CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 1 to 20 of 152

_id ecaade2011_022
id ecaade2011_022
authors Achten, Henri
year 2011
title Degrees of Interaction: Towards a Classification
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.565-572
summary In architecture various approaches have been developed do deal with changing demands on the building. The most recent development is interactive architecture. In this paper we aim to outline what interactive architecture is. First we define the type of performance behavior that an interactive building or environment has. Following, we consider the relation between the system and the user. We derive four types of relations, characterized as “perfect butler,” “partner,” “environmental,” and “wizard.” Interactive systems are composed of sensors, controllers, actuators, and materials. Various degrees of interactivity can be achieved with such systems, ranging from passive, reactive, autonomous, to agent systems. Complete with earlier discussion of design methods this provides the range of aspects that should be considered when designing interactive architecture.
wos WOS:000335665500065
keywords Interactive architecture; Human-Computer interaction; design theory
series eCAADe
email achten@fa.cvut.cz
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ijac20109301
id ijac20109301
authors Biloria, Nimish
year 2011
title InfoMatters, a multi-agent systems approach for generating performative architectural formations
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 9 - no. 3, 205-222
summary The research paper exemplifies upon a computationally intensive inter-disciplinary research driven design investigation into spatializing the relationship between digital information and physical matter. Focusing on the development of architectural scale urban inserts, the design-research work operates on the intersection of information technology, environmental design, architecture, and computer aided manufacturing domains.The research framework revolves around developing a seamless integration of the aforementioned disciplines in order to establish iterative simulation driven methodologies for generating bottom-up sustainable architectural formations. This is achieved by establishing parametrically driven relational linkages between differential data sets (environmental, social, topological, material etc), which formulate the context (both global and local) within which the proposed project has to be designed. A selforganizing multi-agent system based simulation methodology for generating resultant spatial formations, in time, based on the impacts of the parametric relationships between the aforementioned data sets is eventually embarked upon. This implies, understanding the site as a dynamic information field within which interdependent ecology of agents (representing typology of people, program, structure, speed, desired social interaction etc) with multi-level relational affinities amongst each other as well as the dynamic urban information field. The resultant self-organized multi-agent formations are iteratively mined for identifying logical three-dimensional structural patterns or subjected to programmatic and environmental need driven additional layer of structural simulation with pre-embedded material restraints. An optimized system of multi-performative components that not only populates but also serves as an integrated structural + skin system of the results obtained from the agent based simulations (based upon the degree of inclusion/exclusion of parameters such as the amount of light, sound, wind etc) is subsequently generated. These experimental projects attained the status of self-evolving ecologies of multi-dimensional agents with embodied behavioural profiles, thus providing engaged, highly interdependent design by simulation outputs. The outputs showcase a dynamic system's driven approach towards sustainable design by stressing upon the idea of cohesively binding information and material systems from the very beginning of the design process. Such approaches help in reducing post-optimization of built form and consequently allow for rational understanding of performance criteria and its impact on formal articulations throughout the design process.
series journal
last changed 2019/05/24 07:55

_id ecaade2011_114
id ecaade2011_114
authors Droste, Stephan
year 2011
title Turmitecture: A generic approach for autonomous topological generation
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.558-562
summary The paper describes and discusses a generic approach for generative design by Turing Machines operating on a three-dimensionally folded surface. It is part of an on going research on concurrent cooperative design processes in architecture. During the development of systems for simplified generic interaction in spatial design, it turned out that the basic operations are applicable to be processed by non-sophisticated automata. If the spatial configuration is interpreted as the medium for an ordinary state machine, the whole system adds up to a kind of Turing Machine. Since 2D-Turing Machines are often referred to as “turmites”, and the proposed system is based on a yet three-dimensional folded, but still twodimensional surface - the automaton will be called “Turmitect”.
wos WOS:000335665500064
keywords Collaborative Design; Generative Design; Design Concepts; Shape Studies; Virtual Architecture
series eCAADe
email stephan@casino.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id acadia11_170
id acadia11_170
authors El Sheikh, Mohamed; Gerber, David
year 2011
title Building Skin Intelligence: A parametric and algorithmic tool for daylighting performance design integration
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 170-177
summary The research presents a methodology and tool development which delineates a performance-based design integration to address the design, simulation, and proving of an intelligent building skin design and its impact on daylighting performance. Through the design of an algorithm and parametric process for integrating daylighting performance into the design phase an automated configuration evaluation is achieved. Specifically the tool enables design exploration of semi autonomous and fully autonomous configurations of an exterior building envelope louver system. The research situates itself in the field of intelligent building skins and adds to the existing solutions a validation of systems with interdependent louvers of varying tilt angles. The system is designed to respond to dynamic daylighting conditions and occupants’ preferences. Within the framework of this study, Grasshopper, Rhino, Galapagos and DIVA, are linked and coded into one integrated process, facilitating design optioneering with near real time feedback. The paper concludes with a description of the tool set’s extensibility, future incorporation of domain integration, and conflation of natural and physical system interaction and complexity.
