CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id ecaade2012_237
id ecaade2012_237
authors Zarzycki, Andrzej
year 2012
title Component-based Design Approach Using BIM
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-2-0, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 67-76
wos WOS:000330322400006
summary The promising directions in current design practice and teaching relate to creativity with digital tools in the context of building information modelling (BIM), performance analysis, and simulations as well as digital materiality (computational simulations of materials) and dynamics-based behaviour. This line of research combines spatial design with building and material technology in search of effective and effi cient architecture. It reconstitutes questions of what to design by interrelating them with questions of how and why to design. This paper focuses on the appropriation of BIM tools for architectural curriculum teaching, from the design studio to building technology courses. It specifically focuses on BIM-based parametric modeling in discussing construction details, assemblies, and design explorations in the design studio context.
keywords BIM; building information modeling; parametric construction details; construction assemblies
series eCAADe
email andrzej.zarzycki@njit.edu
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id ecaade2012_000
id ecaade2012_000
authors Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejdan, Dana (eds.)
year 2012
title Digital Physicality
source Proceedings of the 30th International Conference on Education and research in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe - Volume 1 [ISBN 978-9-4912070-2-0], Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, 762 p.
summary Digital Physicality is the first volume of the conference proceedings of the 30th eCAADe conference, held from 12-14 september 2012 in Prague at the Faculty of Architecture of Czech Technical University in Prague. The companion volume is called Physical Digitality. Together, both volumes contain 154 papers that were submitted to this conference.Physicality means that digital models increasingly incorporate information and knowledge of the world. This extends beyond material and component databases of building materials, but involves time, construction knowledge, material properties, space logic, people behaviour, and so on. Digital models therefore, are as much about our understanding of the world as they are about design support. Physical is no longer the opposite part of digital models. Models and reality are partly digital and partly physical. The implication of this condition is not clear however, and it is necessary to investigate its potential. New strategies are necessary that acknowledge the synergetic qualities of the physical and the digital. This is not limited to our designs but it also influences the process, methods, and what or how we teach.The subdivision of papers in these volumes follow the distinction made in the conference theme. The papers in Digital Physicality have their orientation mainly in the digital realm, and reach towards the physical part. It has to be granted that this distinction is rather crude, because working from two extremes (digital versus physical) tends to ignore the arguably most interesting middle ground.
keywords Digital physicality; physical digitality
series eCAADe
email ecaade2012@fa.cvut.cz
last changed 2014/04/07 05:53

_id ecaade2012_002
id ecaade2012_002
authors Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejdan, Dana (eds.)
year 2012
title Physical Digitality
source Proceedings of the 30th International Conference on Education and research in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe - Volume 2 [ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7], Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, 714 p.
summary Physical Digitality is the second volume of the conference proceedings of the 30th eCAADe conference, held from 12-14 september 2012 in Prague at the Faculty of Architecture of Czech Technical University in Prague. The companion volume is called Digital Physicality. Together, both volumes contain 154 papers that were submitted to this conference. Digitality is the condition of living in a world where ubiquitous information and communication technology is embedded in the physical world. Although it is possible to point out what is “digital” and what is “real,” the distinction has become pointless, and it has no more explanatory power for our environment, buildings, and behaviour. Material objects are invested with communication possibilities, teams are communicating even when not together, and buildings can sense and respond to the environment, each other, and to inhabitants. Digital is no longer an add-on, extra, or separate software. Reality is partly digital and partly physical. The implication of this condition is not clear however, and it is necessary to investigate its potential. New strategies are necessary that acknowledge the synergetic qualities of the physical and the digital. This is not limited to our designs but it also infl uences the process, methods, and what or how we teach. The subdivision of papers in these volumes follow the distinction made in the conference theme. The papers in Physical Digitality have their orientation mainly in the physical realm, and reach towards the digital part. It has to be granted that this distinction is rather crude, because working from two extremes (digital versus physical) tends to ignore the arguably most interesting middle ground.
