CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id acadia16_164
id acadia16_164
authors Braumann, Johannes; Stumm, Sven; Brell-Cokcan, Sigrid
year 2016
title Towards New Robotic Design Tools: Using Collaborative Robots within the Creative Industry
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 164-173
summary This research documents our initial experiences of using a new type of collaborative, industrial robot in the area of architecture, design, and construction. The KUKA LBR-iiwa differs from common robotic configurations in that it uses seven axes with integrated force-torque sensors and can be programmed in the Java programming language. Its force-sensitivity makes it safe to interact with, but also enables entirely new applications that use hand-guiding and utilize the force-sensors to compensate for high tolerances on building sites, similar to how we manually approach assembly tasks. Especially for the creative industry, the Java programming opens up completely new applications that would have previously required complex bus systems or industrial data interfaces. We will present a series of realized projects that showcase some of the potential of this new type of collaborative, safe robot, and discuss the advantages and limitations of the robotic system.
keywords material tolerances, individualized production, iiwa, assembly, visual robot programming, collaborative robots
series ACADIA
type paper
email johannes@robotsinarchitecture.org
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id caadria2016_539
id caadria2016_539
authors Lublasser, E.; J. Braumann, D. Goldbach and S. Brell-Cokcan
year 2016
title Robotic Forming: Rapidly Generating 3D Forms and Structures through Incremental Forming
source Living Systems and Micro-Utopias: Towards Continuous Designing, Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2016) / Melbourne 30 March–2 April 2016, pp. 539-548
summary The past years have seen significant developments in the area of robotic design interfaces. Building upon visual programming environments, these interfaces now allow the creative industry to de- fine even complex fabrication processes in an easy, accessible way, while providing instant, production-immanent feedback. However, while these software tools greatly speed up the programming of robot- ic arms, many processes are still inherently slow: Subtractive process- es need to remove a large amount of material with comparably small tools, while additive processes are limited by the speed of the extruder and the properties of the extruded material. In this research we present a new method for incrementally shaping transparent polymer materi- als with a robotic arm, without requiring heat or dies for deep- drawing, thus allowing us to rapidly fabricate individual panels within a minimum of time.
keywords Incremental forming; robotic fabrication; visual programming
series CAADRIA
email lublasser@ip.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2016/03/11 09:21

_id acadia16_214
id acadia16_214
authors Schwartz, Mathew
year 2016
title Use of a Low-Cost Humanoid for Tiling as a Study in On-Site Fabrication: Techniques and Methods
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 214-223
summary Since the time architecture and construction began embracing robotics, the pre-fab movement has grown rapidly. As the possibilities for new design and fabrication emerge from creativity and need, the application and use of new robotic technologies becomes vital. This movement has been largely focused on the deployment of industrial-type robots used in the (automobile) manufacturing industry for decades, as well as trying to apply these technologies into off-site building construction. Beyond the pre-fab (off-site) conditions, on-site fabrication offers a valuable next step to implement new construction methods and reduce human work-related injuries. The main challenge in introducing on-site robotic fabrication/construction is the difficulty in calibrating robot navigation (localization) in an unstructured and constantly changing environment. Additionally, advances in robotic technology, similar to the revolution of at-home 3D printing, shift the ownership of modes of production from large industrial entities to individuals, allowing for greater levels of design and construction customization. This paper demonstrates a low-cost humanoid robot as highly customizable technology for floor tiling. A novel end-effector design to pick up tiles was developed, along with a localization system that can be applied to a wide variety of robots.
keywords humanoid robot, digital fabricaiton, sensate systems
series ACADIA
type paper
email umcadop@gmail.com
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id acadia16_184
id acadia16_184
authors Vasey; Lauren; Long Nguyen; Tovi Grossman; Heather Kerrick; Danil Nagy; Evan Atherton; David Thomasson; Nick Cote; David Benjamin; George Fitzmaurice; Achim Menges
year 2016
title Collaborative Construction: Human and Robotic Collaboration Enabling the Fabrication and Assembly of a Filament-Wound Structure
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 184-195
summary In this paper, we describe an interdisciplinary project and live-exhibit that investigated whether untrained humans and robots could work together collaboratively towards the common goal of building a large-scale structure composed out of robotically fabricated modules using a filament winding process. We describe the fabrication system and exhibition setup, including a custom end effector and tension control mechanism, as well as a collaborative fabrication process in which instructions delivered via wearable devices enable the trade-off of production and assembly tasks between human and robot. We describe the necessary robotic developments that facilitated a live fabrication process, including a generic robot inverse kinematic solver engine for non-spherical wrist robots, and wireless network communication connecting hardware and software. In addition, we discuss computational strategies for the fiber syntax generation and robotic motion planning which mitigated constraints such as reachability, axis limitations, and collisions, and ensured predictable and therefore safe motion in a live exhibition setting. We discuss the larger implications of this project as a case study for handling deviations due to non-standardized materials or human error, as well as a means to reconsider the fundamental separation of human and robotic tasks in a production workflow. Most significantly, the project exemplifies a hybrid domain of human and robot collaboration in which coordination and communication between robots, people, and devices can enhance the integration of robotic processes and computational control into the characteristic processes of construction.
keywords machin vision, cyber-physical systems, internet of things, robotic fabrication, human robot collaboration, sensate systems
series ACADIA
type paper
email lauren.vasey@icd.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2016/11/17 09:20