keywords kinetic facades; parametric design; design integration; daylighting; performative design; design optioneering; realtime feedback
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email elsheikh@usc.edu
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id caadria2011_043
id caadria2011_043
authors Grace, Kazjon S.; Robert Saunders and John S. Gero
year 2011
title Applying interpretation-driven association to design domains
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 453-462
summary This paper presents a computational model of visual association- making. Our model focuses on the interaction between the processes of representation and matching in association. Re-interpretation of the objects being associated changes the landscape in which the matching process is searching for potential mappings between those objects. We call this process interpretation-driven search. We demonstrate the capabilities of our system through some examples of previous work in simple shape domains, then discuss ongoing research into applying this system to design domains.
keywords Visual association; interpretation; computational model; design cognition
series CAADRIA
email kazjon@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id cf2011_p019
id cf2011_p019
authors Haeusler, Matthias Hank; Beilharz Kirsty
year 2011
title Architecture = Computer‚ from Computational to Computing Environments
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 217-232.
summary Drawing on architecture, urban digital media, engineering, IT and interaction design, the research presented in this paper outlines a possible shift from architecture designed through computation (any type of process, algorithm or measurement done in a computational matter) towards architecture capable of computing (developing, using and improving computer technology, computer hardware and software as a space-defining element). The research is driven by recent developments in four fields, as follows: (a) Architecture in its recent development has shifted from a planar box, as was the ideal in the modernist movement, towards complex and non-standard forms. (b) The design concepts of non-standard surfaces have been adopted into media facades and media architecture by liberating the pixel from its planar position on a screen [1]. (c) Advancements in pervasive computing applications are now able both to receive information from the environment in which they are used and to detect other devices that enter this environment [2]. (d) Developments in advanced autonomous systems such as Human Computer Interaction (HCI) or Human Robot Interaction (HRI), have produced intelligent systems capable of observing human cues and using these cues as the basis for intelligent decision-making [3]. Media fa_ßade developments work in the direction of the above-mentioned four fields, but often come with limitations in architectural integration; they need additional components to interact with their environment and their interactions are both often limited to visual interactions and require the user to act first. The researched system, Polymedia Pixel [4] discussed in this paper, can overcome these limitations and fulfil the need for a space-defining material capable of computing, thus enabling a shift from architecture designed by computation towards architecture capable of active computing. The Polymedia Pixel architecture merges digital technology with ubiquitous computing. This allows the built environment and its relation with digital technology to develop from (a) architecture being represented by computer to (b) computation being used to develop architecture and then further to where (c) architecture and the space-defining objects have computing attributes. Hence the study presented aims to consider and answer this key question: ‚ÄòWhen building components with computing capacity can define space and function as a computer at the same time, what are the constraints for the building components and what are the possible advantages for the built environment?‚Äô The conceptual framework, design and methods used in this research combine three fields: (a) hardware (architecture and design, electronic engineering) (b) software (content design and IT) and (c) interaction design (HCI and HRI). Architecture and urban design determinates the field of application. Media architecture and computer science provide the technological foundation, while the field of interaction design defines the methodology to link space and computing [5]. The conceptual starting point is to rethink the application of computers in architecture and, if architecture is capable of computing, what kind of methodology and structure would find an answer to the above core research question, and what are the implications of the question itself? The case study discusses opportunities for applying the Polymedia Pixel as an architectural component by testing it on: (a) constraint testing ‚Äì applying computational design methodologies to design space (b) singular testing - discussing the advantages for an individual building, and (c) plural testing ‚Äì investigating the potential for an urban context. The research aims to contribute to the field of knowledge through presenting first steps of a System < - > System mode where buildings can possibly watch and monitor each other, additional to the four primary interactive modes of operation. This investigation, its proposed hypothesis, methodology, implications, significance and evaluation are presented in the paper.
keywords media architecture, computational environments, ubiquitous computing, interaction design, computer science
series CAAD Futures
email matthias.haeusler@uts.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id caadria2011_027
id caadria2011_027
authors Hua, Hao and Ting-Li Jia
year 2011
title Interaction in terms of individuality and intelligibility
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 281-290
summary This paper points out that “interaction” is not only a scientific issue but also a social-cultural issue. The relationship between the user experiences and the behaviours of the system should be emphasised. The “Individual-Intelligible” coordinate system is created to compare and evaluate the interactivity of various systems, it provides a new design space for researches or students experimenting with interactive systems. Four experiments are discussed with the new formulation of the interaction.
