CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 1 to 20 of 530

_id ecaade2012_002
id ecaade2012_002
authors Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejdan, Dana (eds.)
year 2012
title Physical Digitality
source Proceedings of the 30th International Conference on Education and research in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe - Volume 2 [ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7], Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, 714 p.
summary Physical Digitality is the second volume of the conference proceedings of the 30th eCAADe conference, held from 12-14 september 2012 in Prague at the Faculty of Architecture of Czech Technical University in Prague. The companion volume is called Digital Physicality. Together, both volumes contain 154 papers that were submitted to this conference. Digitality is the condition of living in a world where ubiquitous information and communication technology is embedded in the physical world. Although it is possible to point out what is “digital” and what is “real,” the distinction has become pointless, and it has no more explanatory power for our environment, buildings, and behaviour. Material objects are invested with communication possibilities, teams are communicating even when not together, and buildings can sense and respond to the environment, each other, and to inhabitants. Digital is no longer an add-on, extra, or separate software. Reality is partly digital and partly physical. The implication of this condition is not clear however, and it is necessary to investigate its potential. New strategies are necessary that acknowledge the synergetic qualities of the physical and the digital. This is not limited to our designs but it also infl uences the process, methods, and what or how we teach. The subdivision of papers in these volumes follow the distinction made in the conference theme. The papers in Physical Digitality have their orientation mainly in the physical realm, and reach towards the digital part. It has to be granted that this distinction is rather crude, because working from two extremes (digital versus physical) tends to ignore the arguably most interesting middle ground.
keywords Digital physicality; physical digitality
series eCAADe
email ecaade2012@fa.cvut.cz
last changed 2014/04/07 05:53

_id acadia12_391
id acadia12_391
authors Ajlouni, Rima
year 2012
title The Forbidden Symmetries
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 391-400
summary The emergence of quasi-periodic tiling theories in mathematics and material science is revealing a new class of symmetry, which had never been accessible before. Because of their astounding visual and structural properties, quasi-periodic symmetries can be ideally suited for many applications in art and architecture; providing a rich source of ideas for articulating form, pattern, surface and structure. However, since their discovery, the unique long-range order of quasi-periodic symmetries, is still posing a perplexing puzzle. As rule-based systems, the ability to algorithmically generate these complicated symmetries can be instrumental in understanding and manipulating their geometry. Recently, the discovery of quasi-periodic patterns in ancient Islamic architecture is providing a unique example of how ancient mathematics can inform our understanding of some basic theories in modern science. The recent investigation into these complex and chaotic formations is providing evidence to show that ancient designers, by using the most primitive tools (a compass and a straightedge) were able to resolve the complicated long-range principles of ten-fold quasi-periodic formations. Derived from these ancient principles, this paper presents a computational model for describing the long-range order of octagon-based quasi-periodic formations. The objective of the study is to design an algorithm for constructing large patches of octagon-based quasi-crystalline formations. The proposed algorithm is proven to be successful in producing an infinite and defect-free covering of the two-dimensional plane.
keywords computational model , quasi-crystalline , symmetries , algorithms , complex geometry
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email rima.ajlouni@ttu.edu
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id sigradi2012_149
id sigradi2012_149
authors Diniz, Nancy; Anderson, Bennedict; Liang, Hai-Ning; Laing, Richard
year 2012
title Mapping the Experience of Space
source SIGraDi 2012 [Proceedings of the 16th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Brasil - Fortaleza 13-16 November 2012, pp. 550-553
summary This paper aims to contribute to the discussion and our understanding of time-based mapping of visual information. Our approach is to enhance the traditional contextual static analysis through the acknowledgement of the body and the senses as key indicators of perceptual spatial experience. The time-based mapping paradigms have produced different ways of designing space by leveraging perceptual and other sensorial understanding, leading to the formation of variables (or parameters) which at the same time turn themselves as catalysts for other variables. The potential for a constantly evolving reinterpretation of the perceptual experience and for associated paradigm to shift suggest a multiplicity of design possibilities for urban areas that also need to adapt to the new requirements of contemporary living. In essence, the paper will bring to light the deployment of tools (digital and analogue) to turn static invisible data to dynamic visible data. In other words, we want to explore how the data can be treated as a generative system, enabling students and tutors alike to experience space which accounts for sensory performances and behaviours within the space.