keywords Digital physicality; physical digitality
series eCAADe
email ecaade2012@fa.cvut.cz
last changed 2014/04/07 05:53

_id acadia12_391
id acadia12_391
authors Ajlouni, Rima
year 2012
title The Forbidden Symmetries
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 391-400
summary The emergence of quasi-periodic tiling theories in mathematics and material science is revealing a new class of symmetry, which had never been accessible before. Because of their astounding visual and structural properties, quasi-periodic symmetries can be ideally suited for many applications in art and architecture; providing a rich source of ideas for articulating form, pattern, surface and structure. However, since their discovery, the unique long-range order of quasi-periodic symmetries, is still posing a perplexing puzzle. As rule-based systems, the ability to algorithmically generate these complicated symmetries can be instrumental in understanding and manipulating their geometry. Recently, the discovery of quasi-periodic patterns in ancient Islamic architecture is providing a unique example of how ancient mathematics can inform our understanding of some basic theories in modern science. The recent investigation into these complex and chaotic formations is providing evidence to show that ancient designers, by using the most primitive tools (a compass and a straightedge) were able to resolve the complicated long-range principles of ten-fold quasi-periodic formations. Derived from these ancient principles, this paper presents a computational model for describing the long-range order of octagon-based quasi-periodic formations. The objective of the study is to design an algorithm for constructing large patches of octagon-based quasi-crystalline formations. The proposed algorithm is proven to be successful in producing an infinite and defect-free covering of the two-dimensional plane.
keywords computational model , quasi-crystalline , symmetries , algorithms , complex geometry
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email rima.ajlouni@ttu.edu
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id caadria2012_132
id caadria2012_132
authors Baerlecken, Daniel and David Duncan
year 2012
title Junk: Design build studio
source Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Chennai 25-28 April 2012, pp. 305–314
summary The paper presents a design build studio that investigates the role of waste as building material and develops a proposal for an installation that uses CAAD and CAM tools in combination with traditional fabrication tools to design and build an installation out of waste materials. The paper describes the concept development and the construction process through the help of computational tools. Recycling is in the process of becoming an integral part of sustainable architecture. However, there are very few digital design projects that use re-used or recycled materials in combination with their architectural and aesthetic qualities and potentials. The potential of such an investigation is explored within a design build studio. What is junk? What is a building material? What are the aesthetics of junk?
keywords Education in CAAD; digital fabrication and construction; practice-based and interdisciplinary CAAD; parametric modelling
series CAADRIA
email dbaerlecken3@mail.gatech.edu
last changed 2012/05/29 07:34

_id acadia12_199
id acadia12_199
authors Beorkrem, Chris ; Corte, Dan
year 2012
title Zero-Waste, Flat-Packed, Tri-Chord Truss: Continued Investigations of Structural Expression in Parametric Design"
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 199-208
summary The direct and rapid connections between scripting, modeling and prototyping allow for investigations of computation in fabrication. The manipulation of planar materials with two-dimensional CNC cuts can easily create complex and varied forms, volumes, and surfaces. However, the bulk of research on folding using CNC fabrication tools is focused upon surfaces, self-supporting walls and shell structures, which do not integrate well into more conventional building construction models. This paper attempts to explain the potential for using folding methodologies to develop structural members through a design-build process. Conventional building practice consists of the assembly of off-the-shelf parts. Many times, the plinth, skeleton, and skin are independently designed and fabricated, integrating multiple industries. Using this method of construction as an operative status quo, this investigation focused on a single structural component: the truss. Using folding methodologies and sheet steel to create a truss, this design investigation employed a recyclable and prolific building material to redefine the fabrication of a conventional structural member. The potential for using digital design and two-dimensional CNC fabrication tools in the design of a foldable truss from sheet steel is viable in the creation of a flat-packed, minimal waste structural member that can adapt to a variety of aesthetic and structural conditions. Applying new methods to a component of the conventional ‘kit of parts’ allowed for a novel investigation that recombines zero waste goals, flat-packing potential, structural expression and computational processes. This paper will expand (greatly) upon previous research into bi-chord truss designs, developing a tri-chord truss, which is parametrically linked to its structural moment diagram. The cross section of each truss is formed based on the loading condition for each beam. This truss design has been developed through a thorough series of analytical models and tests performed digitally, to scale and in full scale. The tri-chord truss is capable of resisting rotational failures well beyond the capacity of the bi-chord designs previously developed. The results are complex, and elegant expressions of structural logics embodied in a tightly constrained functional design.
