model that reflects the activity of the black box based on the cognitive activity of the human brain. From an extensive literature review, two cognitive functions have been identified and are investigated to account for some of the complex cognitive activity that occurs during a design process, namely the mental workload and mental imagery. These two variables are measured quantitatively in the context of real design task. Essentially, the mental load is measured using a Bakan's test and the mental imagery with eyes tracking. The statistical software G-Power was used to identify the necessary subject number to obtain for significant variance and correlation result analysis. Thus, in the context of an exploratory research, to ensure effective sample of 0.25 and a statistical power of 0.80, 32 participants are needed. All these participants are students from 3rd, 4th or 5th grade in architecture. They are also very familiar with the architectural design process and the design mediums used, i.e., analog model, freehand drawing and CAD software, SketchUp. In three experimental sessions, participants were asked to design three different projects, namely, a bus shelter, a recycling station and a public toilet. These projects were selected and defined for their complexity similarity, taking into account the available time of 22 minutes, using all three mediums of design, and this in a randomly manner to avoid the order effect. To analyze the two cognitive functions (mental load and mental imagery), two instruments are used. Mental imagery is measured using eye movement tracking with monitoring and quantitative analysis of scan paths and the resulting number and duration of participant eye fixations (Johansson et al, 2005). The mental workload is measured using the performance of a modality hearing secondary task inspired by Bakan'sworks (Bakan et al.; 1963). Each of these three experimental sessions, lasting 90 minutes, was composed of two phases: 1. After calibrating the glasses for eye movement, the subject had to exercise freely for 3 minutes while wearing the glasses and headphones (Bakan task) to get use to the wearing hardware. Then, after reading the guidelines and criteria for the design project (± 5 minutes), he had 22 minutes to execute the design task on a drawing table allowing an upright posture. Once the task is completed, the subject had to take the NASA TLX Test, on the assessment of mental load (± 5 minutes) and a written post-experimental questionnaire on his impressions of the experiment (± 10 minutes). 2. After a break of 5-10 minutes, the participant answered a psychometric test, which is different for each session. These tests (± 20 minutes) are administered in the same order to each participant. Thus, in the first experimental session, the subject had to take the psychometric test from Ekstrom et al. (1978), on spatial performance (Factor-Referenced Cognitive Tests Kit). During the second session, the cognitive style is evaluated using Oltman's test (1971). Finally, in the third and final session, participant creativity is evaluated using Delis-Kaplan test (D-KEFS), Delis et al. (2001). Thus, this study will present the first results of quantitative measures to establish and validate the proposed model. Furthermore, the paper will also discuss the relevance of the proposed approach, considering that currently teaching of ideation in ours schools of architecture in North America is essentially done in a holistic manner through the architectural project.
keywords design, ideation process, mental workload, mental imagery, quantitative mesure
series CAAD Futures
email pierre.cote@arc.ulaval.ca
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2012_261
id ecaade2012_261
authors Feringa, Jelle; Sondergaard, Asbjorn
year 2012
title Design and Fabrication of Topologically Optimized Structures; An Integral Approach - A Close Coupling Form Generation and Fabrication
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 495-500
wos WOS:000330320600052
summary Integral structural optimization and fabrication seeks the synthesis of two original approaches; that of topological optimization (TO) and robotic hotwire cutting (HWC) (Mcgee 2011). TO allows for the reduction of up to 70% of the volume of concrete to support a given structure (Sondergaard & Dombernowsky 2011). A strength of the method is that it allows to come up with structural designs that lie beyond the grasp of traditional means of design. A design space is a discretized volume, delimiting where the optimization will take place. The number of cells used to discretize the design space thus sets the resolution of the TO. While the approach of the application of TO as a constitutive design tool centers on structural aspects in the design phase (Xie 2010), the outcome of this process are structures that cannot be realized within a conventional budget. As such the ensuing design is optimal in a narrow sense; whilst optimal structurally though, construction can be prove to be prohibitively expensive.