keywords Time-based design processes; dynamic data visualization; digital pedagogies, phenomenology, design process
series SIGRADI
email Nancy.Diniz@xjtlu.edu.cn
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id ecaade2012_254
id ecaade2012_254
authors Tramontano, Marcelo; Monaco dos Santos, Denise
year 2012
title Hybrid Territories Project: Cultural Actions and Digital Media
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 649-656
wos WOS:000330320600070
summary This paper presents the Hybrid Territory Project, a cultural public policies research project carried ou by Nomads.usp, the Center for Studies of Interactive Living, of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. The central theme of the project is to understand how public cultural policies can make use of digital media in an effort to connect people and groups living in social realities apart from each other. The project seeks to bring physical and virtual instances together by means of cultural actions in urban areas. Moreover, it aims to design coexistence from joint work carried out by diverse actors, including architects, who have a voice in defi ning the project goals, actions, and methods. It is expected that the project will provide strategies for public policies to lay down conditions favoring the coexistence of differences in cities as enriching and desirable.
keywords Public policies; digital media; communities; cultural actions
series eCAADe
email tramont@sc.usp.br
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id ascaad2012_019
id ascaad2012_019
authors Blibli, Mustapha; Ammar Bouchair and Faouzi Hannouf
year 2012
title Three Dimensional Reconstitution of an Old Town from Historical Documents: Case of the Medina of Jijel in Algeria
source CAAD | INNOVATION | PRACTICE [6th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2012 / ISBN 978-99958-2-063-3], Manama (Kingdom of Bahrain), 21-23 February 2012, pp. 191; 285-303
summary The three-dimensional reconstitution of cities and urban tissues was the subject of several studies and researches. In order to obtain the acquisition of the geometry of architectural or urban sets, some studies are based on Photogrammetric or on computer vision. Others have focused on the development of tools of acquisition from a laser providing a 3D scatter plot. Some of them yet focused towards the development of CAD software. The automatic generation for morphological 3D representation based on the exploitation of the architectural knowledge basis is also an option. This type of work becomes more relevant and legitimate when it concerns old cities in state of ruin or more simply missing whose remains only prints or literary descriptions similar to our case study; the old town of Jijel that many people ignore its existence. The aim of this work is to achieve a 3D reconstitution of buildings of this town based on historical documents, mostly prints, digitized old maps and plans, as well as literary texts (tales of travelers, military records, and history books). The method developed can solve and generate possible urban volumes in the most frequent cases. The 3D model obtained, despite its geometric simplicity, can view the city from different angles and open new opportunities for research in history, architecture and town planning.
series ASCAAD
email musblibli@gmail.com
more http://www.ascaad.org/conference/2012/papers/ascaad2012_019.pdf
last changed 2012/05/15 18:46

_id acadia12_325
id acadia12_325
authors Chronis, Angelos ; Tsigkari, Martha ; Davis, Adam ; Aish, Francis
year 2012
title Design Systems, Ecology, and Time Angelos Chronis, Martha Tsigkari, Adam Davis, Francis Aish"
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 325-332
summary Discussion of architecture in ecological terms usually focuses on the spatial and material dimensions of design practice. Yet there is an equally critical temporal dimension in ecology that is just as relevant to design. At the micro scale is the question of 'real time' feedback from our design systems. At the macro scale is the issue of sustainability, in other words long term -- and potentially disastrous -- feedback from terrestrial ecosystems. In between are numerous different units for quantizing time in design and computation. In this paper, we examine some of these units -- 'real time', 'design time', 'development time' -- to suggest how they interact with the ecology of design technology and practice. We contextualize this discussion by reference to relevant literature from the field of ecology and to our work applying custom design and analysis tools on architectural projects within a large interdisciplinary design practice.
