CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 535

_id ascaad2014_016
id ascaad2014_016
authors Al-Ratrout, Samer A. and Rana Zureikat
year 2014
title Pedagogic Approach in the Age of Parametric Architecture: Experimental method for teaching architectural design studio to 3rd year level students
source Digital Crafting [7th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2014 / ISBN 978-603-90142-5-6], Jeddah (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia), 31 March - 3 April 2014, pp. 211-226
summary In this era, Architectural Design Practice is faced with a paradigm shift in its conventional approaches towards computational methods. In this regard, it is considered a pedagogic challenge to boost up knowledge and skills of architectural students’ towards an advanced approach of architectural design that emphasizes the potentials and complexity of computational environments and parametric tools for design problem solving. For introducing the concept of Parametric Oriented Design Methods to 3rd year level architectural students, an experimental pedagogic course was designed in the scholastic year of 2012-2013 at German Jordanian University GJU (School of Architecture and Built Environment SABE) to approach this concept. In the preparation phase, the experimental course was designed to incorporate structured instructing and training method to be consecutively performed within experimental lab environment to target predetermined learning outcomes and goals. The involved students were intentionally classified into three levels of previous involvement associated with the related software operating skills and computational design exposure. In the implementation phase, the predetermined instructing and training procedures were performed in the controlled environment according to the planned tasks and time intervals. Preceded tactics were prepared to be executed to resolve various anticipated complication. In this phase also, students’ performance and comprehension capacity were observed and recorded. In data analysis phase, the observed results were verified and correlations were recognized. In the final phase, conclusions were established and recommendations for further related pedagogic experiments were introduced.
series ASCAAD
email Dr.samer.al-ratrout@fulbrightmail.org
last changed 2016/02/15 12:09

_id ascaad2012_008
id ascaad2012_008
authors Ambrose, Michael A. and Kristen M. Fry
year 2012
title Re:Thinking BIM in the Design Studio - Beyond Tools… Approaching Ways of Thinking
source CAAD | INNOVATION | PRACTICE [6th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2012 / ISBN 978-99958-2-063-3], Manama (Kingdom of Bahrain), 21-23 February 2012, pp. 71-80
summary The application of digital design methods and technologies related to BIM and Integrated Practice Delivery are altering the how and what of architectural design. The way contemporary architecture is conceived and made is being transformed through the digital methods, processes and applications used in BIM. How architectural education and the design studio model evolve to reflect, interpret, translate, or challenge the multiplicitous and simultaneously variable modes of contemporary practice present opportunity and risk to this generation of digital scholars, educators and practitioners. Might we re-conceive the design studio as a venue in which a critical dialogue about how the many facets of architectural design practice are engaged? The possibilities afforded by BIM and Integrated Practice Delivery and digital design technologies are increasingly affecting what we make and simultaneously how we make as architects. Digital modeling of both geometry and information is replacing (or displacing) digital drawing. We see diminishing returns of the value of transforming three-dimensional spatial/formal ideas into two-dimensional conventional abstractions of those complex ideas. This comprehensive thinking promoted by BIM processes is one of the key advantages of using BIM leading to true design innovation. The reiterative learning process of design promoted in BIM promotes a rethinking of design studio education.
series ASCAAD
email ambrosem@umd.edu
more http://www.ascaad.org/conference/2012/papers/ascaad2012_008.pdf
last changed 2012/05/15 18:46