keywords Interaction; individual; intelligible
series CAADRIA
email hhua@stundent.ethz.ch
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id cf2011_p099
id cf2011_p099
authors Huang, Andy; Erhan Halil, Woodbury Robert, Nasirova Diliara, Kozlova Karine
year 2011
title Collaboration Workflow Simplified: Reduction of Device Overhead for Integrated Design Collaboration
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 591-602.
summary Design collaboration relies on cognitive tools such as analog media and digital peripheral devices, and shows the characteristics of distributed cognition. It is a social and complex activity involving multiple agents communicating and using external cognitive tools to encode, decode, and share information in the process of collaborative task completion. The systems supporting this activity should meet the ’principle of least collaboration effort’ [4] that proposes that agents in collaboration minimize their effort in presentation and acceptance of information. Yet, current collaboration systems are dispersed mixed media that is often overloaded with representations and functionality, thus preventing seam- less information sharing. Designers are required to spend extra effort collecting information using peripheral devices and in system management when sharing information. The goal of this study is to understand these overheads in infor- mation collection and sharing using peripheral devices, and to provide designers with a supportive platform to enhance collaboration using both analog and digital media. In this paper, we first review available peripheral devices such as smart pens, digital cameras, and voice recorders, as well as existing collaboration sup- porting software systems for their benefits and deficiencies in collaboration. We then present ’DiNa’, a collaboration platform that is envisioned to improve pro- ductivity and reduce redundant work by integrating peripheral devices into the collaboration workflow. We demonstrate a possible workflow using this system through several scenarios where designers collaborate in performing a series of design tasks. We hope to bring attention to the importance least collaborative effort in designing systems to support real-world collaboration.
keywords Collaboration, Peripheral Devices, Knowledge Collection, Human Computer Interaction, Computer Aided Design
series CAAD Futures
email huang_a@sfu.ca
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id caadria2011_053
id caadria2011_053
authors Jalalian, Arash; Stephan K. Chalup and Michael J. Ostwald
year 2011
title Agent-agent interaction as a component of agent-environment interaction in the modelling and analysis of pedestrian visual behaviour
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 555-564
summary This multidisciplinary project involves concepts from architectural design, statistical learning, machine vision, and human ecology. The focus is on analysing how pedestrians’ dynamic behaviour in space is influenced by the environmental design of different architectural scenarios. This paper presents a multi-agent pedestrian simulation and analysis system that supports agent-to-agent interactions, different spatial desires, and interpersonal distance. The system simulates and analyses pedestrian spatial behaviour with combined focus on movement trajectories, walking speed, and the visual gaze vector. The analysis component relies on learning a statistical model characterising normal/abnormal behaviour, based on sample observations of regular pedestrian movements without/with the impacts of significant visual attractions in the environment. Using the example of Wheeler Place in Newcastle (Australia) our pilot experiments demonstrate how pedestrian behaviour characteristics can depend on selected features in the visual environment. The presented system will allow architects and urban designers to obtain better assessment of planned urban spaces and streetscape characteristics and their impacts on pedestrian behaviour.
keywords Agent interaction; pedestrian behaviour; analysis
series CAADRIA
email arash.jalalian@uon.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id caadria2011_013
id caadria2011_013
authors Kozlova, Karine; Roham M. Sheikholeslami, Lyn Bartram and Robert F. Woodbury
year 2011
title Graph visualization in computer-aided design: An exploration of alternative representations for GenerativeComponentsTM Symbolic View
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 133-142
summary In this paper we explore graph models used to illustrate the relationships between elements of designs in computer-aided design (CAD) systems. We discuss common limitations and ways to make such representations more usable and interactive. In order to study common problems of symbolic representations in CAD systems, we conducted a survey of a number of CAD applications that employ graph representations in their interface and provided comparative analysis of the properties of graph representations in these systems. As a case study we used Bentley GenerativeComponentsTM (GC) system - a parametric CAD application that uses graph (“symbolic”) view to visualize the structure of design. We conducted series of interviews with expert GC users that revealed many limitations of the GC symbolic view. To address these limitations, we developed alternative representations of symbolic view that aim at enhancing user experience with the system and reviewed these with expert GC users. As a result of our study, we developed a set of interactive prototypes using SHriMP1 visualization tool and Processing programming language. These provide improved ways of user interaction with symbolic representation, including better readability of the graph and, as a result, an improved support for design model analysis.
