CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 527

_id acadia12_199
id acadia12_199
authors Beorkrem, Chris ; Corte, Dan
year 2012
title Zero-Waste, Flat-Packed, Tri-Chord Truss: Continued Investigations of Structural Expression in Parametric Design"
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 199-208
summary The direct and rapid connections between scripting, modeling and prototyping allow for investigations of computation in fabrication. The manipulation of planar materials with two-dimensional CNC cuts can easily create complex and varied forms, volumes, and surfaces. However, the bulk of research on folding using CNC fabrication tools is focused upon surfaces, self-supporting walls and shell structures, which do not integrate well into more conventional building construction models. This paper attempts to explain the potential for using folding methodologies to develop structural members through a design-build process. Conventional building practice consists of the assembly of off-the-shelf parts. Many times, the plinth, skeleton, and skin are independently designed and fabricated, integrating multiple industries. Using this method of construction as an operative status quo, this investigation focused on a single structural component: the truss. Using folding methodologies and sheet steel to create a truss, this design investigation employed a recyclable and prolific building material to redefine the fabrication of a conventional structural member. The potential for using digital design and two-dimensional CNC fabrication tools in the design of a foldable truss from sheet steel is viable in the creation of a flat-packed, minimal waste structural member that can adapt to a variety of aesthetic and structural conditions. Applying new methods to a component of the conventional ‘kit of parts’ allowed for a novel investigation that recombines zero waste goals, flat-packing potential, structural expression and computational processes. This paper will expand (greatly) upon previous research into bi-chord truss designs, developing a tri-chord truss, which is parametrically linked to its structural moment diagram. The cross section of each truss is formed based on the loading condition for each beam. This truss design has been developed through a thorough series of analytical models and tests performed digitally, to scale and in full scale. The tri-chord truss is capable of resisting rotational failures well beyond the capacity of the bi-chord designs previously developed. The results are complex, and elegant expressions of structural logics embodied in a tightly constrained functional design.
keywords Parametric Design , Structural Expression , Material constraints
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email cbeorkrem@uncc.edu
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia12_383
id acadia12_383
authors Feringa, Jelle
year 2012
title Implicit Fabrication, Fabrication Beyond Craft: The Potential of Turing Completeness in Construction"
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 383-390
summary This paper addresses the limited shared vocabulary of landscape architecture and architectural design, evident in the application of terms such as “spatial design” and “spatial planning.” In their current usage, such terms emphasize the visible, terrestrial, pedestrian-perspective level, often to the absolute exclusion of a spatial, i.e., volumetric comprehension of the environment. This deficit is acutely evident in the teaching of landscape architecture and architecture and discussion of these fields’ shared ground. The dominant document type for mapping such analysis and design is the plan, or three-dimensional representations of the same, restricted to an extrusion or height map. GIS techniques in spatial design tend to be weighted toward visual, surface-based data (slope analysis, exposure, viewshed, etc.). Within this domain, our goal is to transform aspects of the intangible—the characteristics of open space itself—into a form that is legible, quantifiable, and malleable.
keywords evolutionary fabrication , computer vision , robotics , self-assembly , stigmergy
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email jelleferinga@gmail.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia12_365
id acadia12_365
authors Tibbits, Skylar
year 2012
title The Self-Assembly Line
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 365-372
summary As disciplines converge and programmablity becomes ubiquitous from the nano-scale to the human-scale, architecture and construction will likely inherit new processes from design tools, materials, fabrication and construction. This paper outlines the key ingredients for self-assembly and computational construction through a recent project, The Self-Assembly line. This project was commissioned for the 2012 TED Conference, described as “an installation that builds installations,” and was built to show autonomous self-assembly at furniture-scales. A new intuition is proposed for the construction of large-scale structures and gives insight for potentially expanding a designer’s role in self-assembly processes outside of the discipline of architecture. Future applications are outlined for self-assembly and programmable materials at large-scale lengths.