keywords Parametric Design , Structural Expression , Material constraints
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email cbeorkrem@uncc.edu
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id caadria2012_078
id caadria2012_078
authors Beorkrem, Christopher
year 2012
title Running Interference: Complex Systems Intervention as Design Process
source Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Chennai 25-28 April 2012, pp. 183–192
summary This paper presents a case study problem statement tested in the design studio with the intent of teaching methods for engaging systematic thinking as a process for deriving solutions to parametric design problems. The intent is to address the simulation environment developed through complex systems and interject a curve ball, or unexpected constraint delimiting the solution as part of the design process. This method was tested through the submittal of the projects to international design competitions. The students were asked to manipulate the competition criteria by appealing not only to the design criteria but also to the juries desire (whether conscious or unconscious) for novel sustainable processes of material usage and program. This material ecology is developed as a method for linking parametric modelling, not as a process for the application of a construction technique, but as a way to pre-rationalise material constraints and discover how program and form can operate within those constraints. In the first year of the studio two of six teams were selected as finalists and in the second year of the studio five of seven of the teams were selected as finalists.
keywords Studio pedagogy; computational instruction; parametrics; material constraints
series CAADRIA
email cbeorkrem@uncc.edu
last changed 2012/05/29 07:34

_id sigradi2012_221
id sigradi2012_221
authors de Menezes, Alexandre Monteiro; Pontes, Mateus Moreira
year 2012
title BIM e o ensino: possibilidades na instrumentação e no projeto [BIM and education: possibilities in instrumentation and project]
source SIGraDi 2012 [Proceedings of the 16th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Brasil - Fortaleza 13-16 November 2012, pp. 226-228
summary This article discusses the relationship between instrumentation for the architectural design, in particular the teaching of drawing, and current conditions of representation, based on digital tools, specially with the use of softwares for Building Information Modeling (BIM). It presents the difficulties of teaching architectural design today and proposes an alternative comprehension of priorities, based on understanding of architectural elements as a reference for learning. After this, it discusses the potential of this technique for teaching construction of a more comprehensive way and presents a multimedia material for developing this task.
keywords BIM, ensino, representação arquitetônica
series SIGRADI
email mateus.pontes@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id acadia12_295
id acadia12_295
authors Dierichs, Karola ; Menges, Achim
year 2012
title Functionally Graded Aggregate Structures: Digital Additive Manufacturing With Designed Granulates
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 295-304
summary In recent years, loose granulates have come to be investigated as architectural systems in their own right. They are defined as large numbers of elements in loose contact, which continuously reconfigure into variant stable states. In nature they are observed in systems like sand or snow. In architecture, however, they were previously known only from rare vernacular examples and geoengineering projects, and are only now being researched for their innate material potentials. Their relevance for architecture lies in being entirely reconfigurable and in allowing for structures that are functionally graded on a macro level. Hence they are a very relevant yet unexplored field within architectural design. The research presented here is focused on the potential of working with designed granulates, which are aggregates where the individual particles are designed to accomplish a specific architectural effect. Combining these with the use of a computer-controlled emitter-head, the process of pouring these aggregate structures can function as an alternative form of 3D printing or digital additive manufacturing, which allows both for instant solidification, consequent reconfiguration, and graded material properties. In its first part, the paper introduces the field of research into aggregate architectures. In its second part, the focus is laid on designed aggregates, and an analytical design tool for the individual grains is discussed. The third part presents research conducted into the process of additive manufacturing with designed granulates. To conclude, further areas of investigation are outlined especially with regard to the development of the additive manufacturing of functionally graded architectural structures. The potentials of the methodologies developed in this process are shown through the fabrication of a full-scale installation. By integrating material, fabrication, and design constraints into a streamlined computational methodology, the process also serves as a model for a more intuitive production workflow, expanding the understanding of glass as a material with wide-ranging possibilities for a more performative architecture.
