CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 532

_id 47a2
id 47a2
authors Bhzad Sidawi and Neveen Hamza
year 2012
title Editorial: Special issue on CAAD and innovation
source ITCON journal
summary The concepts and applications of Computer Aided Architectural Design (CAAD) have a predominant presence and impact on architectural design innovation and creativity. ASCAAD, in its 6th international conference, invited the learnt society of academics, researchers and professionals to debate the ubiquitous emerging role of CAAD in underpinning innovative design thinking processes and research in design education. The conference theme covered the following issues:  Computational research in design pedagogy and in practice  Intelligent agents, generative and parametric design  Building Information Modeling and Computer-supported design collaboration  Ubiquitous computing and interactive environments  Urban/ City/ regional planning and digital Modeling  Digital tools in design and construction  Mass customization Selected papers have been updated in this publication to reflect the constant quest to balance architectural thinking with operative techniques. It is well acknowledged that the advent of computation and information technology had profoundly altered architectural thinking. Design software and numerical fabrication have recast the role of form giving and shaping environments in architecture and opened up unprecedented opportunities of investigation and links with other scientific domains such as biomimcry, parametric design and modeling of urban and building environments. In this issue authors suggest a continuum between architectural analytical thinking and CAAD systems. Looking at the collaboration between authors of various backgrounds also strengthens this narrative that architecture is expanding beyond its traditional enquiry into historical and theoretical aspects into the world of multi-desciplinarity. It is evident from the diverse publications that CAAD is designed and utilized to expand the architectural pedagogy and practice into initiating and opening up the exploratory grounds of creation and productivity in design.
series journal paper
type short paper
email Bsidawi@ud.edu.sa
more http://www.itcon.org/cgi-bin/works/Show?2012_14
last changed 2012/09/19 11:43

_id acadia12_287
id acadia12_287
authors McGee, Wes ; Newell, Catie ; Willette, Aaron
year 2012
title Glass Cast: A Reconfigurable Tooling System for Free-Form Glass Manufacturing
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 287-294
summary Despite glass’s ubiquity in the modern built environment it is rarely applied in applications requiring complex curvature. The high temperatures and complexity of techniques utilized in forming curved glass panels are typically very expensive to employ, requiring dedicated hard-tooling which ultimately limits the formal variation that can be achieved. This combination of economic and manufacturing barriers limits both the formal possibilities and potentially the overall envelope-performance characteristics of the glazing system. This research investigates a methodology for utilizing reconfigurable tooling to form glass into doubly curved geometries, offering the potential for improved structural and environmental performance in a material that has remained largely unchanged since the advent of its industrial manufacturing. A custom built forming kiln has been developed and tested, integrated through a parametric modeling workflow to provide manufacturing constraint feedback directly into the design process. The research also investigates the post-form trimming of glass utilizing robotic abrasive waterjet cutting, allowing for the output of machine control data directly from the digital model. The potentials of the methodologies developed in this process are shown through the fabrication of a full-scale installation. By integrating material, fabrication, and design constraints into a streamlined computational methodology, the process also serves as a model for a more intuitive production workflow, expanding the understanding of glass as a material with wide-ranging possibilities for a more performative architecture.
keywords Digital Fabrication , Robotic Fabrication , Computational Design , Material Computation
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email wesmcgee@umich.edu
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia12_199
id acadia12_199
authors Beorkrem, Chris ; Corte, Dan
year 2012
title Zero-Waste, Flat-Packed, Tri-Chord Truss: Continued Investigations of Structural Expression in Parametric Design"
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 199-208
summary The direct and rapid connections between scripting, modeling and prototyping allow for investigations of computation in fabrication. The manipulation of planar materials with two-dimensional CNC cuts can easily create complex and varied forms, volumes, and surfaces. However, the bulk of research on folding using CNC fabrication tools is focused upon surfaces, self-supporting walls and shell structures, which do not integrate well into more conventional building construction models. This paper attempts to explain the potential for using folding methodologies to develop structural members through a design-build process. Conventional building practice consists of the assembly of off-the-shelf parts. Many times, the plinth, skeleton, and skin are independently designed and fabricated, integrating multiple industries. Using this method of construction as an operative status quo, this investigation focused on a single structural component: the truss. Using folding methodologies and sheet steel to create a truss, this design investigation employed a recyclable and prolific building material to redefine the fabrication of a conventional structural member. The potential for using digital design and two-dimensional CNC fabrication tools in the design of a foldable truss from sheet steel is viable in the creation of a flat-packed, minimal waste structural member that can adapt to a variety of aesthetic and structural conditions. Applying new methods to a component of the conventional ‘kit of parts’ allowed for a novel investigation that recombines zero waste goals, flat-packing potential, structural expression and computational processes. This paper will expand (greatly) upon previous research into bi-chord truss designs, developing a tri-chord truss, which is parametrically linked to its structural moment diagram. The cross section of each truss is formed based on the loading condition for each beam. This truss design has been developed through a thorough series of analytical models and tests performed digitally, to scale and in full scale. The tri-chord truss is capable of resisting rotational failures well beyond the capacity of the bi-chord designs previously developed. The results are complex, and elegant expressions of structural logics embodied in a tightly constrained functional design.