keywords Self-Assembly , Programmable materials/matter , Computational Construction , Intelligent Building Materials
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email tibbits2@gmail.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id ecaade2012_163
id ecaade2012_163
authors Barbosa, Wilson; Araújo, André; Carvalho, Guilherme; Celani, Gabriela
year 2012
title Samba Reception Desk: Compromising Aesthetics, Fabrication and Structural Performance in the Design Process
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 255-263
summary The present paper describes an integrative design experiment in which different types of models were used in order to achieve a design that compromises aesthetics, lightness, fabrication, assembly and structural performance. It shows how an integrative approach, through the use of both virtual and physical models, can provide valuable feedback in different phases of the design and fabrication process. It was possible to conclude that the design method used allowed solving many problems and had a significant impact in the resulting object.
wos WOS:000330320600025
keywords Design process; structural analysis; parametric design; digital fabrication; integrative design; models in design
series eCAADe
email wbarbosa@fec.unicamp.br
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id ecaade2012_5
id ecaade2012_5
authors Biloria, Nimish; Chang, Jia-Rey
year 2012
title HyperCell: A Bio-Inspired Information Design Framework for Real-Time Adaptive Spatial Components
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 573-581
summary Contemporary explorations within the evolutionary computational domain have been heavily instrumental in exploring biological processes of adaptation, growth and mutation. On the other hand a plethora of designers owing to the increasing sophistication in computer aided design software are equally enthused by the formal aspects of biological organisms and are thus meticulously involved in form driven design developments. This focus on top-down appearance and surface condition based design development under the banner of organic architecture in essence contributes to the growing misuse of bio-inspired design and the inherent meaning associated with the terminology. HyperCell, a bio-inspired information design framework for real-time adaptive spatial components, is an ongoing research, at Hyperbody, TU Delft, which focuses on extrapolating bottom-up generative design and real-time interaction based adaptive spatial re-use logics by understanding processes of adaptation, multi-performance and self sustenance in natural systems. Evolutionary developmental biology is considered as a theoretical basis for this research.
wos WOS:000330320600061
keywords Adaptation; Swarms; Evo-Devo; Simulation: Cellular component
series eCAADe
email N.M.Biloria@tudelft.nl
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id ascaad2012_022
id ascaad2012_022
authors Borham, Ahmad; Lobna Sherif and Osama Tolba
year 2012
title Resilient Rules - Culture and Computation in Traditional Built Environments
source CAAD | INNOVATION | PRACTICE [6th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2012 / ISBN 978-99958-2-063-3], Manama (Kingdom of Bahrain), 21-23 February 2012, pp. 211-221
summary This study explores the influence of the socio-cultural rules, based upon Islamic jurisprudence (fiqh), on the complexity of the traditional built environment. This system of rules organized the societal activities, including decisions and activities related to design and construction in the Arab-Islamic city. Considering the city as a complex system, the study will try to show how this rules system made the Arab-Islamic city resilient and adaptive. Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) are non-linear, self-organizing systems that have the ability to adapt to changing conditions through changing the rules that organize the random autonomous interactions between agents in the environment. This adaptation takes place through gradual gained experience that is reflected in the behavior of agents. This study attempts to interrelate different bodies of literature (Complexity/Chaos theory and built environment studies) in a single framework that aims to show that the socio-cultural rules system based on fiqh was a major factor in the resilience of the traditional built environment. These interrelations are illustrated using a graph called Computational Rules Graph (CRG). The CRG relates the traditional rules system to attributes of complex systems in a graph that can be modeled computationally. Traditional rules (codes of conduct) are proscriptive (non-deterministic), defining what is prohibited, thereby producing autonomous environments where agents had control over their immediate environment. In comparison, contemporary rules of the built environment (building codes) are prescriptive (deterministic), subscribing definite actions that need to take place by the stake-holder (agent) neglecting user needs and preferences. The application of these traditional rules system increased the agent’s autonomy and freedom of action. It also helped establish stronger social networks among agents, which resulted in a resilient environment.