_id ecaade2012_302
id ecaade2012_302
authors Colakoglu, Birgül; Durmisevic, Elma; Pasic, Adnan
year 2012
title International Collaborative Design Studio: Green Transformable Buildings
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 107-114
summary Current trends in architectural practice such as an increased focus on sustainable design, integrated design, and the globalization of architecture are increasing the need for practitioners that are skilled in collaboration. Collaboration fosters innovation and creativity. It is a key operating principle for the 21st century and an important skill that an architecture student must be exposed to. The change in knowledge generation and creative problem solving is transforming education towards collaborative learning forcing architecture and engineering schools to address new course structures with “collaborative” aspect. The work presented in this paper draws its base from collaborative design learning. It describes an international collaborative design studio titled “International Design Studio: Green Transformable Buildings” conducted between three institutions, Y_ld_z Technical University (YTU)–Istanbul, University of Twente (TU)-Enschede Engineering Sciences and Industrial Design School, and Architecture Faculty of Sarajevo (AFS).
wos WOS:000330320600010
keywords Collaborative design; collaborated learning; team work; design process
series eCAADe
email colak@yildiz.edu.tr
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id ascaad2012_003
id ascaad2012_003
authors Elseragy, Ahmed
year 2012
title Creative Design Between Representation and Simulation
source CAAD | INNOVATION | PRACTICE [6th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2012 / ISBN 978-99958-2-063-3], Manama (Kingdom of Bahrain), 21-23 February 2012, pp. 11-12
summary Milestone figures of architecture all have their different views on what comes first, form or function. They also vary in their definitions of creativity. Apparently, creativity is very strongly related to ideas and how they can be generated. It is also correlated with the process of thinking and developing. Creative products, whether architectural or otherwise, and whether tangible or intangible, are originated from ‘good ideas’ (Elnokaly, Elseragy and Alsaadani, 2008). On one hand, not any idea, or any good idea, can be considered creative but, on the other hand, any creative result can be traced back to a good idea that initiated it in the beginning (Goldschmit and Tatsa, 2005). Creativity in literature, music and other forms of art is immeasurable and unbounded by constraints of physical reality. Musicians, painters and sculptors do not create within tight restrictions. They create what becomes their own mind’s intellectual property, and viewers or listeners are free to interpret these creations from whichever angle they choose. However, this is not the case with architects, whose creations and creative products are always bound with different physical constraints that may be related to the building location, social and cultural values related to the context, environmental performance and energy efficiency, and many more (Elnokaly, Elseragy and Alsaadani, 2008). Remarkably, over the last three decades computers have dominated in almost all areas of design, taking over the burden of repetitive tasks so that the designers and students can focus on the act of creation. Computer aided design has been used for a long time as a tool of drafting, however in this last decade this tool of representation is being replaced by simulation in different areas such as simulation of form, function and environment. Thus, the crafting of objects is moving towards the generation of forms and integrated systems through designer-authored computational processes. The emergence and adoption of computational technologies has significantly changed design and design education beyond the replacement of drawing boards with computers or pens and paper with computer-aided design (CAD) computer-aided engineering (CAE) applications. This paper highlights the influence of the evolving transformation from Computer Aided Design (CAD) to Computational Design (CD) and how this presents a profound shift in creative design thinking and education. Computational-based design and simulation represent new tools that encourage designers and artists to continue progression of novel modes of design thinking and creativity for the 21st century designers. Today computational design calls for new ideas that will transcend conventional boundaries and support creative insights through design and into design. However, it is still believed that in architecture education one should not replace the design process and creative thinking at early stages by software tools that shape both process and final product which may become a limitation for creative designs to adapt to the decisions and metaphors chosen by the simulation tool. This paper explores the development of Computer Aided Design (CAD) to Computational Design (CD) Tools and their impact on contemporary design education and creative design.
series ASCAAD
email ahmed.elseragy@aast.edu
more http://www.ascaad.org/conference/2012/papers/ascaad2012_003.pdf
last changed 2012/05/15 18:46

_id ecaade2012_221
id ecaade2012_221
authors Gül, Leman Figen
year 2012
title Educating new generation of architects
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-2-0, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 77-85
summary Recently the developments in and the extensive use of digital design technologies have brought about fundamental changes in the way architects design and represent. As a result of the changing architectural design practise, there have been significant changes in architectural curricula to accommodate new demands, opportunities, processes and potentials provided by advance digital design tools and fabrication-based design techniques. Based on this new demand in design education, a number of additional subjects have been introduced in architectural curricula facilitating the experimentation of free-form /complex design artefact, building components and material attributes. Reported in this paper is the experience of the students as well is a commentary on the quality of the outcomes they achieved whilst confronting this new learning experience. Based on the analysis of collected questionnaire answers, this paper will document the issues that the students experienced during digital design development, the modelling and assembling level as well as in the process of fabrication.
wos WOS:000330322400007
keywords Digital architecture; fabrication; design teaching and learning
series eCAADe
email leman.gul@uni.sydney.edu.au
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id caadria2012_069
id caadria2012_069
authors Kaijima, Sawako
year 2012
title Computer simulation for intuitive structuring
source Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Chennai 25-28 April 2012, pp. 369–378
summary Computer simulation methods have opened up new possibilities for design and research by introducing environments in which we can manipulate and observe. For instance, architects utilise three-dimensional modelling tools to simulate architectural geometries, and engineers use Finite Element software to simulate structural behaviour. Simulation tools make certain aspects of architecture efficient, but, on the other hand, they have brought new types of challenges into the field. One such challenge is the structuring of so-called complex geometries. These forms are often conceived in an environment where gravity, scales, and material are absent and calculated in a model where geometries are frozen and static. As a result, there exists little understanding between the two disciplines in solving the design to come to a well-negotiated form. In the context thereof, our work focuses on the development of interactive simulation environments that induce intuition towards the specific counter-intuitive problem of structuring in the early stages of design. The paper gives insights into aspects of simulation relevant to architectural design and structural engineering. Subsequently, three simulation environments that we have developed are presented to demonstrate our strategies.
keywords Computer simulation; finite element analysis; interactive software
series CAADRIA
email kaijima@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/29 07:34

