CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 549

_id caadria2011_036
id caadria2011_036
authors Chae, Hee Hwa; Mi Jeong Kim, Ju Hyun Lee and Xiangyu Wang
year 2011
title A work service model of the ubiquitous office
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 375-384
summary In recent years, office environments adopt ubiquitous computing with a focus on collaboration and mobile communication to promote real-time enterprises. Within this context, this study deals with a significant issue on the ubiquitous office environments by understanding human behaviors and works. We propose a ubiquitous office model considering the correlation between ubiquitous computing technologies and work services in the office. Two attributes are focused, collaboration and mobility, as identifier for categorizing the work types. The classic types of work services have variations in the amount of communication and the proportion of working outside of the office. The proposed work service model includes territorial and non-territorial services for the ubiquitous office to enable workers in and out of the office to interact with each other. The findings in this paper would be a theoretical basis for embodying the intelligent office which supports office works efficiently and effectively.
keywords Ubiquitous office; work service model; ubiquitous computing; context awareness; collaboration
series CAADRIA
email hee0462@naver.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id cf2011_p016
id cf2011_p016
authors Merrick, Kathryn; Gu Ning
year 2011
title Supporting Collective Intelligence for Design in Virtual Worlds: A Case Study of the Lego Universe
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 637-652.
summary Virtual worlds are multi-faceted technologies. Facets of virtual worlds include graphical simulation tools, communication, design and modelling tools, artificial intelligence, network structure, persistent object-oriented infrastructure, economy, governance and user presence and interaction. Recent studies (Merrick et al., 2010) and applications (Rosenman et al., 2006; Maher et al., 2006) have shown that the combination of design, modelling and communication tools, and artificial intelligence in virtual worlds makes them suitable platforms for supporting collaborative design, including human-human collaboration and human-computer co-creativity. Virtual worlds are also coming to be recognised as a platform for collective intelligence (Levy, 1997), a form of group intelligence that emerges from collaboration and competition among large numbers of individuals. Because of the close relationship between design, communication and virtual world technologies, there appears a strong possibility of using virtual worlds to harness collective intelligence for supporting upcoming “design challenges on a much larger scale as we become an increasingly global and technological society” (Maher et al, 2010), beyond the current support for small-scale collaborative design teams. Collaborative design is relatively well studied and is characterised by small-scale, carefully structured design teams, usually comprising design professionals with a good understanding of the design task at hand. All team members are generally motivated and have the skills required to structure the shared solution space and to complete the design task. In contrast, collective design (Maher et al, 2010) is characterised by a very large number of participants ranging from professional designers to design novices, who may need to be motivated to participate, whose contributions may not be directly utilised for design purposes, and who may need to learn some or all of the skills required to complete the task. Thus the facets of virtual worlds required to support collective design differ from those required to support collaborative design. Specifically, in addition to design, communication and artificial intelligence tools, various interpretive, mapping and educational tools together with appropriate motivational and reward systems may be required to inform, teach and motivate virtual world users to contribute and direct their inputs to desired design purposes. Many of these world facets are well understood by computer game developers, as level systems, quests or plot and achievement/reward systems. This suggests the possibility of drawing on or adapting computer gaming technologies as a basis for harnessing collective intelligence in design. Existing virtual worlds that permit open-ended design – such as Second Life and There – are not specifically game worlds as they do not have extensive level, quest and reward systems in the same way as game worlds like World of Warcraft or Ultima Online. As such, while Second Life and There demonstrate emergent design, they do not have the game-specific facets that focus users towards solving specific problems required for harnessing collective intelligence. However, a new massively multiplayer virtual world is soon to be released that combines open-ended design tools with levels, quests and achievement systems. This world is called Lego Universe (www.legouniverse.com). This paper presents technology spaces for the facets of virtual worlds that can contribute to the support of collective intelligence in design, including design and modelling tools, communication tools, artificial intelligence, level system, motivation, governance and other related facets. We discuss how these facets support the design, communication, motivational and educational requirements of collective intelligence applications. The paper concludes with a case study of Lego Universe, with reference to the technology spaces defined above. We evaluate the potential of this or similar tools to move design beyond the individual and small-scale design teams to harness large-scale collective intelligence. We also consider the types of design tasks that might best be addressed in this manner.