series ASCAAD
email vaborhamz@gmail.com
more http://www.ascaad.org/conference/2012/papers/ascaad2012_022.pdf
last changed 2012/05/15 18:46

_id acadia12_511
id acadia12_511
authors Borowski, Darrick ; Poulimeni, Nikoletta ; Janssen, Jeroen
year 2012
title Edible Infrastructures: Emergent Organizational Patterns for the Productive City
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 511-526
summary Edible Infrastructures is an investigation into a projective mode of urbanism which considers food as an integral part of a city's metabolic infrastructure. Working with algorithms as design tools, we explore the generative potential of such a system to create an urban ecology that: provides for its residents via local, multi-scalar, distributed food production, reconnects urbanites with their food sources, and de-couples food costs from fossil fuels by limiting transportation at all levels, from source to table. The research is conducted through the building up of a sequence of algorithms, beginning with the ‘Settlement Simulation’, which couples consumers to productive surface area within a cellular automata type computational model. Topological analysis informs generative operations, as each stage builds on the output of the last. In this way we explore the hierarchical components for a new Productive City, including: the structure and programming of the urban circulatory network, an emergent urban morphology based around productive urban blocks, and opportunities for new architectural typologies. The resulting prototypical Productive City questions the underlying mechanisms that shape modern urban space and demonstrates the architectural potential of mathematical modeling and simulation in addressing complex urban spatial and programmatic challenges.
keywords Urban Agriculture , Urban Ecologies and Food Systems , Productive Cities , Urban Metabolism , Computational Modeling and Simulation , Algorithmic/ Procedural Design Methodologies , Emergent Organization , Self-Organizing Systems
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email darrick.borowski@gmail.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id ecaade2012_058
id ecaade2012_058
authors Bus, Peter
year 2012
title Emergence as a Design Strategy in Urban Development: Using Agent-Oriented Modelling in Simulation of Reconfiguration of the Urban Structure
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-2-0, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 599-605
summary Agent-oriented modelling is one of the simulation methods for emergent behavior of a complex system that could be considered for application of urban city structures. Using advanced script techniques, the behavior and evolution of structures in the bottom-up strategies for the development of environment could be simulated in architecture and urbanism as well. The paper presents a research subproject in the area of verifi cation of the processes of spatial and social interaction of the agents according to the logic of defined intrinsic rules of Swarm behavior in the simulation model of the selected area. The research builds mainly upon two selected requirements of the bottom-up strategy: the approach distances to places of interest and mutual standoff distances between urban elements.
wos WOS:000330322400062
keywords Emergence; simulation; self-organization process; agent-oriented modelling
series eCAADe
email buspeter@fa.cvut.cz
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id ecaade2012_60
id ecaade2012_60
authors Dierichs, Karola; Menges Achim
year 2012
title Material and Machine Computation of Designed Granular Matter: Rigid-Body Dynamics Simulations as a Design Tool for Robotically-Poured Aggregate Structures Consisting of Polygonal Concave Particles
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 711-719
summary Loose granulates are a relevant yet rarely deployed architectural material system. Their significance lies in their capacity to combine fluid-like amorphousness with solid-like rigidity, resulting in potential architectural structures capable of continuous reconfi guration. In addition aggregates allow for functional grading. Especially if custom designed concave particles are used, full-scale architectural structures can be poured using a six-axis industrial robot, combining the precise travel of the emitter-head with the self-organizational capacity of granular substances. In this context, the paper proposes Rigid-Body Dynamics (RBD) simulations as a design-tool for the robotic pouring of loose granular structures. The notions of material and machine computation are introduced and RBD is explained in greater detail. A set of small tests is conducted to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of a specifi c RBD software. Conclusively, further areas of research are outlined.
wos WOS:000330320600076
keywords Material and machine computation; aggregate architectures; designed granulates; robotic pouring; Rigid-Body Dynamics
series eCAADe
email karola.dierichs@icd.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id acadia12_169
id acadia12_169
authors Helm, Volker ; Ercan, Selen ; Gramazio, Fabio ; Kohler, Matthias
year 2012
title In-Situ Robotic Construction: Extending the Digital Fabrication Chain in Architecture
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 169-176
summary In this paper, viable applications of mobile robotic units on construction sites are explored. While expanding on potential objectives for in-situ fabrication in the construction sector, the intention is also to build upon innovative man-machine interaction paradigms to deal with the imprecision and tolerances often faced on construction sites. By combining the precision of the machine with the cognitive environmental human skills, a simple but effective mobile fabrication system is experimented for the building of algorithmically designed additive assemblies that would not be possible through conventional manual methods if the large amount of individual building blocks and the size of the structure to be built are taken into account. It is believed that this new approach to man-machine collaboration, aimed at a deeper integration of human ability with the strengths of digitally controlled machines, will result in advances in the construction sector, thus opening up new design and application fields for architects and planners.