keywords Parametric Design , Structural Expression , Material constraints
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email cbeorkrem@uncc.edu
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia12_139
id acadia12_139
authors Erioli, Alessio ; Zomparelli, Alessandro
year 2012
title Emergent Reefs
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 139-148
summary The Emergent Reefs project thrives on the potential that emerge from a coherent utilization of the environment’s inherent ecological structure for its own transformation and evolution, using an approach based on digitally simulated ecosystems and sparkled by the possibilities and potential of large-scale 3D printing technology. Considering tourism as an inevitable vector of environmental change, the project aims to direct its potential and economic resources towards a positive transformation, providing a material substrate for the human-marine ecosystem integration with the realization of spaces for an underwater sculpture exhibition. Such structures will also provide a pattern of cavities which, expanding the gradient of microenvironmental conditions, break the existing homogeneity in favor of systemic heterogeneity, providing the spatial and material preconditions for the repopulation of marine biodiversity. Starting from a digital simulation of a synthetic local ecosystem, a generative technique based on multi-agent systems and continuous cellular automata (put into practice from the theoretical premises in Alan Turing’s paper “The Chemical basis of Morphogenesis” through reaction-diffusion simulation) is implemented in a voxel field at several scales giving the project a twofold quality: the implementation of reaction diffusion generative strategy within a non-isotropic 3-dimensional field and integration with the large-scale 3D printing fabrication system patented by D-Shape®. Out of these assumptions and in the intent of exploiting the expressive and tectonic potential of such technology, the project has been tackled exploring voxel-based generative strategies. Working with a discrete lattice eases the simulation of complex systems and processes across multiple scales (including non-linear simulations such as Computational Fluid-Dynamics) starting from local interactions using, for instance, algorithms based on cellular automata, which then can be translated directly to the physical production system. The purpose of Emergent-Reefs is to establish, through strategies based on computational design tools and machine-based fabrication, seamless relationships between three different aspects of the architectural process: generation, simulation and construction, which in the case of the used technology can be specified as guided growth.
keywords emergence , reef , underwater , 3D printing , ecology , ecosystem , CFD , agency , architecture , tourism , culture , Open Source
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email alessio.erioli@unibo.it
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia12_315
id acadia12_315
authors Imbern, Matias ; Raspall, Felix ; Su, Qi
year 2012
title Tectonic Tessellations: A Digital Approach to Ceramic Structural Surfaces
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 315-321
summary From the beginning of digital revolution, structural surfaces drew significant attention as a realm that interweaves formal explorations, form-finding and structural optimization. However, after successful experimentation in the virtual domain, it became evident that some of the main challenges lay on how to translate these structural forms into architectural assemblies at the scale of buildings. The development of digital fabrication is crucial in this task, as means to overcome traditional constraints such as need for modular pieces, scaffolding and optimal assembly sequences.This research focuses on digital workflows that combine form finding with robotic fabrication, surface tessellation and panelization. In the past years, the use of digital tools to assemble identical modules into complex formations has achieved significant results for loadbearing walls. Expanding this line of research, the proposed fabrication system carries these experiments on additive fabrication into the production of structural surfaces. The assembly sequence involves a two-step fabrication: off-site panel manufacturing and on-site assembly. The main components of the system consist of two triangular ceramic pieces that provide structural resistance, refined surface finish, and formwork for thin reinforced-concrete layer. Panelization strategies reduce the requirements on-site work and formwork.The paper describes background research, concept, construction process, methodology, results and conclusions.