_id sigradi2012_153
id sigradi2012_153
authors Kaufmann, Stefan; Petzold, Frank
year 2012
title Cybernetic models in building fabrication. A three stage training approach to digital fabrication in architecture
source SIGraDi 2012 [Proceedings of the 16th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Brasil - Fortaleza 13-16 November 2012, pp. 243-245
summary In the time since European architects first began using computers in the building design process, the digital revolution has transformed how architects use planning tools completely. Today, digital tools are an indispensable part of planning practice. Besides a wide variety of digital modeling tools, parametric tools offer architects diverse options for generating cybernetic building models as BIM-models or homeostatic parametric geometry models. Cybernetic models help us to describe the buildings as a system and can improve planning efficiency. The aim of planning is to construct or fabricate an end result. The integration of digital fabrication methods in the digital chain is a fundamental goal if architects are to benefit from the progressive development of computer controlled machine tools. Fabrication integrated digital models can automate the planning process up to the production stage and enable the efficient fabrication of building components. The increased efficiency of planning and fabrication has facilitated a growing proliferation of buildings of increasing geometric complexity. Computers can open a door to the realization of new forms, spaces and construction systems to architects that understand the principles of fabrication-integrated cybernetic modeling.
keywords didactic; parametric design; digital fabrication; CIM;
series SIGRADI
email kaufmann@ai.ar.tum.de
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id ecaade2008_190
id ecaade2008_190
authors Russell, Peter; Elger, Dietrich
year 2008
title The Meaning of BIM
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 531-536
summary The paper is a position paper, not a report about a research project. It concerns the paradigm-shift that is taking place in the CAAD software and its implications for the business of architecture and more importantly, for the education of future members of the profession. Twenty years ago the use of CAAD software as a replacement for hand drafting was starting. Since then the transformation is complete: hardly a final project in the universities is drawn by hand. Currently, we are witnessing a second paradigm shift and its name is BIM. The meaning of BIM is rooted in two significant differences to current CAAD software and this will have implications for teaching and practicing architecture. The first difference is the way the software structures information in the CAAD file. The standard way to save CAAD information was to organise simple geometric objects according to membership in groups and to sort them according to a layer-metaphor, which primarily controlled the visibility of the geometric elements. Three-dimensional modelling is/was nothing more than the same structure with a more complex geometry. BIM software changes this structure by storing classes of geometries and then to store the specific values of individual geometries according to factors that can be determined by external or internal logical factors. The implication for architects is that we have the chance to be the people in control of the building information model, so long as we invest the time and energy to fully understand what is happening to the building information during the planning process. If we ignore this, the real danger exists that the last control of the building’s final configuration will be usurped. As educators we are currently teaching students that will be leaving the schools in 2012 and beyond. By then, the paradigm-shift will be in full motion and so it behoves us to consider which skill sets we want the next generation of architects to possess. This means not just teaching students about how to use particular BIM software or how to program a certain parametric/genetic algorithm in a form-finding process. We need to teach our students to take the leadership in building information management and that means understanding and controlling how the building information flows, how the methodologies that are used by the consulting engineers affect our building models, and knowing what kind of logical inconsistencies (internal or external) can threaten the design intention.
keywords Building Information Modelling, Digital Curriculum, Architectural Pedagogy
series eCAADe
email russell@caad.arch.rwth-aachen.de, elger@koopx.de
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id ecaade2012_275
id ecaade2012_275
authors Sharaidin, Kamil; Burry, Jane; Salim, Flora
year 2012
title Integration of Digital Simulation Tools With Parametric Designs to Evaluate Kinetic Façades for Daylight Performance
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 701-709
summary This research presents a solution for evaluation of kinetic façades system performance via experiences and lessons learnt from experiments. We bridge between architects and engineers to address limitations associated with incorporating performance criteria in the design of kinetic façades by integrating different simulation tools. The experiments focus on optimization of the daylight performance through the design and motion of kinetic façades using various integrated software. The research is developed using real time data feedback processed through various digital tools from three domains: (1) Architectural design, (2) day-lighting performance and (3) parametric design computation. From the evaluations, the paper demonstrates the analysis of kinetic motion for daylight optimization at the early design stage and suggests possible configurations for daylight performance.
wos WOS:000330320600075
keywords Kinetic façades; digital simulations; design considerations; early design stage
series eCAADe
email S3268532@student.rmit.edu.au
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id caadria2012_013
id caadria2012_013
authors Al-Saati, Maha Zeini; David Botta and Robert Woodbury
year 2012
title Moving in filmic spaces: Relating camera movements to spatial archetypes in architectural animations
source Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Chennai 25-28 April 2012, pp. 629–636
summary Architects sometimes use architectural animations to explain their designs. To probe the practice of architectural film/animation, this paper assembles filmic spaces as a conceptual tool that connects spatial archetypes with camera movements.
keywords Architecture; animation; representation; film; camera
series CAADRIA
email malsaati@sfu.ca
last changed 2012/05/29 07:34