keywords Graph visualization; visual interfaces; CAD systems; visual interaction; node-link diagrams
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email karine.kozlova@sfu.ca
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id ecaade2011_014
id ecaade2011_014
authors Langenhan, Christoph; Haß, Sebastian; Weber, Markus; Petzold, Frank; Liwicki, Marcus; Dengel, Andreas
year 2011
title Investigating research strategies for accessing knowledge stored in semantic models
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.403-411
summary Current data storage and retrieval strategies usually use keywords and are not well suited to retrieving spatial configurations, the proportions of rooms or their interrelationships. Instead of using text-based research, a graphical inquiry and query system is proposed that can recognise formal structures on the one hand and concept sketches on the other. Using artificial intelligence methods and multimodal interaction, knowledge is stored in semantic models. From previously stored planning solutions in a BIM, semantic fingerprints are derived that describe their functional and topological characteristics. The search system likewise derives a semantic fingerprint from the spatial configuration of a concept sketch and compares it with fingerprints stored in the repository. Similar matches are then shown to the designer.
wos WOS:000335665500046
keywords Knowledge management; ontology; case-based design; industry foundation classes; multimodal
series eCAADe
email langenhan@ai.ar.tum.de
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id cf2011_p110
id cf2011_p110
authors Mcmeel, Dermott
year 2011
title I think Therefore i-Phone: The influence of Pervasive Media on Collaboration and Multi-Disciplinary Group Work
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 69-84.
summary The study of value and its transfer during the multi-disciplinary process of design is stable fodder for research; an entire issue of Design Studies has been devoted to Values in the Design Process. By scrutinising design meetings Dantec (2009) and Ball (2009) separately examine the mechanisms of value transfer between the agents involved in design (clients, designers, engineers). Dantec suggests this is best understood in terms of requirement, values and narrative; Ball proposes it should be viewed as a combination of "analogical reasoning" and "environmental simulation". If we look at Vitruvius and his primary architectural manual (Pollio 1960) we find values‚Äîin the form of firmitas, utilitas and venustas‚Äîembedded in this early codification of architectural practice. However, as much current research is restricted to design practice what occurs when value frameworks move between domains of cultural activity (such as design to construction and vice-versa) is not privileged with a comparably sizable body of research. This paper is concerned with the ongoing usage of pervasive media and cellular phones within communications and value transfer across the disciplinary threshold of design and construction. Through participation in a building project we analyse the subtleties of interaction between analogue communication such as sketches and digitally sponsored communication such as e-mail and mobile phone usage. Analysing the communications between the designer and builder during construction suggests it is also a creative process and the distinctions between design and construction processes are complex and often blurred. This work provides an observational basis for understanding mobile computing as a dynamic ‚Äòtuning‚Äô device‚Äîas hypothesized by Richard Coyne (2010)‚Äîthat ameliorates the brittleness of communication between different disciplines. A follow up study deploys ‚Äòdigital fieldnotes‚Äô (dfn) a bespoke iPhone application designed to test further suppositions regarding the influence exerted upon group working by mobile computing. Within collaboration individual communiqu_©s have different levels of importance depending on the specific topic of discussion and the contributing participant. This project furthers the earlier study; expanding upon what mobile computing is and enabling us to infer how these emergent devices affect collaboration. Findings from these two investigations suggest that the synchronous and asynchronous clamour of analogue and digital tools that surround design and construction are not exclusively inefficiencies or disruptions to be expunged. Observational evidence suggests they may provide contingency and continue to have value attending to the relationship between static components‚Äîand the avoidance of failure‚Äîwithin a complex system such as design and construction.
keywords collaboration, design, mobile computing, digital media
series CAAD Futures
email d.mcmeel@auckland.ac.nz
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id cf2011_p016
id cf2011_p016
authors Merrick, Kathryn; Gu Ning
year 2011
title Supporting Collective Intelligence for Design in Virtual Worlds: A Case Study of the Lego Universe
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 637-652.