keywords collective intelligence, collective design, virtual worlds, computer games
series CAAD Futures
email k.merrick@adfa.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id acadia11_90
id acadia11_90
authors Fure, Adam
year 2011
title Digital Materiallurgy: On the productive force of deep codes and vital matter
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 90-97
summary This paper expands the discourse surrounding digital forms of making by scrutinizing the role of materials within computation, ultimately proposing a speculative working model that charts new territory. The growing importance of materials within technological research makes this an appropriate time to consider the nuance of their role within it. Currently, material innovation is happening along two central tracks: the customized cutting, sculpting, and forming of conventional materials with Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) fabrication equipment and the development of new materials through innovations in material science. Both tracks rely on a limited set of material protocols which enable process-based control and eliminate the intrusion of any unpredictable material variable. Although efficient, such an approach limits architecture’s ability to procure novel material engagements. A few designers are developing an alternative model where computational codes are coupled with eccentric materials to produce unusual results. Digital materiallurgy, as I have called it, is part technique and part attitude; it relies on intentionally ceding limited design control to unpredictable matter—thus capitalizing on matter’s innate ability to produce unexpected formal and material complexity. Digital materiallurgy identifies the intersection of computation and eccentric materiality as a departure point for architectural innovation. By purposefully inserting material heterogeneity and inconsistency into computational means and methods, this work pries apart the apparently seamless relationship between digital design and physical production. By blurring the distinction between physical material and digital form, this work offers an integrated aesthetic experience, one that fetishizes neither the virtual nor the vintage but fuses both into a richer, wilder present.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email afure@umich.edu
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id ecaaderis2018_103
id ecaaderis2018_103
authors Davidová, Marie and Prokop, Šimon
year 2018
title TreeHugger - The Eco-Systemic Prototypical Urban Intervention
source Odysseas Kontovourkis (ed.), Sustainable Computational Workflows [6th eCAADe Regional International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 9789491207143], Department of Architecture, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus, 24-25 May 2018, pp. 75-84
keywords The paper discusses co-design, development, production, application of TreeHugger (see Figure 1). The co-design among community and trans-disciplinary participants with different expertise required scope of media mix, switching between analogue, digital and back again. This involves different degrees of physical and digital 'GIGA-Mapping' (Sevaldson, 2011, 2015), 'Grasshopper3d' (Davidson, 2017) scripting and mix of digital and analogue fabrication to address the real life world. The critical participation of this 'Time-Based Design' (Sevaldson, 2004, 2005) process is the interaction of the prototype with eco-systemic agency of the adjacent environment - the eco-systemic performance. The TreeHugger is a responsive solid wood insect hotel, generating habitats and edible landscaping (Creasy, 2004) on bio-tope in city centre of Prague. To extend the impact, the code was uploaded for communities to download, local-specifically edit and apply worldwide. Thus, the fusion of discussed processes is multi-scaled and multi-layered, utilised in emerging design field: Systemic Approach to Architectural Performance.
series eCAADe
email marie.davidova@gmail.com
last changed 2018/05/29 12:33

_id ijac20109103
id ijac20109103
authors Jun Chung, Daniel Hii; Malone-Lee Lai Choo
year 2011
title Computational Fluid Dynamics for Urban Design: The Prospects for Greater Integration
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 9 - no. 1, 33-54
summary Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has always been used in the field of architecture, urban design and urban planning to understand the patterns of wind flow through the built environment. Its analysis is important to evaluate whether the natural ventilation through a site is adequate to mitigate heat and pollutant to achieve better human comfort in dense urban environments. However, given the complex operational requirements, the response to wind flow is not always done early enough to support planning and design. This paper seeks to illustrate how CFD analysis can aid planning and design of urban areas and investigates the workflow requirements, in the hope of making the CFD simulations more accessible to the practices and contribute to design decisions. It also looks at the present technological advancements and future prospects to assess the scenarios where emerging technologies can make CFD simulation more readily available with affordable and even mobile hardware installations.
series journal
last changed 2019/05/24 07:55

_id caadria2013_080
id caadria2013_080
authors Koh, Immanuel
year 2013
title Computer Vision and Augmented Reality Technologies in Experimental Architectural Design Education at the AA
source Open Systems: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2013) / Singapore 15-18 May 2013, pp. 427-436
summary This paper aims to investigate the potential of both open source software and new media (esp. computer vision and augmented reality) as tools for architectural design and education. The examples illustrated in the paper would be drawn mainly from students’ projects done as part of their AA Media Studies Course submission at the AA School of Architecture (AA) during the academic years from 2011/2012 to 2012/2013. The paper outlines the main approaches, which students have chosen to implement, both directly and indirectly, these new media and tools into their studio work at the AA. Section 1 briefly introduces a range of currently available open source computational design toolkits that are deemed useful for quick implementation of computer vision and augmented reality technologies. The related programming languages, softwares and hardwares would also be introduced and described accordingly. Sections 2 and 3 are accompanied with a visual catalogue of students’ projects to better illustrate the diversity in the understanding and implementation of computer vision and augmented reality technologies in architectural design. Section 4 serves to conclude the paper by first discussing briefly the feedback from students at the end of the course before clarifying the context of the research and thus its relation to recent work done by others using similar technologies.  