_id caadria2016_569
id caadria2016_569
authors Williams, Nicholas and Dharman Gersch
year 2016
title Developing the Termite Plug-In: Abstracting operations to link 5-axis CNC routers with para-metric CAAD tools
source Living Systems and Micro-Utopias: Towards Continuous Designing, Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2016) / Melbourne 30 March–2 April 2016, pp. 569-578
summary Since the turn of the millennium, architects and designers have used greater access to Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) machines to explore links between design and fabrication. This trend is recently manifested in plug-ins for CAD software packages, which enable designers to program industrial robots and additive manufac- turing machines. However, amongst the array of contemporary tools, few connect CAD packages to commercial 5-axis routers and, as a re- sult, designers are forced to use complex CAM software to operate these machines with limited exploration of the interface with design. This paper reports on the development of a CAD plug-in for driving such routers and targeted at designers. It discusses key aspects in the conception of the software libraries for an alpha release of the tool, a plug-in for McNeel Grasshopper named Termite. Primary considera- tions for the development team include the areas and extent of flexi- bility offered in order to enable non-expert users of such machines to use them to in an effective and efficient manner. Key elements of the tools are discussed, including the definition of machining tools, the creation of generic toolpaths and the subsequent writing machine-code files. A set of example pieces are presented to demonstrate the pro- posed approach for flank-milling, patterning and connecting timber components at a furniture scale. These are compared to plug-ins for industrial robot with similar technical knowledge and experience amongst the target audience.
keywords Digital fabrication; parametric design; architectural proto-types; digital material
series CAADRIA
email nicholas.williams@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2016/03/11 09:21