summary Virtual worlds are multi-faceted technologies. Facets of virtual worlds include graphical simulation tools, communication, design and modelling tools, artificial intelligence, network structure, persistent object-oriented infrastructure, economy, governance and user presence and interaction. Recent studies (Merrick et al., 2010) and applications (Rosenman et al., 2006; Maher et al., 2006) have shown that the combination of design, modelling and communication tools, and artificial intelligence in virtual worlds makes them suitable platforms for supporting collaborative design, including human-human collaboration and human-computer co-creativity. Virtual worlds are also coming to be recognised as a platform for collective intelligence (Levy, 1997), a form of group intelligence that emerges from collaboration and competition among large numbers of individuals. Because of the close relationship between design, communication and virtual world technologies, there appears a strong possibility of using virtual worlds to harness collective intelligence for supporting upcoming “design challenges on a much larger scale as we become an increasingly global and technological society” (Maher et al, 2010), beyond the current support for small-scale collaborative design teams. Collaborative design is relatively well studied and is characterised by small-scale, carefully structured design teams, usually comprising design professionals with a good understanding of the design task at hand. All team members are generally motivated and have the skills required to structure the shared solution space and to complete the design task. In contrast, collective design (Maher et al, 2010) is characterised by a very large number of participants ranging from professional designers to design novices, who may need to be motivated to participate, whose contributions may not be directly utilised for design purposes, and who may need to learn some or all of the skills required to complete the task. Thus the facets of virtual worlds required to support collective design differ from those required to support collaborative design. Specifically, in addition to design, communication and artificial intelligence tools, various interpretive, mapping and educational tools together with appropriate motivational and reward systems may be required to inform, teach and motivate virtual world users to contribute and direct their inputs to desired design purposes. Many of these world facets are well understood by computer game developers, as level systems, quests or plot and achievement/reward systems. This suggests the possibility of drawing on or adapting computer gaming technologies as a basis for harnessing collective intelligence in design. Existing virtual worlds that permit open-ended design – such as Second Life and There – are not specifically game worlds as they do not have extensive level, quest and reward systems in the same way as game worlds like World of Warcraft or Ultima Online. As such, while Second Life and There demonstrate emergent design, they do not have the game-specific facets that focus users towards solving specific problems required for harnessing collective intelligence. However, a new massively multiplayer virtual world is soon to be released that combines open-ended design tools with levels, quests and achievement systems. This world is called Lego Universe (www.legouniverse.com). This paper presents technology spaces for the facets of virtual worlds that can contribute to the support of collective intelligence in design, including design and modelling tools, communication tools, artificial intelligence, level system, motivation, governance and other related facets. We discuss how these facets support the design, communication, motivational and educational requirements of collective intelligence applications. The paper concludes with a case study of Lego Universe, with reference to the technology spaces defined above. We evaluate the potential of this or similar tools to move design beyond the individual and small-scale design teams to harness large-scale collective intelligence. We also consider the types of design tasks that might best be addressed in this manner.
keywords collective intelligence, collective design, virtual worlds, computer games
series CAAD Futures
email k.merrick@adfa.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id cf2011_p115
id cf2011_p115
authors Pohl, Ingrid; Hirschberg Urs
year 2011
title Sensitive Voxel - A reactive tangible surface
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 525-538.
summary Haptic and tactile sensations, the active or passive exploration of our built surroundings through our sense of touch, give us a direct feeling and detailed information of space, a sense of architecture (Pallasmaa 2005). This paper presents the prototype of a reactive surface system, which focuses its output on the sense of touch. It explains how touch sensations influence the perception of architecture and discusses potential applications that might arise from such systems in the future. A growing number of projects demonstrate the strong impact of interaction design on the human senses and perception. They offer new ways of sensing and experiencing architectural space. But the majority of these interaction concepts focus on visual and auditory output-effects. The sense of touch is typically used as an input generator, but neglected as as a potential receiver of stimuli. With all the possibilities of sensors and micro-devices available nowadays, there is no longer a technical reason for this. It is possible to explore a much wider range of sense responding projects, to broaden the horizon of sensitive interaction concepts (Bullivant 2006). What if the surfaces of our surroundings can actively change the way it feels to touch them? What if things like walls and furniture get the ability to interactively respond to our touch? What new dimensions of communication and esthetic experience will open up when we conceive of tangibility in this bi-directional way? This paper presents a prototype system aimed at exploring these very questions. The prototype consists of a grid of tangible embedded cells, each one combining three kinds of actuators to produce divergent touch stimuli. All cells can be individually controlled from an interactive computer program. By providing a layering of different combinations and impulse intensities, the grid structure enables altering patterns of actuation. Thus it can be employed to explore a sort of individual touch aesthetic, for which - in order to differentiate it from established types of aesthetic experiences - we have created the term 'Euhaptics' (from the Greek ευ = good and άπτω = touch, finger). The possibility to mix a wide range of actuators leads to blending options of touch stimuli. The sense of touch has an expanded perception- spectrum, which can be exploited by this technically embedded superposition. The juxtaposed arrangement of identical multilayered cell-units offers blending and pattern effects of different touch-stimuli. It reveals an augmented form of interaction with surfaces and interactive material structures. The combination of impulses does not need to be fixed a priori; it can be adjusted during the process of use. Thus the sensation of touch can be made personally unique in its qualities. The application on architectural shapes and surfaces allows the user to feel the sensations in a holistic manner – potentially on the entire body. Hence the various dimensions of touch phenomena on the skin can be explored through empirical investigations by the prototype construction. The prototype system presented in the paper is limited in size and resolution, but its functionality suggests various directions of further development. In architectural applications, this new form of overlay may lead to create augmented environments that let inhabitants experience multimodal touch sensations. By interactively controlling the sensual patterns, such environments could get a unique “touch” for every person that inhabit them. But there may be further applications that go beyond the interactive configuration of comfort, possibly opening up new forms of communication for handicapped people or applications in medical and therapeutic fields (Grunwald 2001). The well-known influence of touch- sensations on human psychological processes and moreover their bodily implications suggest that there is a wide scope of beneficial utilisations yet to be investigated.