_id ecaade2012_284
id ecaade2012_284
authors Ameijde, Jeroen van; Carlin, Brendon
year 2012
title Digital Construction: Automated Design and Construction Experiments Using Customised On-Site Digital Devices
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 439-446
summary This paper presents a currently on-going research trajectory, investigating integrated design and build work-fl ows using generative design strategies and custom built fabrication devices. The aim of the research, which is being developed through a series of experiments and workshops, is to explore scenarios in which these work-flows can produce emergent architectural structures which are highly adapted towards the intended performance within their specifi c context and site. The research has produced a number of installations and prototypical structures which test the practical and theoretical dimensions of the methodology explored. This paper will introduce intriguing new scenarios in which the architects’ role is focused on an indirect, advanced level of control of the process of design, allowing for a more open-ended method of negotiation between structure, users and environment.
wos WOS:000330320600046
keywords Generative design; digital fabrication; customised CNC devices; digital on-site construction
series eCAADe
email Jeroen@s-t-x.net
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id ecaade2012_161
id ecaade2012_161
authors Araujo, Bruno; Jorge, Joaquim; Duarte, Jose
year 2012
title Combining Virtual Environments and Direct Manipulation for Architectural Modeling
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 419-428
summary In this paper we present an environment for conceptual design which mimicsthe interaction of designers with physical mockups. We present novel three dimensional on-and-above-the-surface interactive techniques which combine asymmetric bimanual operations with multi-touch direct manipulation on a fl at surface and depth cameras. These take advantage of a continuous interaction space to create and edit 3D models in a stereoscopic environment. To allow modeling architectural shapes directly, we combine hand and finger tracking in the space above the table with multi-touch on its surface without the need to change modes. This provides an alternative design environment where users can seamlessly switch between interacting on the surface or in the space above it depending on the task, which makes it easier to model complex shapes using simple operations.
wos WOS:000330320600044
keywords 3D Modeling; 3D User Interfaces; Virtual Reality; Procedural Modeling
series eCAADe
email brar@vimmi.inesc-id.pt
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id ecaade2012_290
id ecaade2012_290
authors Barakat, Merate
year 2012
title Urban Acoustic Simulation: Analysis of Urban Public Spaces through Auditory senses
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-2-0, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 587-592
summary This paper explores the sonic characteristics of urban spaces, with the application of apprehending acoustic space and form theory. The theory defines auditory spaces as acoustical arenas, which are spaces defi ned and delineated by sonic events. Historically, cities were built around a soundmark, for example, the resonance of a church bell or propagation of a calling for prayer, or a factory horn. Anyone living beyond the horizon of this soundmark was not considered citizens of that town. Furthermore, the volume of urban sonic arenas depends on natural. Digital simulation is necessary to visualize the ephemeral and temporal nature of sound, within a dynamic immersive environment like urban spaces. This paper digitally analyses the different morphologies of old cities and forms of growth in relation to the sound propagation and ecological effects. An experiment is conducted with the aid of an ancient North-African city model, exposed to a point cloud agent system. By analysing how the sound propagates from the known soundmark through the urban fabric, with the wind pressure interference; the paper compares the theoretical concept of soundmarks and the known perimeter of the ancient city
wos WOS:000330322400060
keywords Urban Public Spaces; Aural Design; Auditory Arena Simulation; Soundmark
series eCAADe
email merate.barakat@aaschool.ac.uk
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id b2f9
id b2f9
authors Bhzad Sidawi and Neveen Hamza
year 2012
title INTELLIGENT KNOWLEDGE-BASED REPOSITORY TO SUPPORT INFORMED DESIGN DECISION MAKING
source ITCON journal
summary Research highlights that architectural design is a social phenomenon that is underpinned by critical analysis of design precedents and the social interaction between designers including negotiation, collaboration and communication. CAAD systems are continuously developing as essential design tools in formulating and developing ideas. Researchers such as (Rosenman, Gero and Oxman 1992) have suggested suggest that knowledge based systems can be integrated with CAAD systems to provide design knowledge that would enable recalling design precedents that maybe linked to the design constraints. Currently CAAD systems are user centric being focused on architects rather than the end product. The systems provide limited assistance in the production of innovative design. Furthermore, the attention of the designers of knowledge based systems is providing a repository rather than a system that is capable to initiate innovation. Most of the CAAD systems have web communication tools that enable designers to communicate their design ideas with colleagues and partners in business. However, none of these systems have the capability to capture useful knowledge from the design negotiations. Students of the third to fifth year at College of Architecture, University of Dammam were surveyed and interviewed to find out how far design tools, communications and resources would impact the production of innovative design projects. The survey results show that knowledge extracted from design negotiations would impact the innovative design outcome. It highlights also that present design precedents are not very helpful and design negotiations between students, tutors and other students are not documented thus fully incorporated into the design scheme. The paper argues that the future CAAD systems should be capable to recognize innovative design precedents, and incorporate knowledge that is resulted from design negotiations. This would help students to gain a critical mass of knowledge that would underpin informed design decisions.
series journal paper
type normal paper
email Bsidawi@ud.edu.sa
more http://www.itcon.org/cgi-bin/works/Show?2012_20
last changed 2012/09/19 11:41