keywords real time feedback , performance driven design , integration
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email achronis@fosterandpartners.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia12_109
id acadia12_109
authors Comodromos, Demetrios A ; Ellinger, Jefferson
year 2012
title Material Intensities
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 109-113
summary As host organizers of the Smartgeometry 2012 Conference, professors of Architecture, and as principals in design firms, our work aims to use as a productive resistance the notion of Material Intensity described below as both a foil and measure to current concepts of simulation and intensive modeling in architectural computation. The holding of SG 2012 aimed to stage this resistance in the form of workshop, round-table discussions, lectures and symposia, with the outcome attempting to define a new synthetic notion of material intensities in modes of architectural production. This paper aims to form the basis of a continued exploration and development of this work. In summary we focused on: 1-Intensive thinking as derived from the material sciences as an actual and philosophical framework that emphasizes qualitative attributes, which is likened to behavior, simulation, and dynamic modeling. Extensive attributes lead to analytical, representational and static modeling. 2-Material practices can also be formed and as a result of this method of thinking. As demonstrated by the glasswork of Evan Douglis, ‘paintings’ by Perry Hall—the managed complexity possible by working with materials during intensive states of change allow for scalar, morphological and performative shifts according to a designer’s criteria. 3- Although both are necessary and actually complement each other, architects need to ‘catch-up’ to intensive thinking in process and modeling strategies. Our methods rely on static modeling that yield often complicated frameworks and results, wherein accepting methods of dynamic modeling suggests the capacity to propose complex and nuanced relationships and frameworks.
keywords Material Intensities , Intensive Thinking , Material Practice
series ACADIA
type panel paper
email dac@methoddesign.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id ecaade2012_318
id ecaade2012_318
authors Fioravanti, Antonio ; Loffreda, Gianluigi ; Simeone, Davide ; Trento, Armando
year 2012
title “Divide et Impera” to dramatically and consciously simplify design: The mental/instance path - How reasoning among spaces, components and goals
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-2-0, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 269-278
wos WOS:000330322400027
summary In our times, in a complex and universal village where problems are intertwined and pervasive beyond our imagination, we need new approaches to deal with them – appropriately. In a previous work we highlighted the importance to reason ontologies: a ‘world’ f.i. a building – as a mental image – is not a Linnaeus’s classifi cation (structured set of entities) but a system (goals oriented set of classes) able to reasoning upon selectively chosen entities belonging to different Realms (ontology universes) (Fioravanti et al., 2011a). The general aim of our research– to be an effective aid to design – is to simulate wo/man as designer and user of designed spaces, hence how mental skill can be computably included in new tools able to tackle these problems. This paper is focused on the fi rst role: how actor-designers approach design problems and how the inference mechanism can help them and affect the design process. A ‘Building Object’ - the dual system of Spaces and Technology elements – is inferred in several ways according to different goals and the inference mechanism can, simulating human mental shortcuts, optimize thinking.
keywords Design process; design operational theory; thinking optimization; inferential mechanisms; human-machine collaboration
series eCAADe
email antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id acadia12_67
id acadia12_67
authors Gerber, Dr. David Jason ; Lin, Shih-Hsin
year 2012
title Synthesizing Design Performance: An Evolutionary Approach to Multidisciplinary Design Search
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 67-75
summary Design is a goal oriented decision-making activity. Design is ill defined and requiring of synthetic approaches to weighing and understanding tradeoffs amongst soft and hard objectives, and the imprecise and or computationally explicit criteria and goals. In this regard designers in contemporary practice face a crisis of sorts. How do we achieve performance under large degrees of uncertainty and limited design cycle time? How do we better design for integrating performance? Fundamentally design teams, are not typically given enough time nor the best tools to design explore, to generate design alternatives, and then evolve solution quality to search for best fit through expansive design solution spaces. Given the complex criteria for defining performance in architecture our research approach experiments upon an evolutionary and integrative computational strategy to expand the solution space of a design problem as well as pre-sort and qualify candidate designs. We present technology and methodology that supports rapid development of design problem solution spaces in which three design domains objectives have multi-directional impact on each other. The research describes the use of an evolutionary approach in which a genetic algorithm is used as a means to automate the design alternative population as well as to facilitate multidisciplinary design domain optimization. The paper provides a technical description of the prototype design, one that integrates associative parametric modeling with an energy use intensity evaluation and with a financial pro forma. The initial results of the research are presented and analyzed including impacts on design process; the impacts on design uncertainty and design cycle latency; and the affordances for ‘designing-in’ performance and managing project complexity. A summary discussion is developed which describes a future cloud implementation and the future extensions into other domains, scales, tectonic and system detail.