keywords Topology optimization; robotics; hotwire cutting; EPS formwork; concrete structures
series eCAADe
email jelleferinga@gmail.com
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id sigradi2011_387
id sigradi2011_387
authors Fernandez, Monica Inés; Bonvecchi, Liliana
year 2011
title Realidad digital avanzada. Aproximación holística a la construcción del espacio urbano [Advanced digital reality. Holistic approach to the construction of the urban space]
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 193-196
summary From the education in architecture, we noticed the need to promote theoretical and critical reflection to contribute effectively in the training of professionals to diagnose problems; to promote the creative use of technology; and design interfaces to mediate through networks and virtual-real-joint trans-actions. This work concerns the study of alternative architectural language, that emphasizing the ethical responsibility of architecture, contribute to the architectural and urban viability Planned activities involve the operation of technological equipment, and are aimed at Advanced Digital Reality, to lead the construction of models, human resources training and applications in specific contexts designed to promote social inclusion.
series SIGRADI
email mifc@fibertel.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id acadia11_372
id acadia11_372
authors James, Anne; Nagasaka, Dai
year 2011
title Integrative Design Strategies for Multimedia in Architecture
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 372-379
summary Multidisciplinary efforts that have shaped the current integration of multimedia into architectural spaces have primarily been conducted by collaborative efforts among art, engineering, interaction design, informatics and software programming. These collaborations have focused on the complexities of designing for applications of multimedia in specific real world contexts. Outside a small but growing number of researchers and practitioners, architects have been largely absent from these efforts. This has resulted in projects that deal primarily with developing technologies augmenting existing architectural environments. (Greenfield and Shepard 2007)This paper examines the potential of multimedia and architecture integration to create new possibilities for architectural space. Established practices of constructing architecture suggest creating space by conventional architectural means. On the other hand, multimedia influences and their effect on the tectonics, topos and typos (Frampton 2001) of an architectural space (‘multimedia effects matrix’) suggest new modes of shaping space. It is proposed that correlations exist between those two that could inform unified design strategies. Case study analyses were conducted examining five works of interactive spaces and multimedia installation artworks, selected from an initial larger study of 25 works. Each case study investigated the means of shaping space employed, according to both conventional architectural practices and the principles of multimedia influence (in reference to the ‘multimedia effects matrix’) (James and Nagasaka 2010, 278-285). Findings from the case studies suggest strong correlations between the two approaches to spatial construction. To indicate these correlations, this paper presents five speculative integrative design strategies derived from the case studies, intended to inform future architectural design practice.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email annejames.07@gmail.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id acadia11_114
id acadia11_114
authors Kaczynski, Maciej P; McGee, Wes; Pigram, David
year 2011
title Robotically Fabricated Thin-shell Vaulting: A method for the integration of multi-axis fabrication processes with algorithmic form-finding techniques
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 114-121
summary This paper proposes and describes a new methodology for the design, fabrication, and construction of unreinforced thin-shell stone vaulting through the use of algorithmic form-finding techniques and multi-axis robotic water jet cutting. The techniques build upon traditional thin-shell masonry vaulting tectonics to produce a masonry system capable of self-support during construction. The proposed methodology expands the application of thin-shell vaulting to irregular forms, has the potential to reduce the labor cost of vault construction, and opens the possibility of response to external factors such as siting constraints and environmental criteria. The intent of the research is to reignite and reanimate unreinforced compressive masonry vaulting as a contemporary building practice.