keywords in-situ robotic fabrication , mobile robotics , 1:1 scale fabrication , additive assembly , algorithmically designed structures , man-machine interaction , cognitive , object recognition , construction site
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email helm@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia12_315
id acadia12_315
authors Imbern, Matias ; Raspall, Felix ; Su, Qi
year 2012
title Tectonic Tessellations: A Digital Approach to Ceramic Structural Surfaces
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 315-321
summary From the beginning of digital revolution, structural surfaces drew significant attention as a realm that interweaves formal explorations, form-finding and structural optimization. However, after successful experimentation in the virtual domain, it became evident that some of the main challenges lay on how to translate these structural forms into architectural assemblies at the scale of buildings. The development of digital fabrication is crucial in this task, as means to overcome traditional constraints such as need for modular pieces, scaffolding and optimal assembly sequences.This research focuses on digital workflows that combine form finding with robotic fabrication, surface tessellation and panelization. In the past years, the use of digital tools to assemble identical modules into complex formations has achieved significant results for loadbearing walls. Expanding this line of research, the proposed fabrication system carries these experiments on additive fabrication into the production of structural surfaces. The assembly sequence involves a two-step fabrication: off-site panel manufacturing and on-site assembly. The main components of the system consist of two triangular ceramic pieces that provide structural resistance, refined surface finish, and formwork for thin reinforced-concrete layer. Panelization strategies reduce the requirements on-site work and formwork.The paper describes background research, concept, construction process, methodology, results and conclusions.
keywords Digital Fabrication , Complex Geometry , Reinforced Ceramic , Structural Surfaces , Reduced Formwork
series ACADIA
type panel paper
email mbimbern@hotmail.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia12_277
id acadia12_277
authors Kelley, Thomas ; Blankenbaker, Sarah
year 2012
title Smart Disassembly: Or, How I Learned to Take Things Apart"
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 277-283
summary Taking things apart is easy. How something works, or even what it is, is irrelevant to its dismantling. If assembly can be perceived as a rational act, then disassembly is certainly its counterpart: an intuitive, foolproof, and mindless errand of the seemingly curious subject. It is in this unflattering description, however, that disassembly warrants an analysis of its smart potential Smart Disassemblies locates the exploded view drawing, a representation that conveys the instructions for assembly, within its architectural legacy, from its origins in the Renaissance to its more contemporary appropriation by Thom Mayne and Daniel Libeskind. The categorical rules, and the part-to-whole relationships they imply, gleaned from these precedents are then subverted toward the end of disassembling an object. The proposed rule sets (Point of Explosion, Point of View, and Explosion Sequence) and their variants are tested through their application to a complex assembly of objects, a jazz quintet.
keywords part-to-whole , smart assembly , synthetic tectonics
series ACADIA
type panel paper
email thom.j.kelley@gmail.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id ecaade2012_65
id ecaade2012_65
authors Kontovourkis, Odysseas
year 2012
title Virtual Forces in Design and Fabrication Process: Assembly and Construction of Physical Prototypes
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 133-141
summary This paper demonstrates a preliminary research and teaching investigation that attempts to use virtual forces in order to achieve interaction behavior between individual components as mechanism for the development of physical prototypes in various scales. Through case studies, the current research examines possibilities for the design of global systems, structural components and joints aiming to construct prototypes that can be characterized by continuity in their forms, structures and materials. In parallel, a number of questions are raised. Is the process from design to fabrication linear? What can be the relation between digital and physical processes? In which level this integration can be achieved? This work attempts to investigate the application of such methodology, both in design and fabrication, and to examine its contribution in the design and construction process.