keywords Parametric Design , Domain Integration , Design Methods , Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) , Evolutionary Algorithms , Design Decision Support , Generative Design
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email dgerber@usc.edu
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia12_419
id acadia12_419
authors Hsiao, Chih-Pin ; Davis, Nicholas M. ; Do, Ellen Yi-Luen
year 2012
title Dancing on the Desktop
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 419-428
summary Dancing on the Desktop is a gesture-based modeling system. In this prototype, two interactive display screens are projected on the top of a desk and the wall behind it to show the plan and perspective views of an architectural model, respectively. A depth camera detects gestural interactions between these two displays to create an immersive gestural interaction space to manipulate the model. Additionally, visual images and text are projected on the user’s hands to provide different types of feedback about gestural interactions. We argue that Dancing on the Desktop helps users develop an embodied understanding of the spatial and volumetric properties of virtual objects. In this paper, we will review related gestural prototypes and examine their shortcomings. Then, we will introduce distributed cognition and describe how it helped our system address the shortcomings of typical gestural prototypes. Next, we will describe the implementation details and explain each type of gestural interaction in detail. Finally, we will discuss our preliminary tests and conclusions.
keywords Design Cognition , Architectural Modeling , Gestural Inputs , Immersive Environment , Augmented Reality
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email chsiao9@gatech.edu
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia12_15
id acadia12_15
authors Johnson, Jason Kelly; Cabrinha, Mark; Steinfeld, Kyle
year 2012
title Synthetic Digital Ecologies
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 15-17
summary Why use the terms synthetic and ecology in the context of a conference dedicated to the field of digital architecture, computation and fabrication? How do we begin to unpack the synthetic union of diverse elements, processes, collaborators, and code underlying any single contemporary design or research project? What could our field gain by interrogating these diverse ecologies? What are the relationships and interactions between our design processes, including our various tools and techniques, and the multiple environments with which we routinely work, collaborate and make? It is these questions and more that we hope to address at this year’s “Synthetic Digital Ecologies” conference. A quick scan of the papers and projects that will be presented at ACADIA reveals an extraordinary ecology of experimental research that emerged by working between messy labs, studios, workshops, hacker spaces and the like. In many ways today’s so-called “digital architects” do not feel compelled to distinguish between what is digitally designed and what is not. They are leading the way through a promiscuous and synthetic mixing of skill sets, of pens and paper, hardware and software, electronics and g-code. In a single research project these designers might collaborate with a computer scientist, a robotics expert and a glass blower, and in many cases they might even attempt to do all of these things themselves. It was with this in mind that we put forth an international call inviting, “… architects, fabricators, engineers, media artists, technologists, software developers, hackers and others in related fields of inquiry …” to submit papers and projects for this year’s conference. This year the proceedings have been organized into twelve synthetic categories based around the potential for diverse research topics to inform new and unexpected conversations. Instead of organizing peer-reviewed papers and projects through their formal characteristics, we were interested in forming new synthetic categories by curating unexpected juxtapositions. This ecology of ideas and research was meant to provoke and inspire new ways of thinking, making, building and collaborating.