keywords Aggregate Architectures , Digital Additive Manufacturing , Functionally Graded Materials
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email karola.dierichs@icd.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia12_217
id acadia12_217
authors Dourtme, Stella ; Ernst, Claudia ; Garcia, Manuel Jimenez ; Garcia, Roberto
year 2012
title Digital Plaster: A Prototypical Design System
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 217-230
summary Contemporary computational design processes offer more potential in the design of complex formal architectural outcomes when material processes and fabrication techniques are incorporated within a digital working methodology. This paper discusses the research project “Digital Plaster” which show-cases the development of such an architectural machine that enabled a digital design process to incorporate fabrication and structural form finding processes within flexible formwork plaster casting by the means of digitally depicting a material ecology.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email stelladourtme@gmail.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia12_139
id acadia12_139
authors Erioli, Alessio ; Zomparelli, Alessandro
year 2012
title Emergent Reefs
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 139-148
summary The Emergent Reefs project thrives on the potential that emerge from a coherent utilization of the environment’s inherent ecological structure for its own transformation and evolution, using an approach based on digitally simulated ecosystems and sparkled by the possibilities and potential of large-scale 3D printing technology. Considering tourism as an inevitable vector of environmental change, the project aims to direct its potential and economic resources towards a positive transformation, providing a material substrate for the human-marine ecosystem integration with the realization of spaces for an underwater sculpture exhibition. Such structures will also provide a pattern of cavities which, expanding the gradient of microenvironmental conditions, break the existing homogeneity in favor of systemic heterogeneity, providing the spatial and material preconditions for the repopulation of marine biodiversity. Starting from a digital simulation of a synthetic local ecosystem, a generative technique based on multi-agent systems and continuous cellular automata (put into practice from the theoretical premises in Alan Turing’s paper “The Chemical basis of Morphogenesis” through reaction-diffusion simulation) is implemented in a voxel field at several scales giving the project a twofold quality: the implementation of reaction diffusion generative strategy within a non-isotropic 3-dimensional field and integration with the large-scale 3D printing fabrication system patented by D-Shape®. Out of these assumptions and in the intent of exploiting the expressive and tectonic potential of such technology, the project has been tackled exploring voxel-based generative strategies. Working with a discrete lattice eases the simulation of complex systems and processes across multiple scales (including non-linear simulations such as Computational Fluid-Dynamics) starting from local interactions using, for instance, algorithms based on cellular automata, which then can be translated directly to the physical production system. The purpose of Emergent-Reefs is to establish, through strategies based on computational design tools and machine-based fabrication, seamless relationships between three different aspects of the architectural process: generation, simulation and construction, which in the case of the used technology can be specified as guided growth.
keywords emergence , reef , underwater , 3D printing , ecology , ecosystem , CFD , agency , architecture , tourism , culture , Open Source
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email alessio.erioli@unibo.it
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id ecaade2012_315
id ecaade2012_315
authors Fleischmann, Moritz ; Menges, Achim
year 2012
title Physics-Based Modeling as an alternative approach to geometrical constrain-modeling for the design of elastically-deformable material systems
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-2-0, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 565-575
wos WOS:000330322400058
summary Physics-Based Modelling can be considered as an alternative approach to geometrical constrain-based modelling for form-active material systems such as gridshells. Here we explain a vector-based method that works in R2 and R3 to determine momentum forces at the node level, which can easily be implemented into (existing) particle systems and - together with the simulation of tension and compression forces - can be used to model the behavior of such material systems.