wos WOS:000351496100042
keywords Computer vision, Augmented reality, Generative design, Interaction design 
series CAADRIA
email artplusik@gmail.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id caadria2011_020
id caadria2011_020
authors Lonsing, Werner and Peter Anders
year 2011
title Three-dimensional computational structures and the real world
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 209-218
summary In this paper, we describe a system of composite images to design virtual three-dimensional structures in an outdoor environment. The system, called AmbiViewer, consists of a modeler for three-dimensional on-site sketching, and overlapping locative technologies to orient virtual objects in a real-space, real-time setting. The system employs both GPS orientation and a visual marker system to provide a realistic and interactive augmented reality interface. While it is still under development, the authors believe it can bridge the gap between sketching on site, and creating virtual models in the office.
keywords Augmented reality; mixed reality, locative design; interactive mModeler; visualisation; GPS; cybrids
series CAADRIA
email caadria2011@lonsing.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id caadria2011_001
id caadria2011_001
authors Muslimin, Rizal
year 2011
title One-piece weaving: Reconfiguring folding and knotting algorithm in computational design
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 9-18
summary A beneficial symbiotic relationship between traditional crafts and new technologies may be achieved when computational designers view the existing traditional art and craft as partners to collaborate with and when traditional cultures are willing to accept new technologies in an enthusiastic yet critical manner. This research aims to reconfigure computational design paradigm at the intersection of traditional and digital technology by evaluating a series of relatively recent computational design experiments aimed at reconceptualizing weaving as a combination of folding algorithm and knot theory with respect to the apparent dialectical tension between traditional context and computational theories in architectural design.
keywords Weaving; folding; knot
series CAADRIA
email rizal@mit.edu
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id cf2011_p060
id cf2011_p060
authors Sheward, Hugo; Eastman Charles
year 2011
title Preliminary Concept Design (PCD) Tools for Laboratory Buildings, Automated Design Optimization and Assessment Embedded in Building Information Modeling (BIM) Tools.
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 451-476.
summary The design of laboratory buildings entails the implementation of a variety of design constraints such as building codes; design guidelines and technical requirements. The application of these requires from designers the derivation of data not explicitly available at early stages of design, at the same time there is no precise methodology to control the consistency, and accuracy of their application. Many of these constraints deal with providing secure environmental conditions for the activities inside laboratories and their repercussions both for the building occupants and population in general, these constraints mandate a strict control over the building’s Mechanical Equipment (MEP), in particular the Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system. Due to the importance of these laboratory designers are expected to assess their designs not only according spatial relationships, but also design variables such as HVAC efficiency, air pressure hierarchies, operational costs, and the possible implications of their design decisions in the biological safety of the facility. At this point in time, there are no practical methods for making these assessments, without having constant interaction with HVAC specialists. The assessment of laboratory design variables, particularly those technical in nature, such as dimensioning of ducts or energy consumption are usually performed at late stages of design. They are performed by domain experts using data manually extracted from design information, with the addition of domain specific knowledge, the evaluation is done mostly through manual calculations or building simulations. In traditional practices most expert evaluations are performed once the architectural design have been completed, the turn around of the evaluation might take hours or days depending on the methods used by the engineer, therefore reducing the possibility for design alternatives evaluation. The results of these evaluations will give clues about sizing of the HVAC equipment, and might generate the need for design reformulations, causing higher development costs and time delays. Several efforts in the development of computational tools for automated design evaluation such as wheel chair accessibility (Han, Law, Latombe, Kunz, 2002) security and circulation (Eastman, 2009), and construction codes (ww.Corenet.gov.sg) have demonstrated the capabilities of rule or parameter based building assessment; several computer applications capable of supporting HVAC engineers in system designing for late concept or design development exist, but little has been done to assess the capabilities of computer applications to support laboratory design during architectural Preliminary Concept Design(PCD) (Trcka, Hensen, 2010). Developments in CAD technologies such as Building Information Modeling (BIM) have opened doors to formal explorations in generative design using rule based or parametric modeling [7]. BIM represents buildings as a collection of objects with their own geometry, attributes, and relations. BIM also allows for the definition of objects parametrically including their relation to other model objects. BIM has enabled the development of automated rule based building evaluation (Eastman, 2009). Most of contemporary BIM applications contemplate in their default user interfaces access to design constraints and object attribute manipulations. Some even allow for the application of rules over these. Such capabilities make BIM viable platforms for automation of design data derivation and for the implementation of generative based design assessment. In this paper we analyze the possibilities provided by contemporary BIM for implementing generative based design assessment in laboratory buildings. In this schema, domain specific knowledge is embedded in to the BIM system as to make explicit design metrics that can help designers and engineers to assess the performance of design alternatives. The implementation of generative design assessments during PCD can help designers and engineers to identify design issues early in the process, reducing the number of revisions and reconfigurations in later stages of design. And generally improving design performance.