keywords Digital Fabrication , Complex Geometry , Reinforced Ceramic , Structural Surfaces , Reduced Formwork
series ACADIA
type panel paper
email mbimbern@hotmail.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id ecaade2012_152
id ecaade2012_152
authors Krieg, Oliver David; Mihaylov, Boyan; Schwinn, Tobias; Reichert, Steffen; Menges, Achim
year 2012
title Computational Design of Robotically Manufactured Plate Structures Based on Biomimetic Design Principles Derived from Clypeasteroida
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 531-540
wos WOS:000330320600056
summary The paper presents the current development of an ongoing research project about the integration of robotic fabrication strategies in computational design through morphological and functional principles derived from natural systems. Initially, a developed plate structure material system based on robotically fabricated fi nger joints is being informed by biomimetic principles from the sea urchin Clypeasteroida in order to be able to adapt effi ciently to its building environment. Consequently, the paper’s main focus lies on translating the biomimetic design principles into a computational design tool, also integrating fabrication parameters as well as structural and architectural demands. The design tool’s capability to integrate these parameters is shown by the design, development and realization of a full-scale research pavilion. The paper concludes with discussing the performative capacity of the developed material system and the introduced methodology.
keywords Biomimetics; Digital Simulation; Parametric Design; Robotic Manufacturing
series eCAADe
email oliver@davidkrieg.com
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id ecaade2012_95
id ecaade2012_95
authors Ladurner, Georg; Gabler, Markus; Menges, Achim; Knippers, Jan
year 2012
title Interactive Form-Finding for Biomimetic Fibre Structures: Development of a Computational Design Tool and Physical Fabrication Technique Based on the Biological Structure of the Lichen
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 519-529
wos WOS:000330320600055
summary This contribution shows a biomimetic approach to design and produce fibrous structural elements derived from the morphology of the biologic archetype ‘the lichen’. The physical form fi nding strategy allows for a novel self-organised reinforcement for fibrous composite systems. A computational design tool has been developed, based on the fi ndings of various physical models. The digital device allows for shape control and therefore an interaction to and manipulation of the fabrication process. Since the form fi nding algorithms of the tool are based on physical experiments,every geometry is derived through the program and has its counterpart in production. For example: the fibre density in the model can be adjusted which leads to different geometries. In production the chosen denseness is utilised, thus, the production yields automatically to the desired load-optimized geometry found in the form-finding tool.
keywords Biomimetics; Form-finding; Self-organization; Emergence; Fibre structures
series eCAADe
email georg.ladurner@gmail.com
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id ecaade2013_128
id ecaade2013_128
authors Symeonidou, Ioanna; Hirschberg, Urs and Kaftan, Martin
year 2013
title Designing the Negative
source Stouffs, Rudi and Sariyildiz, Sevil (eds.), Computation and Performance – Proceedings of the 31st eCAADe Conference – Volume 1, Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, 18-20 September 2013, pp. 683-691
wos WOS:000340635300071
summary Designing the Negative was the title of a Master Studio that took place at the Institute of Architecture and Media of Graz University of Technology during the summer semester of 2012. Students designed and fabricated prototypes of customized concrete formwork as part of their studio assignment. The studio theme forced students to think about digital fabrication with parametric tools in a hands-on fashion. Using robotic technology and hot-wire cutting, students worked with the robot’s constraints (size of the robot’s arm, robot’s axis and tool’s restrictions) to design complex curved elements that could serve as formwork (the negative) for cast concrete elements (the positive). The students were asked to design a production strategy for their cast concrete elements as well as the application of said elements in an architectural scheme. The student projects confirmed the value of a pedagogy that takes on research-relevant questions in an interdisciplinary studio setting and engages students in a process that is best described as digital crafting: it simultaneously addressed the conceptual and technical as well as the material and tactile aspects of digital fabrication and design.
keywords Digital fabrication; customization; concrete; hot-wire cutting; parametric design.
series eCAADe
email symeonidou@tugraz.at
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id acadia12_157
id acadia12_157
authors Schwinn, Tobias ; Krieg, Oliver David ; Menges, Achim ; Mihaylov, Boyan ; Reichert, Steffen
year 2012
title Machinic Morphospaces: Biomimetic Design Strategies for the Computational Exploration of Robot Constraint Spaces for Wood Fabrication
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 157-168
summary The paper presents research into computational design processes that integrate not only criteria of physical producibility but also characteristics of design intelligence and performance. In the first part, the use of an industrial robot’s design space for developing differentiated finger joint connections for planar sheets of plywood is being introduced. Subsequently, biomimetics is proposed as a filter for the possible geometric differentiations with respect performative capacities. The second part focuses on the integration of fabricational and biomimetic principles with structural and architectural demands, as well as by the development of a custom digital data structure for the fabrication of finger joint plate structures resulting in the construction of a full scale prototype. The paper concludes with evaluating the tolerances inherent in construction through 3D laser scan validation of the physical model.