_id acadia16_98
id acadia16_98
authors Smith, Shane Ida; Lasch, Chris
year 2016
title Machine Learning Integration for Adaptive Building Envelopes: An Experimental Framework for Intelligent Adaptive Control
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 98-105
summary This paper describes the development of an Intelligent Adaptive Control (IAC) framework that uses machine learning to integrate responsive passive conditioning at the envelope into a building’s comprehensive conventional environmental control system. Initial results show that by leveraging adaptive computational control to orchestrate the building’s mechanical and passive systems together, there exists a demonstrably greater potential to maximize energy efficiency than can be gained by focusing on either system individually, while the addition of more passive conditioning strategies significantly increase human comfort, health and wellness building-wide. Implicitly, this project suggests that, given the development and ever increasing adoption of building automation systems, a significant new site for computational design in architecture is expanding within the post-occupancy operation of a building, in contrast to architects’ traditional focus on the building’s initial design. Through the development of an experimental framework that includes physical material testing linked to computational simulation, this project begins to describe a set of tools and procedures by which architects might better conceptualize, visualize, and experiment with the design of adaptive building envelopes. This process allows designers to ultimately engage in the opportunities presented by active systems that govern the daily interactions between a building, its inhabitants, and their environment long after construction is completed. Adaptive material assemblies at the envelope are given special attention since it is here that a building’s performance and urban expression are most closely intertwined.
keywords model predictive control, reinforcement learning, energy performance, adaptive envelope, sensate systems
series ACADIA
type paper
email shaneida@u.arizona.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id caadria2016_209
id caadria2016_209
authors Wang, Likai; Zilong Tan and Guohua Ji
year 2016
title Toward the wind-related building performative design
source Living Systems and Micro-Utopias: Towards Continuous Designing, Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2016) / Melbourne 30 March–2 April 2016, pp. 109-218
summary The integration of optimization algorithms and building performance simulation tools make it possible to carry out performa- tive design or performance-driven design, which aims to guide the de- sign synthesis process of the simulation results to continuously im- prove the design. However, the associated research work of wind- related building performance is still deficient, resulting from lack of applicable interface and the time consumption. Meanwhile, in the in- dustrial design realm, the aero-dynamics or fluid-dynamics behaviour of the production under development has been vastly analysed and op- timized based on the multi-discipline optimization (MDO) techniques. Owing to offering numerous built-in interface and integrated optimi- zation algorithm, MDO application software has begun to be used in building optimization design with the complex relationship between various objectives. With the advantage of MDO tools and aimed to provide an efficient optimization approach from the perspective of ar- chitect, this paper proposes a wind-related building performance op- timization design system integrating Rhinoceros and Fluent based on iSIGHT - a MDO application software. In addition, the lighting per- formance is considered in this research as well for implementing the multi-objective optimization. Two case studies of tall building optimi- zation design based on varied generative approaches are introduced to investigate the effect and efficiency of this system.
keywords Performative design; wind-related building performance; MDO; parametric generating design
series CAADRIA
email DG1436002@smail.nju.edu.cn
last changed 2016/03/11 09:21

_id caadria2016_353
id caadria2016_353
authors Yuan, Feng; Shuyi Huang and Tong Xiao
year 2016
title Physical and numerical simulation as a generative design tool
source Living Systems and Micro-Utopias: Towards Continuous Designing, Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2016) / Melbourne 30 March–2 April 2016, pp. 353-362
summary Environmentally sound and high-performance buildings are contributing towards a sustainable future. With increased density of contemporary urban space and the urgent desire to promote building performance, a better understanding of wind behaviour will positively influence future design explorations. In the traditional sequential ar- chitectural practice, there is a gap between design and performance simulation. This paper presents an experimental and systematic study of the performance-oriented design tools, strategies and workflows utilized in the concept prototyping of a high-rise building. It describes a new approach to incorporate wind tunnel testing, computational flu- id dynamics simulation as well as parametric software, sensors and open-source electronics platform into an accessible, interactive and low-cost form generation kit, rapidly evaluating the performance of potential design options in the early design stage. As indicated in this research, environmental simulation can be a decision-making tool, in- tegrating the concept of continuity into the design process.
keywords Environmental performance; building aerodynamics; wind tunnel testing; computational fluid dynamics
series CAADRIA
email philipyuan007@tongji.edu.cn
last changed 2016/03/11 09:21