series ACADIA
type introduction
email ksteinfe@berkeley.edu
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia12_269
id acadia12_269
authors Lally, Sean
year 2012
title Architecture of an Active Context
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 269-276
summary As we stand with our feet on earth’s outermost surface we build an architecture today that is much like it was several thousand years earlier, in an attempt to extend that outer shell with one of our own making. Artificial masses are built from a refinement of this existing geologic layer into materials of stone, steel, concrete, and glass that assemble to produce new pockets of space through the buildings they create. However, the sixth century BC writer Thales of Miletus put a different perspective on this: he insisted that we live, in reality, not on the summit of a solid earth but at the bottom of an ocean of air (Holmyard 1931). And so, as architecture continues to build up the outermost layer of earth’s surface through a mimicking, embellishing, and enhancing of the materials which it comes from, it raises the question of why we have not brought a similar relationship to the materialities at the bottom of this “ocean” of air to create the spaces we call architecture. If you were looking to level a complaint with the architectural profession, stating that it has not been ambitious enough in scope would not be one. Architects have never shied away from the opportunity to design everything from the building’s shell to the teaspoon used to stir your sugar in its matching cup. But it would seem that the profession has developed a rather large blind spot in terms of what it sees as a malleable material with which to engage. Architects have made assumptions as to what is beyond our scope of action, refraining from engaging a range of material variables due to a belief that the task would be too great or simply beyond our physical control. So even though we are enveloped by them continuously, both on the exterior as well as the interior of our buildings, it must be assumed that the particles, waves, and frequencies of energy that move around us are thought by architects to be too faint and shaky to unload upon them any heavy obligations, that they are too unwieldy for us to control to create the physical boundaries of separation, security, and movement required of architecture. This has resulted in a cultivated set of blinders that essentially defines architecture as a set of mediation devices (surfaces, walls, and inert masses) for tempering the environmental context it is situated in from the individuals and activities within. The spaces we inhabit are defined by their ability to decide what gets in and what stays out (sunlight, precipitation, winds). We place our organizational demands and aesthetic opinions on the surfaces that mediate these variables rather than seeing them as available for manipulation as a building material on their own. The intention here is to recalibrate the materialities that make up that environmental context to build architecture. The starting point is a rather naive question: can we design the energy systems that course in and around us daily as an architectural material so as to take on the needs of activities, securities, and lifestyles associated with architecture? Can the variables that we would normally mediate against instead be heightened and amplified so as to become the architecture itself? That which many would incorrectly dismiss as simply “air” today—thought to be homogeneous, scale-less, and vacant due in part to the limits of our human sensory system to perceive more fully otherwise—might tomorrow be further articulated, populated, and layered so as to become a materiality that will build spatial boundaries, define activities of individuals and movement, and act as architectural space. Our environmental context consists of a diverse range of materials (particles and waves of energy, spectrum of light, sound waves, and chemical particles) that can be manipulated and formed to meet our needs. The opportunity before us today is to embrace the needs of organizational structures and aesthetics by designing the active context that surrounds us through the material energies that define it.
keywords Material energies
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email seanlally@gmail.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia12_177
id acadia12_177
authors Mankouche, Steven ; Bard, Joshua ; Schulte, Matthew
year 2012
title Morphfaux: Probing the Proto-Synthetic Nature of Plaster Through Robotic Tooling
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 177-186
summary Morphfaux is an applied research project that revisits the virtually lost craft of plaster to explore its potential for producing thickened architectural environments through the use of contemporary digital technology. The research challenges the flatness of modern, standardized dry wall construction and explores plaster’s malleability as a material that can be applied thick and thin, finished to appear smooth or textured, and tooled while liquid or cured. If the invention of industrialized modern building products such as drywall led to the demise of the plasterer as a tradesperson, our research seeks alliances between the abilities of the human hand and those of automation. By transforming historic methods using new robotic tools, Morphfaux has broadened the possibilities of architectural plaster. While our research has produced forms not possible by human skill alone, it also clearly illustrates a symbiotic relationship between the human body and robotic machines where human dexterity and robotic precision are choreographed in the production of innovative plastering techniques.