keywords Computational Design , Robotic Manufacturing , Digital Fabrication , Biomimetics , 3D Scanning
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email tobias.schwinn@gmail.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id ecaade2012_284
id ecaade2012_284
authors Ameijde, Jeroen van; Carlin, Brendon
year 2012
title Digital Construction: Automated Design and Construction Experiments Using Customised On-Site Digital Devices
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 439-446
wos WOS:000330320600046
summary This paper presents a currently on-going research trajectory, investigating integrated design and build work-fl ows using generative design strategies and custom built fabrication devices. The aim of the research, which is being developed through a series of experiments and workshops, is to explore scenarios in which these work-flows can produce emergent architectural structures which are highly adapted towards the intended performance within their specifi c context and site. The research has produced a number of installations and prototypical structures which test the practical and theoretical dimensions of the methodology explored. This paper will introduce intriguing new scenarios in which the architects’ role is focused on an indirect, advanced level of control of the process of design, allowing for a more open-ended method of negotiation between structure, users and environment.
keywords Generative design; digital fabrication; customised CNC devices; digital on-site construction
series eCAADe
email Jeroen@s-t-x.net
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id acadia12_149
id acadia12_149
authors Besler, Erin
year 2012
title Low Fidelity
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 149-153
summary Low Fidelity engages in the translational discrepancies that occur through mediums of architectural representation, not as instances of dilemma but as opportunities to subdue tautology and augment the seductive latency of representation(1). Where some might contend the discrepant as unlawful, the methodology that this thesis argues for engages the digital and machinic, and explores the translational discrepancies that challenge and interrupt our interface with matters of materialization and excite material propensities. The discrepant becomes a dynamic catalyst through the engagement of tools and techniques that subvert the homogeneity of digital design. Low Fidelity engages the sphere of translation by reevaluating the role of architectural representation as generator and generated its originations and its limitations. In an attempt to negotiate the digital and physical, this thesis situates itself within the feedback loop between the mediums of translation through ideas their formal logics, material propensities and back again.
keywords Robotic Fabrication , Digital Machinic , Material Propensity , Technological Fidelity , Generative Representation , Translation through Mediums
series ACADIA
type panel paper
email erinbesler@gmail.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia12_295
id acadia12_295
authors Dierichs, Karola ; Menges, Achim
year 2012
title Functionally Graded Aggregate Structures: Digital Additive Manufacturing With Designed Granulates
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 295-304
summary In recent years, loose granulates have come to be investigated as architectural systems in their own right. They are defined as large numbers of elements in loose contact, which continuously reconfigure into variant stable states. In nature they are observed in systems like sand or snow. In architecture, however, they were previously known only from rare vernacular examples and geoengineering projects, and are only now being researched for their innate material potentials. Their relevance for architecture lies in being entirely reconfigurable and in allowing for structures that are functionally graded on a macro level. Hence they are a very relevant yet unexplored field within architectural design. The research presented here is focused on the potential of working with designed granulates, which are aggregates where the individual particles are designed to accomplish a specific architectural effect. Combining these with the use of a computer-controlled emitter-head, the process of pouring these aggregate structures can function as an alternative form of 3D printing or digital additive manufacturing, which allows both for instant solidification, consequent reconfiguration, and graded material properties. In its first part, the paper introduces the field of research into aggregate architectures. In its second part, the focus is laid on designed aggregates, and an analytical design tool for the individual grains is discussed. The third part presents research conducted into the process of additive manufacturing with designed granulates. To conclude, further areas of investigation are outlined especially with regard to the development of the additive manufacturing of functionally graded architectural structures. The potentials of the methodologies developed in this process are shown through the fabrication of a full-scale installation. By integrating material, fabrication, and design constraints into a streamlined computational methodology, the process also serves as a model for a more intuitive production workflow, expanding the understanding of glass as a material with wide-ranging possibilities for a more performative architecture.