wos WOS:000330320600013
keywords Virtual forces; assembly; construction; physical prototypes
series eCAADe
email kontovourkis.odysseas@ucy.ac.cy
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id acadia13_137
id acadia13_137
authors Kretzer, Manuel; In, Jessica; Letkemann, Joel; Jaskiewicz, Tomasz
year 2013
title Resinance: A (Smart) Material Ecology
source ACADIA 13: Adaptive Architecture [Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-926724-22-5] Cambridge 24-26 October, 2013), pp. 137-146
summary What if we had materials that weren’t solid and static like traditional building materials are? What if these materials could dynamically change and adapt to varying environmental situations and stimulations and evolve and learn over time? What if they were autonomous, self-sufficient and independent but could communicate with each other and exchange information? What would this “living matter” mean for architecture and the way we perceive the built environment? This paper looks briefly at current concepts and investigations in regards to programmable matter that occupy various areas of architectural research. It then goes into detail in describing the most recent smart material installation “Resinance” that was supervised by Manuel Kretzer and Benjamin Dillenburger and realized by the 2012/13 Master of Advanced Studies class as part of the materiability research at the Chair for CAAD, ETH Zürich in March 2013. The highly speculative sculpture links approaches in generative design, digital fabrication, physical/ubiquitous computing, distributed networks, swarm behavior and agent-based communication with bioinspiration and organic simulation in a responsive entity that reacts to user input and adapts its behavior over time.
keywords Smart Materials; Distributed Networks; Digital Fabrication; Physical Computing; Responsive Environment
series ACADIA
type Normal Paper
email kretzer@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2014/01/11 08:13

_id ecaade2012_95
id ecaade2012_95
authors Ladurner, Georg; Gabler, Markus; Menges, Achim; Knippers, Jan
year 2012
title Interactive Form-Finding for Biomimetic Fibre Structures: Development of a Computational Design Tool and Physical Fabrication Technique Based on the Biological Structure of the Lichen
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 519-529
summary This contribution shows a biomimetic approach to design and produce fibrous structural elements derived from the morphology of the biologic archetype ‘the lichen’. The physical form fi nding strategy allows for a novel self-organised reinforcement for fibrous composite systems. A computational design tool has been developed, based on the fi ndings of various physical models. The digital device allows for shape control and therefore an interaction to and manipulation of the fabrication process. Since the form fi nding algorithms of the tool are based on physical experiments,every geometry is derived through the program and has its counterpart in production. For example: the fibre density in the model can be adjusted which leads to different geometries. In production the chosen denseness is utilised, thus, the production yields automatically to the desired load-optimized geometry found in the form-finding tool.
wos WOS:000330320600055
keywords Biomimetics; Form-finding; Self-organization; Emergence; Fibre structures
series eCAADe
email georg.ladurner@gmail.com
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id caadria2012_110
id caadria2012_110
authors McGee, Wes; David Pigram and Maciej P. Kaczynski
year 2012
title Robotic reticulations: A method for the integration of multi-axis fabrication processes with algorithmic form-finding techniques
source Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Chennai 25-28 April 2012, pp. 295–304
summary This paper addresses the design and fabrication of non-uniform structural shell systems. Structural shells, particularly gridshells, have a long history but due to their complexity and the accompanying high cost of construction, their application has been limited. The research proposes a method for integrating the design and fabrication processes such that complex double curved reticulated frames can be constructed efficiently, from prefabricated components, requiring significantly less formwork than is typical. A significant aspect of the method has been the development of software tools that allow for both algorithmic form-finding and the direct control of robotic fabrication equipment from within the same modelling package. A recent case-study is examined where the methodology has been applied to construct a reticulated shell structure in the form of a partial vault. Components were prefabricated using 6-axis robotic fabrication equipment. Individual parts are designed such that the assembly of components guides the form of the vault, requiring no centring to create the desired shape. Algorithmically generated machine instructions controlled a sequence of three tool changes for each part, using a single modular fixture, greatly increasing accuracy. The complete integration of computational design techniques and fabrication methodologies now enables the economical deployment of non-uniform structurally optimised reticulated frames.