keywords Sensitive Voxel- A reactive tangible surface
series CAAD Futures
email inge@sbox.tugraz.at
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id fb59
id fb59
authors Schnabel, Marc Aurel; Chen, Rui Irene
year 2011
title Design Interaction via Multi-touch
source Computer Science Cooperative Design, Visualization, and Engineering, CDVE 2011, Y. Luo (Ed.): Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2011, Volume 6874/2011, 14-21
summary We present a multi-touch-tabletop tool for design-collaborations and -communication tasks employing three-dimensional digitalized models. Our system allows users from various disciplines to communicate and share their ideas by manipulating the reference and their own input simultaneously by simply using intuitive gestures. Haptic and proprioceptive perception of tangible representations are perceived and understood more readily whereby our system provides an increased potential to compensate for the low spatial cognition of its users. Our integration of combining both model-based and participatory approaches with multi-touch tabletop system setups differs considerably from conventional visual representations for collaborative design. Since the multi-touch design interaction allows users to engage intuitively within virtual design environments, it is presenting a next generation of common graphical user interfaces.
keywords Multi-touch, collaboration, interaction, haptic, design
series book
type normal paper
email marcaurel@cuhk.edu.hk
more http://www.springerlink.com/content/y4k7w218359g257q/
last changed 2011/10/22 02:59

_id cf2011_p060
id cf2011_p060
authors Sheward, Hugo; Eastman Charles
year 2011
title Preliminary Concept Design (PCD) Tools for Laboratory Buildings, Automated Design Optimization and Assessment Embedded in Building Information Modeling (BIM) Tools.
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 451-476.
summary The design of laboratory buildings entails the implementation of a variety of design constraints such as building codes; design guidelines and technical requirements. The application of these requires from designers the derivation of data not explicitly available at early stages of design, at the same time there is no precise methodology to control the consistency, and accuracy of their application. Many of these constraints deal with providing secure environmental conditions for the activities inside laboratories and their repercussions both for the building occupants and population in general, these constraints mandate a strict control over the building’s Mechanical Equipment (MEP), in particular the Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system. Due to the importance of these laboratory designers are expected to assess their designs not only according spatial relationships, but also design variables such as HVAC efficiency, air pressure hierarchies, operational costs, and the possible implications of their design decisions in the biological safety of the facility. At this point in time, there are no practical methods for making these assessments, without having constant interaction with HVAC specialists. The assessment of laboratory design variables, particularly those technical in nature, such as dimensioning of ducts or energy consumption are usually performed at late stages of design. They are performed by domain experts using data manually extracted from design information, with the addition of domain specific knowledge, the evaluation is done mostly through manual calculations or building simulations. In traditional practices most expert evaluations are performed once the architectural design have been completed, the turn around of the evaluation might take hours or days depending on the methods used by the engineer, therefore reducing the possibility for design alternatives evaluation. The results of these evaluations will give clues about sizing of the HVAC equipment, and might generate the need for design reformulations, causing higher development costs and time delays. Several efforts in the development of computational tools for automated design evaluation such as wheel chair accessibility (Han, Law, Latombe, Kunz, 2002) security and circulation (Eastman, 2009), and construction codes (ww.Corenet.gov.sg) have demonstrated the capabilities of rule or parameter based building assessment; several computer applications capable of supporting HVAC engineers in system designing for late concept or design development exist, but little has been done to assess the capabilities of computer applications to support laboratory design during architectural Preliminary Concept Design(PCD) (Trcka, Hensen, 2010). Developments in CAD technologies such as Building Information Modeling (BIM) have opened doors to formal explorations in generative design using rule based or parametric modeling [7]. BIM represents buildings as a collection of objects with their own geometry, attributes, and relations. BIM also allows for the definition of objects parametrically including their relation to other model objects. BIM has enabled the development of automated rule based building evaluation (Eastman, 2009). Most of contemporary BIM applications contemplate in their default user interfaces access to design constraints and object attribute manipulations. Some even allow for the application of rules over these. Such capabilities make BIM viable platforms for automation of design data derivation and for the implementation of generative based design assessment. In this paper we analyze the possibilities provided by contemporary BIM for implementing generative based design assessment in laboratory buildings. In this schema, domain specific knowledge is embedded in to the BIM system as to make explicit design metrics that can help designers and engineers to assess the performance of design alternatives. The implementation of generative design assessments during PCD can help designers and engineers to identify design issues early in the process, reducing the number of revisions and reconfigurations in later stages of design. And generally improving design performance.