keywords Digital Practice , Robotic Fabrication , Digital Craft , Tacit Knowledge , Material Resistance , Synthetic Material , Plaster , Variable Tools
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email jdbard@gmail.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id ecaade2012_70
id ecaade2012_70
authors Noteboom, Chris; Lindner, Gerald; Brodrück, Ralph; Suma, Alexander; Moonen, Faas
year 2012
title Towards Intuitive Communication With Our Built Environment
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 369-376
wos WOS:000330320600038
summary An exploration study is performed to investigate how a dynamic (digital) structural expressivity can lead to a new intuitive relationship between the individual user and the building.The study links the structure’s experience which can be described mathematically, and is theoretically exact, to the subjective user’s experience that is studied in the fi eld of psychology and phenomenology. The dynamic nature of their interaction is studied and an interactive virtual design is made in which the structure shows the forces the user introduces and also adapts to them; it enables intuitive communication. This approach fi ts in the global shift from primarily static to a more dynamic, one to one, agent based understanding of our environment.
keywords Communication; user-building interaction; embodied knowledge; adaptation; simulation
series eCAADe
email chris.noteboom@gmail.com
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id ecaade2008_190
id ecaade2008_190
authors Russell, Peter; Elger, Dietrich
year 2008
title The Meaning of BIM
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 531-536
summary The paper is a position paper, not a report about a research project. It concerns the paradigm-shift that is taking place in the CAAD software and its implications for the business of architecture and more importantly, for the education of future members of the profession. Twenty years ago the use of CAAD software as a replacement for hand drafting was starting. Since then the transformation is complete: hardly a final project in the universities is drawn by hand. Currently, we are witnessing a second paradigm shift and its name is BIM. The meaning of BIM is rooted in two significant differences to current CAAD software and this will have implications for teaching and practicing architecture. The first difference is the way the software structures information in the CAAD file. The standard way to save CAAD information was to organise simple geometric objects according to membership in groups and to sort them according to a layer-metaphor, which primarily controlled the visibility of the geometric elements. Three-dimensional modelling is/was nothing more than the same structure with a more complex geometry. BIM software changes this structure by storing classes of geometries and then to store the specific values of individual geometries according to factors that can be determined by external or internal logical factors. The implication for architects is that we have the chance to be the people in control of the building information model, so long as we invest the time and energy to fully understand what is happening to the building information during the planning process. If we ignore this, the real danger exists that the last control of the building’s final configuration will be usurped. As educators we are currently teaching students that will be leaving the schools in 2012 and beyond. By then, the paradigm-shift will be in full motion and so it behoves us to consider which skill sets we want the next generation of architects to possess. This means not just teaching students about how to use particular BIM software or how to program a certain parametric/genetic algorithm in a form-finding process. We need to teach our students to take the leadership in building information management and that means understanding and controlling how the building information flows, how the methodologies that are used by the consulting engineers affect our building models, and knowing what kind of logical inconsistencies (internal or external) can threaten the design intention.
keywords Building Information Modelling, Digital Curriculum, Architectural Pedagogy
series eCAADe
email russell@caad.arch.rwth-aachen.de, elger@koopx.de
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id acadia12_457
id acadia12_457
authors Shook, David ; Sarkisian, Mark
year 2012
title Weighted Metrics: Synthesizing Elements for Tall Building Design
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 457-466
summary Salient attributes of previously designed projects can be examined to understand how key parameters could inform current design practices. These parameters include gross floor area, number of stories, occupancy, material type, geographic location, seismicity, climatic influences, etc. Two informative analysis tools for intelligent design have been developed which can be used from preliminary planning stages to the final design of individual structures to district-wide developments. These tools can evaluate concurrent influences of these parameters on the built environment. The first is the Environmental Analysis Tool™ (EA Tool). The EA Tool quantifies the estimated equivalent carbon dioxide emissions of structural components. The second analysis tool is Parametric City Modeling (PCM). PCM estimates the usable area of a tower by estimating net floor area. These tools can also be applied to multiple buildings at a district scale to facilitate a new level of design in urban planning efforts. Design information embodied in the physical built environment finds new purpose in the informative prediction of performance at the on-set of digital design. Harvesting and mining data as a natural resource brings new potential to informed design. These concepts and subsequent tools are vital to building sustainable and efficient cities of the future.
keywords Data Harvesting , Sustainability , Building Efficiency , Urban Planning , Parametric Design , Optimization
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email david.shook@som.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id ecaade2012_144
id ecaade2012_144
authors Wurzer, Gabriel ; Pak, Burak
year 2012
title Lawnmower: Designing a web-based visual programming environment that generates code to help students learn textual programming
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-2-0, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 655-663.