_id ecaade2016_162
id ecaade2016_162
authors Heinrich, Mary Katherine and Ayres, Phil
year 2016
title Using the Phase Space to Design Complexity - Design Methodology for Distributed Control of Architectural Robotic Elements
source Herneoja, Aulikki; Toni Österlund and Piia Markkanen (eds.), Complexity & Simplicity - Proceedings of the 34th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland, 22-26 August 2016, pp. 413-422
summary Architecture that is responsive, adaptive, or interactive can contain active architectural elements or robotic sensor-actuator systems. The consideration of architectural robotic elements that utilize distributed control and distributed communication allows for self-organization, emergence, and evolution on site in real-time. The potential complexity of behaviors in such architectural robotic systems requires design methodology able to encompass a range of possible outcomes, rather than a single solution. We present an approach of adopting an aspect of complexity science and applying it to the realm of computational design in architecture, specifically by considering the phase space and related concepts. We consider the scale and predictability of certain design characteristics, and originate the concept of a formation space extension to the phase space, for design to deal directly with materializations left by robot swarms or elements, rather than robots' internal states. We detail a case study examination of design methodology using the formation space concept for assessment and decision-making in the design of active architectural artifacts.
wos WOS:000402063700046
keywords phase space; complexity; attractor; distributed control
series eCAADe
email mhei@kadk.dk
last changed 2017/06/28 08:46

_id caadria2016_373
id caadria2016_373
authors Heinrich, Mary Katherine and Phil Ayres
year 2016
title For Time-Continuous Optimisation: Replacing Automation with Interactive Visualisation in Multi-Objective Behavioural Design
source Living Systems and Micro-Utopias: Towards Continuous Designing, Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2016) / Melbourne 30 March–2 April 2016, pp. 373-382
summary Strategies for optimisation in design normatively assume an artefact end-point, disallowing continuous architecture that engages living systems, dynamic behaviour, and complex systems. In our Flora Robotica investigations of symbiotic plant-robot bio-hybrids, we re- quire computational tools and strategies that help us evaluate designed behaviours, rather than discrete ‘things’. In this paper, we present our strategy of using embodied interaction to facilitate engagement with a scenario’s full scope of possible states and their continuous changes over time. We detail the ways in which this approach to time- continuous optimisation can be broadly impactful for decision- making, especially in architectural systems that aspire to effective dealings with control flows and lifecycle management.
keywords Multi-objective; dynamic; visualisation; interaction; optimisation
series CAADRIA
email mhei@kadk.dk
last changed 2016/03/11 09:21

_id caadria2016_529
id caadria2016_529
authors Rust, Romana; David Jenny, Fabio Gramazio and Matthias Kohler
year 2016
title Spatial Wire Cutting: Cooperative robotic cutting of non-ruled surface geometries for bespoke building components
source Living Systems and Micro-Utopias: Towards Continuous Designing, Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2016) / Melbourne 30 March–2 April 2016, pp. 529-538
summary The research project Spatial Wire Cutting (SWC) investi- gates a multi-robotic cutting technique that allows for an efficient production of geometrically complex architectural components. Being pursued by the group of Gramazio Kohler Research at ETH Zurich, this approach involves a spatially coordinated movement of two six- axis robotic arms that control the curvature of a hot-wire, which adopts itself against the resistance of the processed material (e.g. pol- ystyrene). In contrast to standard CNC hot-wire cutting processes, in which the cutting medium remains linear, it allows the automated fab- rication of non-ruled, doubly curved surfaces. This pursuit includes the development of a custom digital design and robotic control framework that combines computational simulation and manufactur- ing feedback information. Ultimately, SWC enables a considerably expanded design and fabrication space for complex architectural ge- ometries and their construction through automated robotic technology. This paper addresses the applied workflow and technology 1) such as computational design and simulation, robotic control and adaptive fabrication, 2) results of application within a two-week design and building workshop, and 3) will conclude with further steps of future research.
keywords Computational design and digital fabrication; feedback-based automated manufacturing; multi-robot control; digital simulation; hot-wire cutting
series CAADRIA
email rust@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2016/03/11 09:21