_id ascaad2012_012
id ascaad2012_012
authors Bhzad Sidawi
year 2012
title The Possible Role of CAAD Systems in Initiating Innovation in the Design Studio
source CAAD | INNOVATION | PRACTICE [6th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2012 / ISBN 978-99958-2-063-3], Manama (Kingdom of Bahrain), 21-23 February 2012, pp. 117-128
summary Design is a social phenomenon and the previous research highlights that design precedents and social interaction between designers including negotiation, collaboration and communications is essential to initiate creativity and the production of innovative design products. CAAD systems aim is to help the architect in formulating and developing design ideas. Researchers suggest that knowledge based systems can be integrated with CAAD systems so it would provide the architect with design knowledge that would him/ her to recall design precedents/ solutions thus link it to the design problems. Nevertheless, CAAD systems can provide limited help regarding the production of innovative design. Furthermore, the attention of the designers of knowledge based systems is focused on architects rather than the end product. On the other hand, most of the CAAD systems have web communication tools that enable designers to communicate their with colleagues and partners in business. However, none of these systems have the capability to capture useful knowledge from the design negotiations. Students of the third to fifth year at College of Architecture, University of Dammam were surveyed and interviewed to find out how far design tools, communications and resources would impact the production of innovative design projects. The survey results show that knowledge extracted from design negotiations would impact the innovative design outcome. It highlights also that present design precedents are not very helpful and design negotiations between students, tutors and other students are not documented thus fully incorporated into the design scheme. The paper argues that the future CAAD systems should be capable to recognize innovative design precedents, and incorporate knowledge that is resulted from design negotiations. This would help students to produce innovative design products.
series ASCAAD
email Bsidawi@ud.edu.sa
more http://www.ascaad.org/conference/2012/papers/ascaad2012_012.pdf
last changed 2012/05/15 18:46

_id ascaad2012_019
id ascaad2012_019
authors Blibli, Mustapha; Ammar Bouchair and Faouzi Hannouf
year 2012
title Three Dimensional Reconstitution of an Old Town from Historical Documents: Case of the Medina of Jijel in Algeria
source CAAD | INNOVATION | PRACTICE [6th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2012 / ISBN 978-99958-2-063-3], Manama (Kingdom of Bahrain), 21-23 February 2012, pp. 191; 285-303
summary The three-dimensional reconstitution of cities and urban tissues was the subject of several studies and researches. In order to obtain the acquisition of the geometry of architectural or urban sets, some studies are based on Photogrammetric or on computer vision. Others have focused on the development of tools of acquisition from a laser providing a 3D scatter plot. Some of them yet focused towards the development of CAD software. The automatic generation for morphological 3D representation based on the exploitation of the architectural knowledge basis is also an option. This type of work becomes more relevant and legitimate when it concerns old cities in state of ruin or more simply missing whose remains only prints or literary descriptions similar to our case study; the old town of Jijel that many people ignore its existence. The aim of this work is to achieve a 3D reconstitution of buildings of this town based on historical documents, mostly prints, digitized old maps and plans, as well as literary texts (tales of travelers, military records, and history books). The method developed can solve and generate possible urban volumes in the most frequent cases. The 3D model obtained, despite its geometric simplicity, can view the city from different angles and open new opportunities for research in history, architecture and town planning.
series ASCAAD
email musblibli@gmail.com
more http://www.ascaad.org/conference/2012/papers/ascaad2012_019.pdf
last changed 2012/05/15 18:46