keywords Aggregate Architectures , Digital Additive Manufacturing , Functionally Graded Materials
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email karola.dierichs@icd.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id acadia12_491
id acadia12_491
authors Feringa, Jelle ; Søndergaard, Asbjørn
year 2012
title An Integral Approach to Structural Optimization and Fabrication
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 491-497
summary Abstract Integral structural optimization and fabrication seeks the synthesis of two original approaches; that of topological optimization (TO) and robotic hotwire cutting (HWC). TO allows for the reduction of up to 70% of the volume of concrete to support a given structure. A strength of the method is that it allows to come up with structural designs that lie beyond the grasp of traditional means of design. A design space is a discretized volume, delimiting where the optimization will take place. The number of cells used to discretize the design space thus sets the resolution of the TO. While the approach of the application of TO as a constitutive design tool centers on structural aspects in the design phase, the outcome of this process are structures that cannot be realized within a conventional budget. As such the ensuing design is optimal in a narrow sense; whilst optimal structurally though, construction can be prove to be prohibitively expensive. This paper reports ongoing research efforts on the development of a cost effective methodology for the realization of TO concrete structures using HWC.
keywords Topology optimization , robotics , hotwire cutting , ruled surfaces , advanced concrete structures , formwork , EPS
series ACADIA
type panel paper
email jelleferinga@gmail.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id ecaade2012_261
id ecaade2012_261
authors Feringa, Jelle; Sondergaard, Asbjorn
year 2012
title Design and Fabrication of Topologically Optimized Structures; An Integral Approach - A Close Coupling Form Generation and Fabrication
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 495-500
wos WOS:000330320600052
summary Integral structural optimization and fabrication seeks the synthesis of two original approaches; that of topological optimization (TO) and robotic hotwire cutting (HWC) (Mcgee 2011). TO allows for the reduction of up to 70% of the volume of concrete to support a given structure (Sondergaard & Dombernowsky 2011). A strength of the method is that it allows to come up with structural designs that lie beyond the grasp of traditional means of design. A design space is a discretized volume, delimiting where the optimization will take place. The number of cells used to discretize the design space thus sets the resolution of the TO. While the approach of the application of TO as a constitutive design tool centers on structural aspects in the design phase (Xie 2010), the outcome of this process are structures that cannot be realized within a conventional budget. As such the ensuing design is optimal in a narrow sense; whilst optimal structurally though, construction can be prove to be prohibitively expensive.
keywords Topology optimization; robotics; hotwire cutting; EPS formwork; concrete structures
series eCAADe
email jelleferinga@gmail.com
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id ecaade2012_257
id ecaade2012_257
authors Fischer, Jan-Ruben
year 2012
title Optimizing Digital Organic Freeform Modelling for Fabrication by Using Parameterization With Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastics (GRP): A Case Study
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 191-200
wos WOS:000330320600019
summary In the fabrication of organic free-form shapes in architecture one is constantly faced with specifi c planning and design challenges. This paper examines these problems as well as possible solutions for the design of a completed and built prototype using the example of an organically shaped pavilion made of glass fi bre reinforced plastic modules. The paper describes which adjustments to the original design were required to take the step from “digital physicality” to “physical digitality” to realize a constructive and economically successful implementation. The solutions discussed combine modern digital software methods such as parametric design with innovative 3D modelling principles.
keywords Digital fabrication; freeform modelling; parametric design; bionic, GRP
series eCAADe
email jan-ruben.fischer@uni-weimar.de
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id sigradi2012_181
id sigradi2012_181
authors Florio, Wilson
year 2012
title Protótipo rápido de elementos construtivos produzidos pela tecnologia de sinterização seletiva a laser [Rapid prototyping of constructive elements produced by the technology of selective laser sintering]
source SIGraDi 2012 [Proceedings of the 16th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Brasil - Fortaleza 13-16 November 2012, pp. 669-672
summary The aim of this paper is to examine the physical models of constructive elements from the use of technology of selective laser sintering (SLS). The main stages in the production of rapid prototyping (PRs) were as follows: 1. Parametric Modeling (MP); 2. Geometric modeling; 3. Preparation of geometric model; 4. Execution of PR. This research contributes to debate on parametric modeling (MP) and the fabrication of very delicate physical models by technology SLS, particularly for purposes of viewing and technical evaluation during the design process in architecture.