keywords Computational Design; Physics-Based Modelling; Springs; Bending; Material Behaviour
series eCAADe
email moritz.fleischmann@icd.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id caadria2012_042
id caadria2012_042
authors Globa, Anastasia and Michael Donn
year 2012
title Digital to physical: Comparative evaluation of three main CNC fabrication technologies adopted for physical modelling in architecture
source Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Chennai 25-28 April 2012, pp. 327–336
summary Recently, digital fabrication, being a logical extension of computer-aided technology to the material world, was introduced into the field of computational design in architecture. The objective of this experimental study is to investigate and systematise data regarding the production issues and limitations of the main Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) fabrication technologies adopted for physical modelling in architecture. This study also aims to observe the value of potential feedback to the design process from different types of digitally fabricated architectural models. This experimental research systematically explores digital fabrication as a computer-aided modelling tool, using two international architectural competition projects as case studies: the design of a skyscraper and relocatable schools. Developed by authors especially for this research paper, each case study acts as a test bed to compare and evaluate digital production techniques adopted for physical modelling in architecture. Designs go through a process of refinement using CNC fabrication as an integral part of the design process. Each step in the process is closely evaluated as to its effectiveness according to a matrix of feedback criteria.
keywords Design process; digital fabrication; architectural model
series CAADRIA
email Globalnaya@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/29 07:34

_id acadia13_137
id acadia13_137
authors Kretzer, Manuel; In, Jessica; Letkemann, Joel; Jaskiewicz, Tomasz
year 2013
title Resinance: A (Smart) Material Ecology
source ACADIA 13: Adaptive Architecture [Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-926724-22-5] Cambridge 24-26 October, 2013), pp. 137-146
summary What if we had materials that weren’t solid and static like traditional building materials are? What if these materials could dynamically change and adapt to varying environmental situations and stimulations and evolve and learn over time? What if they were autonomous, self-sufficient and independent but could communicate with each other and exchange information? What would this “living matter” mean for architecture and the way we perceive the built environment? This paper looks briefly at current concepts and investigations in regards to programmable matter that occupy various areas of architectural research. It then goes into detail in describing the most recent smart material installation “Resinance” that was supervised by Manuel Kretzer and Benjamin Dillenburger and realized by the 2012/13 Master of Advanced Studies class as part of the materiability research at the Chair for CAAD, ETH Zürich in March 2013. The highly speculative sculpture links approaches in generative design, digital fabrication, physical/ubiquitous computing, distributed networks, swarm behavior and agent-based communication with bioinspiration and organic simulation in a responsive entity that reacts to user input and adapts its behavior over time.
keywords Smart Materials; Distributed Networks; Digital Fabrication; Physical Computing; Responsive Environment
series ACADIA
type Normal Paper
email kretzer@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2014/01/11 08:13

_id ecaade2012_152
id ecaade2012_152
authors Krieg, Oliver David; Mihaylov, Boyan; Schwinn, Tobias; Reichert, Steffen; Menges, Achim
year 2012
title Computational Design of Robotically Manufactured Plate Structures Based on Biomimetic Design Principles Derived from Clypeasteroida
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 531-540
wos WOS:000330320600056
summary The paper presents the current development of an ongoing research project about the integration of robotic fabrication strategies in computational design through morphological and functional principles derived from natural systems. Initially, a developed plate structure material system based on robotically fabricated fi nger joints is being informed by biomimetic principles from the sea urchin Clypeasteroida in order to be able to adapt effi ciently to its building environment. Consequently, the paper’s main focus lies on translating the biomimetic design principles into a computational design tool, also integrating fabrication parameters as well as structural and architectural demands. The design tool’s capability to integrate these parameters is shown by the design, development and realization of a full-scale research pavilion. The paper concludes with discussing the performative capacity of the developed material system and the introduced methodology.