_id ecaade2016_063
id ecaade2016_063
authors Al-Qattan, Emad, Galanter, Philip and Yan, Wei
year 2016
title Developing a Tangible User Interface for Parametric and BIM Applications Using Physical Computing Systems.
source Herneoja, Aulikki; Toni Österlund and Piia Markkanen (eds.), Complexity & Simplicity - Proceedings of the 34th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland, 22-26 August 2016, pp. 621-630
summary This paper discusses the development of an interactive and a responsive Tangible User-Interface (TUI) for parametric and Building Information Modeling (BIM) applications. The prototypes presented in this paper utilizes physical computing systems to establish a flexible and intuitive method to engage digital design processes.The prototypes are hybrid UIs that consist of a digital modeling tool and an artifact. The artifact consists of a control system (sensors, actuators, and microcontrollers) and physical objects (architectural elements). The link between both environments associates physical objects with their digital design information to assist users in the digital design process. The integration of physical computing systems will enable the objects to physically respond to analog input and provide real-time feedback to users. The research aims to foster tangible computing methods to extend the capabilities of digital design tools. The prototypes demonstrate a method that allows architects to simultaneously interact with complex architectural systems digitally and physically.
wos WOS:000402064400063
keywords Physical Computing; Parametric Design; BIM; Tangible UI
series eCAADe
email emadkkqattan@tamu.edu
last changed 2017/06/28 08:46

_id sigradi2016_710
id sigradi2016_710
authors Duarte, Rovenir Bertola; Lepri, Louisa Savignon; Sanches, Malu Magalh?es
year 2016
title Objectile e o projeto paramétrico [Objectile and parametric design]
source SIGraDi 2016 [Proceedings of the 20th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-956-7051-86-1] Argentina, Buenos Aires 9 - 11 November 2016, pp.149-156
summary The objectile was a concept developed by Deleuze and Cache in the 80s. It treats the object as a variable and anticipates the society of obsolescence, an inquiry about the contemporary life of the object (marketing, function, representation, modeling, production and consumption). This concept deals with the object where“... fluctuation of the norm replaces the permanence of a law; where the object assumes a place in a continuum by variation” (Deleuze, 1991, p.38). This paper proposes to think objectile as the object of the architectural design, on three types of approximations between design and objectile: (a) Objectile as variable of the design, (b) Objectile as a design variable, and (c) Objectile as architecture (variable architecture). The second approximation (b) enables to discuss the conception of continuous design with power to cross other projects - a meta-design. The main aspect of this meta-design is the variability, another way of control based on concepts of patterns and modulations; however, objectile can mean the release of mind for new types of thought and new kinds of design based on “continuum by variation”: meta-design.
keywords Objectile; parametric design; Gilles Deleuze; Modulado; Digital design
series SIGraDi
email rovenir@uel.br
last changed 2017/06/21 12:20

_id ijac201614306
id ijac201614306
authors Kuan-Ying, Wu and Hou June-Hao
year 2016
title Spark Wall: Control responsive environment by human behaviour
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 14 - no. 3, 255-262
summary Responsive environment uses human–computer interface to improve how humans experience their surroundings. Many research aimed at different kinds of interactive environment modules with new digital tectonics or computation components. However, those new environments sometimes could be manipulated by components which are less user-friendly and complex than traditional counterparts. In this article, we implemented a real responsive interface – the Spark Wall system, which use 160 actuator modules as our responsive feedback interface and depth camera as sensing input. We built up multi-modal interface for different operating purposes allowing the user to control responsive environment with their behaviour. The user could change his or her body posture to change the pattern of the wall and moreover define touch-input area on any surface. From the user’s perspective, a responsive environment should be a simple system with understandable control modes. A responsive artefact should also be able to dynamically correspond to different methods of operation according to the user’s intentions.
keywords Responsive environment, human–computer interface, surface computing, multi-modal interface, depth sensing
series journal
last changed 2016/10/05 06:21