keywords Heating ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Building Information Models (BIM), Generative Design Assessment
series CAAD Futures
email hshewardga3@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id cf2011_p095
id cf2011_p095
authors Shin, Dongyoun; Muller Arisona Stefan, Schmitt Gerhard
year 2011
title Crowdsourcing Urban Simulation Platform Using Mobile Devices and Social Networking Media Technologies
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 233-246.
summary Introduction and Research Questions The research area of urban simulation methods has grown notably in recent decades. Most of the research topics that concern urban simulation have concentrated on defining the complexities of urban environments with certain rules and algorithms. However, cities are getting more complex and changes to them are being made at greater speed. Therefore, current urban simulation modeling approaches based on rules and protocols are still struggling to reduce the gap between the virtual simulation environment and the real cities, since the behavior of citizens is frequently unpredictable and continuously adapting. In this context, research is necessary to develop more fundamental simulation methods that can handle these complexities and changes, leading to new design decision support systems. Therefore, this research was motivated with the following questions: What is the origin of the complexities and transformations of the urban environment? How can we approach the origin to deal with the urban complexities and transformations? To answer these questions, we hypothesize that the diverse human intentions are the origin of the issues that result from all of the complexities and changes of the cities. General Objectives As a result, we propose a participatory simulation environment that brings human intention into the urban simulator: a crowdsourcing [1] simulation platform that is operated by the people‚Äôs participation. To achieve this crowdsourcing urban sustainability simulation environment, we must address the following research issues: categorization of urban sustainability indicators and technologies, inducing mass participations, and an implementation of social network services. Furthermore, we aim at using mobile computing devices, such as smart phones, as a terminal to the simulation environment. Fundamental Goals Our goal is to enable people to share urban information at any time and to compare each other‚Äôs contributions through the crowdsourcing urban simulation platform. The information will be returned to the citizens to support their sustainability-aware life. The simulation platform also gives a chance not only to compare each other‚Äôs levels of sustainability, but also to give self-satisfaction through an altruistic contribution for a sustainable future. Thus, people shall utilize the simulator in order to predict their individual or cities‚Äô future sustainability. Meanwhile, the user data will be collected and delivered to the central server in order to analyze the urban sustainability. Consequently, we can measure the urban sustainability based on a real human interaction, and compare individuals as well as cities. The whole process of this research is presented as a new paradigm of an urban simulator that reflects the urban complexities and the inconstant human mind changes. Specific Objectives of This Paper This paper will represent strategies of the crowdsourcing urban simulation which can make a paradigm shift of urban simulation and shall define the customized sustainable indicators for the initial steps of this research. It shows how as system for can communicate with the public using the current technologies: high performance mobile media, social network services and wide-area geospatial information systems. Furthermore, for the first step of this research, the paper defines the urban sustainability indicators, and their categorization is generalized and translated into simpler ways to support the citizen‚ intuitive understanding.
keywords Crowdsourcing, Urban sustainability, Multi-agent based simulation, Social network services
series CAAD Futures
email shin@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id acadia10_327
id acadia10_327
authors Vassigh, Shahin; Herrera, Silvana
year 2010
title Interactive Teaching through Simulation Environments
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 327-332
summary Spurring new and innovative building design will be critical to the urban energy and economic future of the nation. The operation of completed buildings account for 48% of the nation’s annual greenhouse gas emissions, and 76% of all electricity generated by U.S. power plants goes to supply the building sector. Therefore developing and applying new and innovative sustainable building design will have a measurable impact on the environment. Recent studies show sustainable building design is closely linked to system integration, where various components of a building work in confluence to produce synergetic benefits. As a result, a critical component of sustainable design involves a clear understanding of building systems operation, interaction, and the selection parameters. A consideration of suitable building systems, gauging their interaction, and proposing well integrated systems can lead to producing efficient models of sustainable buildings with minimal impact on the environment. The following paper outlines the progress on a project entitled “Building Literacy: the Integration of Building Technology and Design in Architectural Education.” The project develops a digital tool for teaching/learning architectural technology from an integrated systems perspective. The project attempts to immerse students in a simulated environment that is based on the real life practice of architecture. The project accomplishes this by harnessing the capabilities of simulation and dynamic modeling programs, as well as the state of art graphic media, to create compelling and rewarding reasons for students’ engagement in the lear ning process. The project involves a multidisciplinary team of faculty from Florida International University, University at Buffalo the State University of New York, and Iowa State University and is funded by the US Department of Education for the period of 2007-2011.