wos WOS:000330322400069
summary Learning programming can be a challenging task for design students, especially when code is to be entered in textual form. Visual programming languages, such as McNeil’s Grasshopper, have helped students to engage in scripting without having to deal with lower level syntax that is often hindering them in expressing their thoughts. However, the problem with learning how to program textually is only postponed: When switching to a new platform, students may be forced to learn coding from scratch, and, even worse, to do so in a textual environment that is yet unfamiliar. Our idea is simple: Connect visual programming with textual coding, using code-generation as means. Using this approach enables students to think visually, and see the results textually. An added bonus is the possibility to use debugging, a feature that is yet lacking from Grasshopper. By this way, our language aims to enable students to gradually move from visual to textual programming in a comfortable manner.
keywords Visual Programming; Structured Code; Teaching; Code Generation
series eCAADe
email gabriel.wurzer@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id ecaade2012_059
id ecaade2012_059
authors Wurzer, Gabriel ; Popov, Nikolay ; Lorenz, Wolfgang E.
year 2012
title Meeting Simulation Needs of Early-Stage Design Through Agent-Based Simulation
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-2-0, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 613-620.
wos WOS:000330322400064
summary During early-stage planning, numerous design decisions are taken in an argumentative manner, based on occupation with the building site according to the different infl uencing aspects (e.g. topology, wind, visibility, circulation, activities etc.). In this context, sketches, diagrams and spreadsheets are the workhorses for elaboration. However, some of these phenomena are dynamic by nature, and are rather poorly modeled when utilizing static media. In our work, we thus show how agent-based simulation can be used to compute and visualize dynamic factors, in order to inform the decision process on a qualitative level. As a matter of fact, simulations may be used as a design tool in their own right, for analysis and objectifi ed comparison among multiple design variations.
keywords Agent-Based Simulation; Early-Stage Planning; NetLogo; Design Process.
series eCAADe
email wurzer@iemar.tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id ecaade2012_243
id ecaade2012_243
authors Araya, Sergio; Zolotovsky, Ekaterina; Gidekel, Manuel
year 2012
title Living Architecture: Micro Performances of Bio Fabrication
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 447-457
wos WOS:000330320600047
summary This ongoing research study explores novel modes of design and fabrication by combining digital tools and technologies with living biological systems within controlled environments in order to induce specifi c biological functions and material production processes. The main objective is to design and implement a biological fabrication technique, using bacteria, to produce physical components for architecture and product design.
keywords Synthetic Biology; Architecture; Design; Biofabrication; Biomaterial
series eCAADe
email sergio.araya@uai.cl
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id ecaade2012_290
id ecaade2012_290
authors Barakat, Merate
year 2012
title Urban Acoustic Simulation: Analysis of Urban Public Spaces through Auditory senses
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-2-0, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 587-592
wos WOS:000330322400060
summary This paper explores the sonic characteristics of urban spaces, with the application of apprehending acoustic space and form theory. The theory defines auditory spaces as acoustical arenas, which are spaces defi ned and delineated by sonic events. Historically, cities were built around a soundmark, for example, the resonance of a church bell or propagation of a calling for prayer, or a factory horn. Anyone living beyond the horizon of this soundmark was not considered citizens of that town. Furthermore, the volume of urban sonic arenas depends on natural. Digital simulation is necessary to visualize the ephemeral and temporal nature of sound, within a dynamic immersive environment like urban spaces. This paper digitally analyses the different morphologies of old cities and forms of growth in relation to the sound propagation and ecological effects. An experiment is conducted with the aid of an ancient North-African city model, exposed to a point cloud agent system. By analysing how the sound propagates from the known soundmark through the urban fabric, with the wind pressure interference; the paper compares the theoretical concept of soundmarks and the known perimeter of the ancient city
keywords Urban Public Spaces; Aural Design; Auditory Arena Simulation; Soundmark
series eCAADe
email merate.barakat@aaschool.ac.uk
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

For more results click below:

this is page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5... show page 26HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_613921 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002