keywords Biomimetics; Digital Simulation; Parametric Design; Robotic Manufacturing
series eCAADe
email oliver@davidkrieg.com
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id acadia12_97
id acadia12_97
authors Lilley, Brian ; Hudson, Roland ; Plucknett, Kevin ; Macdonald, Rory ; Cheng, Nancy Yen-Wen ; Nielsen, Stig Anton ; Nouska, Olympia ; Grinbergs, Monika ; Andematten, Stephen ; Baumgardner, Kyle ; Blackman, Clayton ; Kennedy, Matthew ; Chatinthu, Monthira ; Tianchen, Dai ; Sheng-Fu, Chen
year 2012
title Ceramic Perspiration: Multi-Scalar Development of Ceramic Material
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 97-108
summary Ceramic building material is a useful passive modulator of the environment. The subject area is based on traditional cultural and material knowledge of clay properties: from amphora to rammed earth building; and ranges to present uses: from desiccants and space shuttle tile patterns to bio-ceramics. The primary consideration is to control material density and porosity in a tile component, in response to specific environmental conditions. This depends on a number of key physical principles: the ability of the material to absorb thermal energy, the ability to absorb and then ‘wick’ moisture within the pore structure, and the decrement factor or ‘time lag’ of the effect. The interplay between these properties point to the importance of directionality in the porous microstructure, at the boundary layer. Material characteristics have been investigated in the laboratory at a micron scale and in the ceramics workshop at full scale, with some interplay between the two. Recent work done on monitoring has led to the development of software tools that allow feedback (approaching real time)- a visual representation of the dynamic thermal and hygrometric properties involved.
keywords Synthetic tectonics , composite materials , smart assemblies , emerging material processes , Responsive environments , sensing , real-time computation , feedback loops , Information Visualization
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email brian.lilley@dal.ca
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id caadria2012_058
id caadria2012_058
authors Matthews, Linda and Gavin Perin
year 2012
title Materialising the pixel: A productive synergy
source Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Chennai 25-28 April 2012, pp. 475–484
summary The composite photoreceptive field of the human eye receives photons emitted from a source and converts this energy into image information within the brain. The internal mechanisms of the contemporary camera imaging technologies represent yet another in a long history of attempts to technically replicate this procedure. The critical difference between the capacity of the human eye to receive quanta events or photons and that of a camera transmitting to a digital display device, rests in how much of the original signal can be recovered. This paper aims to show how the ‘information deficit’ associated with this technological conversion can be enhanced by the deliberate exploitation and re-arrangement of the camera’s image sensor mechanism. The paper will discuss how the mapping of pixel grid geometries and colour filter array patterns at the vastly increased scale of building façades, imparts a materiality to urban form that modifies the visibility and performance of the corresponding virtual screen image. The exploration of the material adaptation of pixel geometries leads to a new technique that extends the working gamut of pixel-based RGB colour space and both establishes an index to develop material performance criteria and modifies the limitations of traditional viewing technologies.
keywords Pixels; sensor; CCTV; imaging; array; façades
series CAADRIA
email Linda.Matthews@uts.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/29 07:34

_id acadia12_287
id acadia12_287
authors McGee, Wes ; Newell, Catie ; Willette, Aaron
year 2012
title Glass Cast: A Reconfigurable Tooling System for Free-Form Glass Manufacturing
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 287-294
summary Despite glass’s ubiquity in the modern built environment it is rarely applied in applications requiring complex curvature. The high temperatures and complexity of techniques utilized in forming curved glass panels are typically very expensive to employ, requiring dedicated hard-tooling which ultimately limits the formal variation that can be achieved. This combination of economic and manufacturing barriers limits both the formal possibilities and potentially the overall envelope-performance characteristics of the glazing system. This research investigates a methodology for utilizing reconfigurable tooling to form glass into doubly curved geometries, offering the potential for improved structural and environmental performance in a material that has remained largely unchanged since the advent of its industrial manufacturing. A custom built forming kiln has been developed and tested, integrated through a parametric modeling workflow to provide manufacturing constraint feedback directly into the design process. The research also investigates the post-form trimming of glass utilizing robotic abrasive waterjet cutting, allowing for the output of machine control data directly from the digital model. The potentials of the methodologies developed in this process are shown through the fabrication of a full-scale installation. By integrating material, fabrication, and design constraints into a streamlined computational methodology, the process also serves as a model for a more intuitive production workflow, expanding the understanding of glass as a material with wide-ranging possibilities for a more performative architecture.