keywords educational software, interactive learning, interactive teaching, simulation programs, building performance, building integrated systems,
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email svassigh@fiu.edu
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id cf2011_p109
id cf2011_p109
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Lee Jinkook, Eastman Chuck
year 2011
title Automated Cost Analysis of Concept Design BIM Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 403-418.
summary AUTOMATED COST ANALYSIS OF CONCEPT DESIGN BIM MODELS Interoperability: BIM models and cost models This paper introduces the automated cost analysis developed for the General Services Administration (GSA) and the analysis results of a case study involving a concept design courthouse BIM model. The purpose of this study is to investigate interoperability issues related to integrating design and analysis tools; specifically BIM models and cost models. Previous efforts to generate cost estimates from BIM models have focused on developing two necessary but disjoint processes: 1) extracting accurate quantity take off data from BIM models, and 2) manipulating cost analysis results to provide informative feedback. Some recent efforts involve developing detailed definitions, enhanced IFC-based formats and in-house standards for assemblies that encompass building models (e.g. US Corps of Engineers). Some commercial applications enhance the level of detail associated to BIM objects with assembly descriptions to produce lightweight BIM models that can be used by different applications for various purposes (e.g. Autodesk for design review, Navisworks for scheduling, Innovaya for visual estimating, etc.). This study suggests the integration of design and analysis tools by means of managing all building data in one shared repository accessible to multiple domains in the AEC industry (Eastman, 1999; Eastman et al., 2008; authors, 2010). Our approach aims at providing an integrated platform that incorporates a quantity take off extraction method from IFC models, a cost analysis model, and a comprehensive cost reporting scheme, using the Solibri Model Checker (SMC) development environment. Approach As part of the effort to improve the performance of federal buildings, GSA evaluates concept design alternatives based on their compliance with specific requirements, including cost analysis. Two basic challenges emerge in the process of automating cost analysis for BIM models: 1) At this early concept design stage, only minimal information is available to produce a reliable analysis, such as space names and areas, and building gross area, 2) design alternatives share a lot of programmatic requirements such as location, functional spaces and other data. It is thus crucial to integrate other factors that contribute to substantial cost differences such as perimeter, and exterior wall and roof areas. These are extracted from BIM models using IFC data and input through XML into the Parametric Cost Engineering System (PACES, 2010) software to generate cost analysis reports. PACES uses this limited dataset at a conceptual stage and RSMeans (2010) data to infer cost assemblies at different levels of detail. Functionalities Cost model import module The cost model import module has three main functionalities: generating the input dataset necessary for the cost model, performing a semantic mapping between building type specific names and name aggregation structures in PACES known as functional space areas (FSAs), and managing cost data external to the BIM model, such as location and construction duration. The module computes building data such as footprint, gross area, perimeter, external wall and roof area and building space areas. This data is generated through SMC in the form of an XML file and imported into PACES. Reporting module The reporting module uses the cost report generated by PACES to develop a comprehensive report in the form of an excel spreadsheet. This report consists of a systems-elemental estimate that shows the main systems of the building in terms of UniFormat categories, escalation, markups, overhead and conditions, a UniFormat Level III report, and a cost breakdown that provides a summary of material, equipment, labor and total costs. Building parameters are integrated in the report to provide insight on the variations among design alternatives.
keywords building information modeling, interoperability, cost analysis, IFC
series CAAD Futures
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ecaade2011_099
id ecaade2011_099
authors Ahlquist, Sean; Menges, Achim
year 2011
title Methodological Approach for the Integration of Material Information and Performance in the Design Computation for Tension-Active Architectural Systems
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.799-808
summary As computational design processes have moved from representation to simulation, the focus has shifted towards advanced integration of performance as a form defining measure. Performance, though, is often assessed purely on the level of geometry and stratified between hierarchically independent layers. When looking at tension-active membrane systems, performance is integrated across multiple levels and with only the membrane material itself, defining the structural, spatial and atmospheric qualities. The research described in this paper investigates the integrative nature of this type of lightweight structure and proposes methodologies for generating highly articulated and differentiated systems. As material is a critical component, the research focuses on a system-based approach which places priority on the inclusion of material research and parameterization into a behavior-based computational process.
wos WOS:000335665500092
keywords Material behavior; material computation; system; gestalt; tension-active system
series eCAADe
email sean.ahlquist@icd.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

For more results click below:

this is page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5... show page 7HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_966545 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002