keywords Modelagem geométrica; Prototipagem Rápida; SLS; Processo de Projeto; Modelagem Paramétrica
series SIGRADI
email wflorio@uol.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id sigradi2014_018
id sigradi2014_018
authors Florio, Wilson
year 2014
title Reflexão sobre seis residências emblemáticas a partir da tecnologia BIM e da fabricação digital [Reflection on emblematic residences from static / dynamic simulations and digital fabrication]
source SiGraDi 2014 [Proceedings of the 18th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-9974-99-655-7] Uruguay - Montevideo 12 - 14 November 2014, pp. 311-315
summary The aim of this paper is to report the teaching experience held in 2012 at Unicamp between three disciplines of representation. Students analyzed emblematic residences from digital and physical models. Digital models were produced in Revit and its building components were diagrammed in AutoCad. After that, these elements were sent to laser cutter, and hand assembled. In 3DS Max, 3D model allowed simulations such as rendered images and animations. We report the contributions of these analog and digital artifacts in the design process. This article contributes to reflection and debate on the application of digital technologies in the analysis of iconic buildings of architecture.
keywords Geometric Modeling; Digital Fabrication; Model; Revit; Teaching-learning
series SIGRADI
email wflorio@uol.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id caadria2012_098
id caadria2012_098
authors Fok, Wendy W.
year 2012
title Cross pollination of ideas: Design fabrication and experimentation
source Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Chennai 25-28 April 2012, pp. 589–598
summary The following pages show a selection of studio projects which explore the opportunistic collaborative process between commercial fabricators, material sponsorships, and the institution. The articles speaks about the intersection of design experimentation and significance of fabrication within the contained process of [design | optimisation | fabrication]. Within this process the article intersects between practice, commercialisation, and design-research, into the development arena of architectural academic outcomes. The demonstrating fact within much of the research and development also touches upon intricate details of modularity, and designing with optimisation in mind for the purpose (and ease) of fabrication, prototyping, and ‘real-life’ production. While the focus of the academic studios deliberates and uses parametric design systems through digital and analogue modelling to contribute to a full scale designed installation, and actively working with a commercial fabricator and material sponsor (Luxx Newhouse & LG Hausys HI-MACS). The aim of the courses were to acquaint students with theoretical and practical conditions needed for the creating of experimental relational modularity between geometry, scale, and materials as well as the ability to negotiate between quick intuitive studies and definitive quantifiable decisions.
keywords Design fabrication; material investigation; industry collaboration; architecture; industrial design
series CAADRIA
email wfok@alumni.princeton.edu
last changed 2012/05/29 07:34

_id caadria2012_042
id caadria2012_042
authors Globa, Anastasia and Michael Donn
year 2012
title Digital to physical: Comparative evaluation of three main CNC fabrication technologies adopted for physical modelling in architecture
source Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Chennai 25-28 April 2012, pp. 327–336
summary Recently, digital fabrication, being a logical extension of computer-aided technology to the material world, was introduced into the field of computational design in architecture. The objective of this experimental study is to investigate and systematise data regarding the production issues and limitations of the main Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) fabrication technologies adopted for physical modelling in architecture. This study also aims to observe the value of potential feedback to the design process from different types of digitally fabricated architectural models. This experimental research systematically explores digital fabrication as a computer-aided modelling tool, using two international architectural competition projects as case studies: the design of a skyscraper and relocatable schools. Developed by authors especially for this research paper, each case study acts as a test bed to compare and evaluate digital production techniques adopted for physical modelling in architecture. Designs go through a process of refinement using CNC fabrication as an integral part of the design process. Each step in the process is closely evaluated as to its effectiveness according to a matrix of feedback criteria.
keywords Design process; digital fabrication; architectural model
series CAADRIA
email Globalnaya@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/29 07:34

_id ijac201210401
id ijac201210401
authors Globa, Anastasia; Michael Donn, Simon Twose
year 2012
title Digital To Physical: Comparative Evaluation Of Three Main CNC Fabrication Technologies Adopted For Physical Modelling In Architecture
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 10 - no. 4, 461-480
summary The objective of this experimental study is to investigate and systematise data regarding the production issues and limitations of Computer Numerically Controlled fabrication technologies typically adopted for physical modelling in architecture.This study also aims to observe the value of potential feedback to the design process from different types of digitally fabricated architectural models.This experimental research systematically explores digital fabrication as a computer-aided modelling tool using two international architectural competition projects as case studies: the design of a skyscraper and relocatable schools. Developed by the authors especially for this research paper, each case study acts as a test bed to compare and evaluate digital production techniques adopted for physical modelling in architecture. Designs go through a process of refinement using CNC fabrication as an integral part of the design process. Each step in the process is closely evaluated as to its effectiveness according to a matrix of feedback criteria.
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last changed 2013/01/09 10:18

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