keywords Heating ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Building Information Models (BIM), Generative Design Assessment
series CAAD Futures
email hshewardga3@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2011_089
id ecaade2011_089
authors Sorguc, Arzu Gonenc; Selcuk, Semra Arslan; Cakici, Fatma Zehra
year 2011
title Computer Simulation as an Integral Part of Digital Design Education in Architecture: The Modulator
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.43-50
summary It has been more than a decade that the first discussions on the integration of computational technologies into architectural education, especially into the design studios have been started. Since then, the use of CAD from drafting to complex solid modeling and manufacturing in design studios has been mostly achieved. Yet, persisting on the discussions within the same context, mostly focusing on the studio education and CAD/CAM rather than “CAAD” avoids inquiring other potentials of them as being a learning and implementation media of different knowledge domains. In this context this papers presents a discussion on andragogic learning by the integration of simulation technologies to architectural education to synthesize the fragmented knowledge that provides new learning media.
wos WOS:000335665500003
keywords Computer simulation; digital design; architectural education; modeling; modulator
series eCAADe
email arzug@metu.edu.tr
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id cf2011_p135
id cf2011_p135
authors Chen Rui, Irene; Schnabel Marc Aurel
year 2011
title Multi-touch - the future of design interaction
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 557-572.
summary The next major revolution for design is to bring the natural user interaction into design activities. Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) brought a new approach that was more effective compared to their conventional predecessors. In recent years, Natural User Interfaces (NUI) have advanced user experiences and multi-touch and gesture technologies provide new opportunities for a variety of potential uses in design. Much attention has been paid to leverage in the design of interactive interfaces. The mouse input and desktop screen metaphors limit the information sharing for multiple users and also delayed the direct interaction for communication between each other. This paper proposes the innovative method by integrating game engine ‘Unity3D’ with multi-touch tangible interfaces. Unity3D provides a game development tool as part of its application package that has been designed to let users to focus on creating new games. However, it does not limit the usage of area to design additional game scenarios since the benefits of Unity3D is allowing users to build 3D environments with its customizable and easy to use editor, graphical pipelines to openGL (http://unity3d.com/, 2010 ). It creates Virtual Reality (VR) environments which can simulates places in the real world, as well as the virtual environments helping architects and designers to vividly represent their design concepts through 3D visualizations, and interactive media installations in a detailed multi-sensory experience. Stereoscopic displays advanced their spatial ability while solving issues to design e.g. urban spaces. The paper presents how a multi-touch tabletop can be used for these design collaboration and communication tasks. By using natural gestures, designers can now communicate and share their ideas by manipulating the same reference simultaneously using their own input simultaneously. Further studies showed that 3Dl forms are perceived and understood more readily through haptic and proprioceptive perception of tangible representations than through visual representation alone (Gillet et al, 2005). Based on the authors’ framework presented at the last CAADFutures, the benefits of integrating 3D visualization and tactile sensory can be illustrated in this platform (Chen and Wang, 2009), For instance, more than one designer can manipulate the 3D geometry objects on tabletop directly and can communicate successfully their ideas freely without having to waiting for the next person response. It made the work more effective which increases the overall efficiency. Designers can also collect the real-time data by any change they make instantly. The possibilities of Uniy3D make designing very flexible and fun, it is deeply engaging and expressive. Furthermore, the unity3D is revolutionizing the game development industry, its breakthrough development platform for creating highly interactive 3D content on the web (http://unity3d.com/ , 2010) or similar to the interface of modern multimedia devices such as the iPhone, therefore it allows the designers to work remotely in a collaborative way to integrate the design process by using the individual mobile devices while interacting design in a common platform. In design activities, people create an external representation of a domain, often of their own ideas and understanding. This platform helps learners to make their ideas concrete and explicit, and once externalized, subsequently they reflect upon their work how well it sits the real situation. The paper demonstrates how this tabletop innovatively replaces the typical desktop metaphor. In summary, the paper addresses two major issues through samples of collaborative design: firstly presenting aspects of learners’ interactions with physical objects, whereby tangible interfaces enables them constructing expressive representations passively (Marshall, 2007), while focussing on other tasks; and secondly showing how this novel design tool allows designers to actively create constructions that might not be possible with conventional media.