keywords masonry vaulting; robotic fabrication; water-jet cutting; multi-axis fabrication; dynamic relaxation; file-to-factory; form-finding; self-supporting; parametric modeling; computational design
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email maciejpk@umich.edu
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id acadia11_350
id acadia11_350
authors Kim, Simon; Yim, Mark; Laucharoen, Jedtsada; Wetmore, Michael; Salek, Sanam; Pan, Sam
year 2011
title Motion and Modular Architecture
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 350-357
summary This paper presents an implementation of an architectural module that corresponds to a long serial chain modular robot. As such, this configuration poses possibilities that can move using travelling wave gaits based on snakes and caterpillars. The gaits are controlled with a Gait Control Table which is a simple but powerful way to coordinate the motion of a multiple degree-of-freedom systems. The gaits are implemented on a self-sufficient modular reconfigurable robot with onboard power, computation, sensors and actuators.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email simonkim@design.upenn.edu
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id ijac20119401
id ijac20119401
authors Ko, Kaon; Salvator-John Liotta
year 2011
title Decoding Culture Parametrically: Digital Tea House Case Studies
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 9 - no. 4, 325-338
summary This paper reviews the Digital Tea House, a workshop held at the University of Tokyo with the aim to build three pavilions for hosting tea ceremony.As first attempts on cultivating formal innovations resulting from digital design process applied to construction of tea houses, the works convey that parametric design can be a mechanism through which architects are able to produce new images of a tea house and renew its conceptual meanings, and that it can be a tool to retain architecture convergent with cultural values.The authors analyze issues addressed in the workshop that range from applications of computational design, interpretations of tradition, structural stability, to solutions for quick physical materialization within limited time and budget.This paper clarifies the following: First, that parametric processes are not contradictory to traditional cultural principles; and second, how traditional elements of the tea house were decoded and formally reinterpreted through parametric designs.
series journal
last changed 2012/02/14 08:02

_id ecaade2011_008
id ecaade2011_008
authors Kolovou, Eleni
year 2011
title Sensitive skin design: a generative approach
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.453-460
wos WOS:000335665500052
summary This paper presents a framework of study of an iterative evolution of a modular component designed in an attempt to simulate material constraints and motional response with the perspective to be multiplied into a dynamic system. The main scope of this project was to investigate the process that maps a territory of possibilities, among which lies the potential architectural solution. In order to explore this field a parametric model has been developed. The simulation of the materials nature has been embedded in the algorithm on a geometry constraint basis in an attempt to simulate the behavior of the system comprised by elements in tension and torsion. A multiplication process of the module was introduced at a following stage of the research focusing on regular tessellations and circle packing on the plane. Responsive performance has been studied on a selected specimen of the evolution given a hypothetic context scenario according to which the scale of the design was set at a façade component level. The resulting responsive permeable skin was presented as a potential design solution among the successive approximations of this algorithm. Along the course of the research the parametric tools were used not only as a medium of synchronous output visualization but also as a mechanism to simulate material properties, structural constrains, environmental data, and worked as stimuli of inspiration driving the overall design process.
keywords Parametric design; generative design; simulation and visualization; responsive skin
series eCAADe
email eleni_kolovou@yahoo.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ecaade2011_051
id ecaade2011_051
authors Marcos, Carlos L.
year 2011
title New materiality: ideation, representation and digital fabrication
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.351-360
wos WOS:000335665500040
summary Digital fabrication has become the true counterpoint to computer aided design in architecture. Thanks to new C.A.D./C.A.M. technologies architectural design can now manufacture complex buildings that only a decade ago could have been almost impossible to develop. This convergence between C.A.D./C.A.M. technologies is producing a trend from construction to manufacturing. Arbitrariness of architectural form should not be confused with arbitrariness of architectural design, the latter being contradictory with the very essence of design. Conventional or digital architecture must achieve design consistency and must rely on architecture’s basic principle, that of necessity. New materiality is a term being coined in relation to digital fabrication and the way it should address materiality in architecture. Innovation in the use of conventional materials, the ways in which they may be manufactured or tiled, as well as the emergence of new materials may outline what new materiality is about.
keywords Digital fabrication; new materiality; ideation; representation; open form
series eCAADe
email carlos.marcos@ua.es
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

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