_id ecaade2016_043
id ecaade2016_043
authors Wit, Andrew and Kim, Simon
year 2016
title rolyPOLY - A Hybrid Prototype for Digital Techniques and Analog Craft in Architecture
source Herneoja, Aulikki; Toni Österlund and Piia Markkanen (eds.), Complexity & Simplicity - Proceedings of the 34th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland, 22-26 August 2016, pp. 631-638
summary The rapid emergence of computational design tools, advanced material systems and robotic fabrication within the disciplines of architecture and construction has granted designers immense freedom in form and assembly, while retaining pronounced control over output quality throughout the entirety of the design and fabrication process. Simultaneously, the complexity inherent within these tools and processes can lead to a loss of craft though the production of methodologies, forms and artifacts left with extremely recognizable residues from tooling processes utilized during their production. This paper investigates the fecund intersection of digital technologies and handcraft through core-less carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) winding as a means of creating a new typology of digital craft blurring the line between human and machine. Through the lens of an innovative wound CFRP shelter rolyPOLY completed during the winter of 2015, this paper will show the exigencies and affordances between the realms of digital and analog methodologies of CFRP winding on large-scale structures.
wos WOS:000402063700068
keywords additive manufacturing; composites; form finding; craft; analog / digital
series eCAADe
email andrew.wit@temple.edu
last changed 2017/06/28 08:46

_id caadria2016_033
id caadria2016_033
authors Zhang, Yingyi and Marc Aurel Schnabel
year 2016
title Form-Based Code in Parametric Modelling for Continuous Urban Design
source Living Systems and Micro-Utopias: Towards Continuous Designing, Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2016) / Melbourne 30 March–2 April 2016, pp. 33-42
summary This paper analyses parametric modelling in connection with the Form-based Code (FBC) methodology to support continuous design in an urban scale. FBC is an approach to optimize conventional zoning regulations and has been implemented by a number of cities. Akin to a utopian urban design solution, we argue that the FBC is cru- cial to develop main objectives, characteristics, trends and impacts in a design process systematically and logically. Zoning emphasizes ex- cessively on land use and intensity control, however, FBC promotes to (re-)create and predict urban-rural environments through controlling forms. FBC is developing and offers opportunities for flexible coding processes, adjustment of density and seamless public participation. Parametric modelling, being rule based, is a significant step towards a continuous urban design creating a mechanism for FBC. This paper presents a framework to connect parametric modelling with FBC pro- cesses, and how parametric modelling methodologies allow the form- based coding processes to be more impeccable hence being more ap- propriate in the process of continuous design flow.
keywords Form-based code; continuous urban design; parametric modelling; utopian design solution
series CAADRIA
email yingyi.zhang@vuw.ac.nz
last changed 2016/03/11 09:21

_id caadria2016_559
id caadria2016_559
authors Cokcan, Baris; Johannes Braumann, W. Winter and Martin Trautz
year 2016
title Robotic Production of Individualised Wood Joints
source Living Systems and Micro-Utopias: Towards Continuous Designing, Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2016) / Melbourne 30 March–2 April 2016, pp. 559-568
summary Modern modular constructions can consist of highly indi- vidualised elements that are produced at nearly the same efficiency as serial manufacturing. This paper focuses on the project “WoodWaves” an Info-Point for the conference World Congress of Timber Engineer- ing, which was designed with this new conception of modularity. The process utilises a robotically operated milling cutter to form block- board panels out of spruce, which make up the multifunctional infor- mation point. The entire object is produced with only sliding dovetail joints. Parametric design methods were developed to automatically adjust each joint to fit the individual conditions. New CAD/CAM in- terfaces, linking design directly with fabrication, enabled the serial production of 108 different shaped elements with a 6-axis robotic arm.
keywords Computational design; robotic production; digital fabrication; wood joints; info-point
series CAADRIA
email bcokcan@trako.arch.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2016/03/11 09:21