keywords Multi-touch tabletop, Tangible User Interface
series CAAD Futures
email rui.chen@sydney.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id 745e
id 745e
authors Derix C, Kimpian J, Mason J and Karanouh A
year 2011
title Feedback Architecture
source In Terri Peters (ed), Experimental Green Strategies: Ecological Design Research: Architectural Design (AD), Wiley and Sons, Nov-Dec 2011
summary Sustainable design and ecological building are the most significant global challenges for the design profession. To meet new building regulations and national targets for carbon emissions, all future buildings will be judged on their ‘green’ merits. For architects to maintain a competitive edge in a global market, innovation is now key; the design of new processes, technologies and materials that combat carbon emissions and improve the sustainable performance of buildings are paramount. Contemporary practices have responded by setting up multi- disciplinary internal research and development teams, with offices such as Foster + Partners, HOK and Aedas setting the bar for ground-breaking research and development. The aim of internal groups is often to adapt and create new technologies and materials and to borrow ways of working from other disciplines, to focus on innovation rather than incrementally increasing performance or efficiency. This title offers insights into how a wide range of established and emerging practices are rising to meet these challenges. In pursuit of integrated sustainability and low-energy building, material and formal innovation and new tools and technologies, it illustrates that the future of architecture is evolving in an exchange of ideas across disciplines. Incorporating the creation of new knowledge about ecological building within the profession, it also identifies the emergence of a collective will to seek out new routes that build in harmony with the environment.
keywords sustainability, morphology, performance, design computation
series journal paper
type normal paper
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-047068979X.html
last changed 2012/09/20 15:07

_id caadria2011_000
id caadria2011_000
authors Herr, Christiane M.; Ning Gu, Stanislav Roudavski and Marc A. Schnabel
year 2011
title CAADRIA2011: Circuit bending, breaking and mending
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, 773p.
series CAADRIA
email cmherr@mail.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2011/04/23 17:08

_id caadria2011_066
id caadria2011_066
authors Merrick, Kathryn; Ning Gu, Muhammad Niazi and Kamran Shafi
year 2011
title Motivation, cyberworlds and collective design
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 697-706
summary Collaborative design is characterised by small-scale, carefully structured, professional design teams. The increasing popularity of social computing and mass communication supported by cyberworlds suggests there is now also a strong possibility of design through mass participation, beyond small-scale, collaborative design scenarios. However to achieve collective intelligence in design, there is a need to motivate large groups of users to contribute constructively to design tasks. This paper studies different types of cyberworlds to classify the motivation profiles of their user bases. We compare these motivation profiles to those required for the emergence of collective intelligence and develop a list of technological requirements for cyberworlds to support collective intelligence and design.
keywords Collective intelligence; design; motivation; cyberworlds
series CAADRIA
email k.merrick@adfa.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id caadria2011_024
id caadria2011_024
authors Nakapan, Walaiporn and Ning Gu
year 2011
title Preliminary experiments of OPENSIM performance evaluation for virtual design studios
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 251-260
summary This paper presents a technical performance evaluation of OpenSim as an alternative platform to Second Life, for virtual design studios. A number of issues that are critical for conducting virtual design studios were investigated through a series of tests and reflections from a Visual Training class. A performance test was also carried out in order to test server load against computer memory. These findings will provide valuable understanding to academics looking to use similar environments to Second Life for virtual design studio.
keywords 3D virtual worlds; OpenSimulator; virtual design studios; performance evaluation
series CAADRIA
email walaiporn@rsu.ac.th
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id sigradi2011_337
id sigradi2011_337
authors Pupo, Regiane; Teixeira Mendes, Leticia; Andrade De Martino, Jarryer
year 2011
title Da parametrização à fabricação digital [From parametrization to digital fabrication]
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 163-166
summary The impact of new technologies as rapid prototyping and digital fabrication used throughout the design process has been a very discussed subject mainly in architecture teaching. Together with this discussion, the introduction of parametric software has a great importance in getting new perspectives and design innovation. In attempting the association of these two lines, the development of a roof project was one of the results of a subject in the postgraduate program at State University of Campinas, Brasil. The design process used those technologies, which allowed the analysis of the impacts they might have during each phase of the design process.