_id sigradi2012_88
id sigradi2012_88
authors Borda, Adriane; Pires, Janice; de Vasconselos, Tássia Borges
year 2012
title O Desenho (didático) para o Insight [Drawing didactic for Insight]
source SIGraDi 2012 [Proceedings of the 16th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Brasil - Fortaleza 13-16 November 2012, pp. 277-280
summary Knowledge of geometric drawing, hitherto considered previous in the training context in architecture, has little emphasis in the school curriculum. In the context this work, were recognized approaches such as shape grammar, which explain design practices, unveiling relationships of the geometric form. It was also identified practices of the Gestalt, established under the modern architecture, which sought to stimulate the student to have insights to think about geometric structures implicit in the form. From these references and digital tools, it is demonstrated the types of concepts and some of the exercises that are being used for the configuration of an learning for the insight.
keywords Geometric drawing, insight, architectural design.
series SIGRADI
email tassiav.arq@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2012_291
id sigradi2012_291
authors Braida, Frederico; Marques, Aline Calazans; Pedroso, Emmanuel Sá Resende; Lima, Fernando Tadeu de Araújo
year 2012
title O papel das impressoras 3D nas diversas etapas do projeto [O papel das impressoras 3D nas diversas etapas do projeto The 3D printer paper at various stages of project]
source SIGraDi 2012 [Proceedings of the 16th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Brasil - Fortaleza 13-16 November 2012, pp. 580-583
summary This article aims to address the use of 3D printers in the stages of design, development and final presentation in projects of architecture and urbanism. To evaluate the performance of 3D printers, we emphasize in each of these stages of the project, the representational demands and cognitive processes involved as well as analytical categories taken as cost, running time, accuracy and level finish, the representation of materials, scale and size of three-dimensional models and possibilities for intervention in the models themselves.
keywords Impressoras 3D; Prototipagem rápida; Projeto; Fabricação Digital; Modelagem tridimensional
series SIGRADI
email frederico.braida@ufjf.edu.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id caadria2012_025
id caadria2012_025
authors Braumann, Johannes and Sigrid Brell-Cokcan
year 2012
title Digital and physical computing for industrial robots in architecture: Interfacing Arduino with industrial robots
source Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Chennai 25-28 April 2012, pp. 317–326
summary Customisation is one of the most important topics in architecture, as architects generally work on individual prototypes instead of mass-produced designs. By using customised design and fabrication tools, architects are able to individually respond to challenges, instead of relying on universal software tools. This paper proposes new software components for interfacing industrial robots with physical computing microcontrollers, thereby allowing the customisation of physical tools for industrial robots. By pairing physical computing with rapid prototyping, architects are able to design and prototype individual fabrication processes for industrial robots.
keywords Industrial robots; physical computing; interfaces; rapid prototyping; computer aided manufacturing
series CAADRIA
email robots@robotsinarchitecture.com
last changed 2012/05/29 07:34

_id ecaade2012_100
id ecaade2012_100
authors Braumann, Johannes; Brell-Cokcan, Sigrid
year 2012
title Real-Time Robot Simulation and Control for Architectural Design
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 479-486
summary Industrial robots for architectural fabrication have not yet been directly linked to the design process, as current research focuses mostly on the automated generation of robot control data for mass customization. In this paper, we will discuss the use of a real-time programming environment for robot simulation/control and introduce a virtual robot, that allows architects to digitally prototype fabrication processes. While such a real-time approach is also suitable for mass customization, the main advantage is that this interaction with the virtual-robot can be used to intuitively solve complex fabrication problems.
wos WOS:000330320600050
keywords Industrial Robots; Inverse Kinematics; Virtual Robot; Mass Customization; Simulation; Parametric Design
series eCAADe
email johannes@robotsinarchitecture.org
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

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