keywords Reticulated frame; robotic fabrication; dynamic relaxation; form-finding; computational design
series CAADRIA
email david.pigram@uts.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/29 07:34

_id ecaade2012_82
id ecaade2012_82
authors Mohammad, Kareem El Sayed; Hanafi, Mohammad Assem; Nasr, Mohammad
year 2012
title A Closer Perspective on Fabrication Realities
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 169-179
summary Digital Fabrication has arguably stirred the return of the architect to the long-held position as a master builder. The close engagement with materials offered by the digital fabrication technologies places necessary limitations and calls the architects for a deeper understanding of and awareness about the fabrication realities during the design process. The research conducted uses parametric modeling for the alteration of the design according to a wide range of infl uences, one of which is fabrication. This paper offers a close perspective on some fabrication necessities and limitations that emerged through the manufacturing of a number of scaled models of a parametrically designed shed and a full scale pavilion. The scope of this work falls into the realm of physical testing, tolerance, structure and assembly. It also points out the fabrication parameters that were part of the digital setting used to create the physical models. The paper argues that craft is still practically alive when deploying digital technologies as it has been ever present in the pre-digital era.
wos WOS:000330320600017
keywords Digital fabrication; tolerances; parametric design; assembly; Laser cutting
series eCAADe
email arch_kareem_elsayed@yahoo.com
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id acadia12_79
id acadia12_79
authors Nicholas, Paul ; Tamke, Martin ; Thomsen, Matte Ramsgard ; Jungjohann, Hauke ; Markov, Ivan
year 2012
title Graded Territories: Towards the Design, Specification and Simulation of Materially Graded Bending Active Structures"
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 79-86
summary The ability to make materials with bespoke behavior affords new perspectives on incorporating material properties within the design process not available through natural materials. This paper reports the design and assembly of two bending-active, fibre-reinforced composite structures. Within these structures, the property of bending is activated and varied through bespoke material means so as to match a desired form. Within the architectural design process, formal control depends upon design approaches for material specification and simulation that consider behavior at the level of the material element as well as the structure. We describe an evolving approach to material specification and simulation, and highlight the digital and material considerations that frame the process.
keywords graded materials , composite materials , bending-active structures , material properties , material behaviour , simulation , material specification , performance-based design
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email Paul.Nicholas@kadk.dk
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id ecaade2012_93
id ecaade2012_93
authors Nicholas, Paul; Tamke, Martin
year 2012
title Composite Territories: Engaging a Bespoke Material Practice in Digitally Designed Materials
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 691-699
summary Today, material performance is regarded as one of the richest sources of innovation. Accordingly, architecture is shifting to practices by which the computational generation of form is directly driven by material characteristics. At the same time, there is a growing technological means for the varied composition of material, an extension of the digital chain that foregrounds a new need to engage materials at multiple scales within the design process. Recognising that the process of making materials affords perspectives not available with found materials, this paper reports the design and assembly of the fi bre reinforced composite structure Composite Territories, in which the property of bending is activated and varied so as to match solely through material means a desired form. This case study demonstrates how one might extend the geometric model so that it is able to engage and reconcile physical parameters that occur at different scales.
wos WOS:000330320600074
keywords Composites; Material properties; Multi-scale
series eCAADe
email paul.nicholas@kadk.dk
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id caadria2012_099
id caadria2012_099
authors Peinovich, Ella and John Fernández
year 2012
title Localised design-manufacture for developing countries: A methodology for creating culturally sustainable architecture using CAD/CAM
source Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Chennai 25-28 April 2012, pp. 285–294
summary This paper demonstrates the production of endogenous solutions for global development when applying local workforce skills in the design-manufacturing process using available computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) tools. The methodology outlined in this paper improves technology uptake in developing countries by promoting localisation of the design-manufacture process coupled with local knowledge to promote culturally sustainable technology dissemination. This paper documents a set of design rules and manufacturing methods used to create precision moulds with locally available CAD/CAM tools. The moulds shown here were used by local craftsmen in the casting and construction of a prototypical precast architectural system deployed in the urban slums around Nairobi, Kenya.
keywords CAD/CAM; CNC; cultural sustainability; assembly systems; global manufacturing
series CAADRIA
email ella_p@mit.edu
last changed 2012/05/29 07:34

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