_id sigradi2016_805
id sigradi2016_805
authors Cormack, Jordan; Sweet, Kevin S.
year 2016
title Parametrically Fabricated Joints: Creating a Digital Workflow
source SIGraDi 2016 [Proceedings of the 20th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-956-7051-86-1] Argentina, Buenos Aires 9 - 11 November 2016, pp.412-417
summary Timber joinery for furniture and architectural purpose has always been identified as a skill or craft. The craft is the demonstration of hand machined skill and precision which is passed down or developed through the iteration of creation and refined reflection. Using digital fabrication techniques provides new, typically unexplored ways of creating and designing joints. It is as if these limitations which bind the ratio of complexity and use are stretched. This means that these joints, from a technical standpoint, can be more advanced than historically hand-made joints as digital machines are not bound by the limitations of the human. The research investigated in this paper explores the ability to create sets of joints in a parametric environment that will be produced with CNC machines, thus redefining the idea of the joint through contemporary tools of creation and fabrication. The research also aims to provide a seamless, digital workflow from the flexible, parametric creation of the joint to the final physical fabrication of it. Traditional joints, more simple in shape and assembly, were first digitally created to ease the educational challenges of learning a computational workflow that entailed the creation and fabrication of geometrically programmed joints. Following the programming and manufacturing of these traditional joints, more advanced and complex joints were created as the understanding of the capabilities of the software and CNC machines developed. The more complex and varied joints were taken from a CAD virtual environment and tested on a 3-axis CNC machine and 3D printer. The transformation from the virtual environment to the physical highlighted areas that required further research and testing. The programmed joint was then refined using the feedback from the digital to physical process creating a more robust joint that was informed by reality.
keywords Joinery; digital fabrication; parametric; scripting; machining
series SIGraDi
email kevin.sweet@vuw.ac.nz
last changed 2017/06/21 12:21

_id caadria2016_767
id caadria2016_767
authors De Azambuja Varela, Pedro and Timothy Merritt
year 2016
title CorkVault Aarhus: exploring stereotomic design space of cork and 5-axis CNC waterjet cutting
source Living Systems and Micro-Utopias: Towards Continuous Designing, Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2016) / Melbourne 30 March–2 April 2016, pp. 767-776
summary This paper presents the design, fabrication, and construc- tion of CorkVault Aarhus, which was designed using parametric and physics simulation software and realized from ECA cork sheets cut using a CNC waterjet cutter. We recount the lessons learned through the intensive two-week workshop that explored the limits of the mate- rials and tools through prototypes and culminated with the assembly of the final free-form vault structure. Various vaults and arch proto- types provided pedagogical and research value, building up knowledge essential to the final structure built, a human scale pavilion designed and built in three days and made of a thin shell of cork pan- els working only in compression. Three driving concepts were crucial to the experience: stereotomy as a supporting theory, expanded cork agglomerate (ECA) as the main material and water jet cutting as the principal means of fabrication. The complex vault shape called for precise 5-axis cuts supporting a new paradigm in building stereotomic components for architecture.
keywords Stereotomy; generative algorithm; digital fabrication; waterjet; cork
series CAADRIA
email pvarela@arq.up.pt
last changed 2016/03/11 09:21

_id acadia16_206
id acadia16_206
authors Devadass, Pradeep; Dailami, Farid; Mollica, Zachary; Self, Martin
year 2016
title Robotic Fabrication of Non-Standard Material
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp
summary This paper illustrates a fabrication methodology through which the inherent form of large non-linear timber components was exploited in the Wood Chip Barn project by the students of Design + Make at the Architectural Association’s Hooke Park campus. Twenty distinct Y-shaped forks are employed with minimal machining in the construction of a structural truss for the building. Through this workflow, low-value branched sections of trees are transformed into complex and valuable building components using non-standard technologies. Computational techniques, including parametric algorithms and robotic fabrication methods, were used for execution of the project. The paper addresses the various challenges encountered while processing irregular material, as well as limitations of the robotic tools. Custom algorithms, codes, and post-processors were developed and integrated with existing software packages to compensate for drawbacks of industrial and parametric platforms. The project demonstrates and proves a new methodology for working with complex, large geometries which still results in a low cost, time- and quality-efficient process.
keywords parametric design, craft in digital communication, digital fabrication, sensate systems
series ACADIA
type paper
email pappurvsa@gmail.com
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

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