keywords Digital Fabrication , Robotic Fabrication , Computational Design , Material Computation
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email wesmcgee@umich.edu
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia12_187
id acadia12_187
authors Mei-Ling, Lin ; Han, Ling ; Kothapuram, Shankara ; Jiawei, Song
year 2012
title Digital Vernacular
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 187-195
summary Digital Vernacular investigates the potential of the process of depositing a paste like material with precision using a CNC device which has produced an innovative system for design and fabrication of environmentally responsive housing. Architectural practice has been greatly impacted by technical innovations in the past, usually new building types emerge as part of new ideologies. Yet the current revolution in computer-aided design and fabrication has architecture focusing on form – without questioning what these new processes can bring for the masses. The research project 'Digital Vernacular' has investigated the potential of using CNC technology for the production of housing. It has focused on the design of the machinic devices as well as computational design tools, and revolves around the concept of fabrication on site. Using an additive and layered manufacturing process and locally available material, the project proposes a revolutionary new digital design and fabrication system that is based on one of the oldest and most sustainable construction methods in the world. The main potentials of this method are not to create complex forms for the sake of design, but to use parametric control to adapt each design to the specificities of its site. Using geometrical rules found during many research experiments with real material behaviour, a new architectural language is created that merges several environmental functionalities into a single integrated design.
keywords Digital , Vernacular , CNC , CAM , Housing , fabrication , environmental
series ACADIA
type panel paper
email racosin@gmail.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia15_211
id acadia15_211
authors Melsom, James; Girot, Christophe; Hurkxkens, Ilmar
year 2015
title Directed Deposition: Exploring the Roles of Simulation and Design in Erosion and Landslide Processes
source ACADIA 2105: Computational Ecologies: Design in the Anthropocene [Proceedings of the 35th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-53726-8] Cincinnati 19-25 October, 2015), pp. 211-221
summary Working with and against environmental processes, such as the movement of water, earth, and rock, and terrain, has been a perpetual challenge since the dawn of civilisation. While it has been possible to gradually tame many landscapes to perform in a predictable manner, there are many circumstances where we are forced to live with and around such processes in everyday life. This research is primarily interested in the potential of design to interact with such processes. Specifically, we are interested in the designed redirection of erosion and landslide processes already observable in nature, taking the urbanised hillsides of the Alps as test case scenario. The research specialisation continues a research and design focus specialised on processes material deposition of river and flood systems, further down the water catchment chain (REF: ANON 2012). This specific alpine research is compelling in the context of Anthropocene processes, we are specifically focussed in the appraisal, harnessing and redirection of existing environmental phenomena, given what can be understood as our inevitable interaction with these processes (Sijmons 2015). Within this broader research, which has ecological, cultural, and formal potential, this paper shall explore the practical aspects of connecting design, and the designer, with the potential for understanding and designing these evolving mountain landscapes. There is a long history behind the development of landscape elements which control avalanches, mud, rock, and landslides. The cultural, functional and aesthetic role of such elements in the landscape is relatively undiscussed, epitomising an approach that is primarily pragmatic in both engineering and expense. It is perhaps no surprise that these elements have a dominant physical and visual presence in the contemporary landscape. Through the investigation of synergies with other systems, interests, and design potential for such landscape elements, it is proposed that new potential can be found in their implementation. This research proposes that the intuitive linking of common design software to direct landslide simulation, design of and cultural use can interact with these natural processes. This paper shall demonstrate methods to within which design can enter the process of landscape management, linking the modelling processes of the landscape designer with the simulation capabilities of the specialised engineer.
keywords Landscape Design Workflows, Landscape Simulation, Terrain Displacement, Material Flow, Erosion Processes, Interdisciplinary Workflows
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email melsom@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2016/08/05 11:37

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