series SIGRADI
email regipupo@terra.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:58

_id sigradi2011_289
id sigradi2011_289
authors Sant’ Anna Claudino, Ana Emília; Celani, Gabriela; Pupo, Regiane
year 2011
title Gestão e otimização de laboratórios de fabricação digital [Management and optimization of digital fabrication laboratories]
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 461-464
summary The "Laboratory for Automation and prototyping for architecture and construction" is a digital fabrication lab at the University of Campinas open to students from the Architecture, Civil Engineering and Mechanic Engineering programs. Since its opening in 2007 the lab has developed many strategies to deal with the complexity of its management. The purpose of this paper is to share this experience with other similar facilities. Issues such as resources, supplies, maintenance of machines, managing appointments and other activities are described and discussed, base don the experience of one of a student monitor of the lab.
keywords Laboratory management; digital fabrication laboratorios; instruction laboratorios
series SIGRADI
email celani@fec.unicamp.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id ecaade2011_017
id ecaade2011_017
authors Achten, Henri; Koszewski, Krzysztof; Martens, Bob
year 2011
title What happened after the “Hype” on Virtual Design Studios?: Some Considerations for a Roundtable Discussion
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.23-32
summary The issue of collaborative design has been elaborated extensively within the framework of previous CAAD–conferences. Today, an appreciation for traditional attitudes and methods can be observed, but interestingly, a mixture of approaches is also noticeable (computational techniques used in low–tech fabrication environments, for example). This allows for a round–table survey of the current state–of–the–art focused on experiences related to distant learning in the architectural curriculum. To make VDS viable, not only are technological solutions necessary, but so are social (among people) and professional (ways of behavior) ones. In this round–table we aim to identify critical factors of success (or failure).
wos WOS:000335665500001
keywords Education; architectural curriculum; blended learning; collaborative design; VDS
series eCAADe
email achten@fa.cvut.cz
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ijac201310105
id ijac201310105
authors Agkathidis, Asterios and Andre_ Brown
year 2013
title Tree-Structure Canopy:A Case Study in Design and Fabrication of Complex Steel Structures using Digital Tools
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 11 - no. 1, 87-104
summary This paper describes and reflects on the design and manufacturing process of the Tree-Structure canopy for the WestendGate Tower in Frankfurt upon Main, completed early 2011.The project investigated fabrication and assembly principles of complex steel structures as well as the integration of contemporary computational design, engineering, optimization and simulation techniques in a collaborative design approach. This paper focuses on the notion of modular standardization as opposed to non standard customized components. It also engages with issues relating to digital production tools and their impact on construction cost, material performance and tolerances. In addition it examines the reconfiguration of liability during a planning and construction process, an aspect which can be strongly determined by fabrication companies rather than the architect or designer.This paper is written as a reflection on the complete building process when contemporary digital tools are used from design through to fabrication. It studies both the generation of the steel structure as well the ETFE cushion skin. It reports on a collaborative project, where the main author was responsible for the canopies design, parameterization, digitalization and fabrication, as well as for the dissemination of the outcomes and findings during the design and realization process.As such it represents an example of research through design in a contemporary and evolving field.The canopy received a design award by the Hellenic Architecture Association.
series journal
last changed 2019/05/24 07:55

_id ecaade2011_099
id ecaade2011_099
authors Ahlquist, Sean; Menges, Achim
year 2011
title Methodological Approach for the Integration of Material Information and Performance in the Design Computation for Tension-Active Architectural Systems
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.799-808
summary As computational design processes have moved from representation to simulation, the focus has shifted towards advanced integration of performance as a form defining measure. Performance, though, is often assessed purely on the level of geometry and stratified between hierarchically independent layers. When looking at tension-active membrane systems, performance is integrated across multiple levels and with only the membrane material itself, defining the structural, spatial and atmospheric qualities. The research described in this paper investigates the integrative nature of this type of lightweight structure and proposes methodologies for generating highly articulated and differentiated systems. As material is a critical component, the research focuses on a system-based approach which places priority on the inclusion of material research and parameterization into a behavior-based computational process.
wos WOS:000335665500092
keywords Material behavior; material computation; system; gestalt; tension-active system
series eCAADe
email sean.ahlquist@icd.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

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