CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 179

_id ecaade2017_039
id ecaade2017_039
authors Weissenböck, Renate
year 2017
title ROBOTRACK - Linking manual and robotic design processes by motion-tracking
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 651-660
summary This study investigates design opportunities fostered by fabrication processes, ex-ploring manual and robotic forming. It links handcraft and digital fabrication techniques by implementing a motion capture system. It suggests physical prototyping as a novel form of design research, operating in the dynamic field between human capabilities, machine skills, and material behavior. This paper presents a series of experimental case studies created in a seminar taught by the author at Graz University of Technology. In this course, students con-duct tactile experiments, forming panels by hand and by robot, guided by the material behav-ior and reaction. Thereby, they explore the creation of architectural form in a dynamic inter-play between human, machine and material. Movement and speed of hand forming proce-dures are recorded into digital data, and then converted into machine code, driving a 6-axis industrial robotic arm. By using the same set-up for manual and robotic forming, both pro-cesses are relatable.
keywords design by making; digital fabrication; robotic fabrication; thermoforming; material behavior; motion tracking; craft; design education; design research; intuition; human machine interaction
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email r_weissenboeck@hotmail.com
last changed 2017/11/09 08:32

_id ecaade2017_046
id ecaade2017_046
authors Ezzat, Mohammed
year 2017
title Implementing the General Theory for Finding the Lightest Manmade Structures Using Voronoi and Delaunay
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 241-250
summary In previous efforts, the foundation of a general theory that searches for finding lightest manmade structures using the Delaunay diagram or its dual the Voronoi diagram was set (Ezzat, 2016). That foundation rests on using a simple and computationally cheap Centroid method. The simple Centroid method is expected to play a crucial role in the more sophisticated general theory. The Centroid method was simply about classifying a cloud of points that represents specific load case/s stresses on any object. That classification keeps changing using mathematical functions until optimal structures are found. The point cloud then is classified into different smaller points' groups; each of these groups was represented by a single positional point that is related to the points' group mean. Those representational points were used to generate the Delaunay or Voronoi diagrams, which are tested structurally to prove or disprove the optimality of the classification. There was not a single optimized classification out of that process but rather a family of them. The point cloud was the input to the centroid structural optimization, and the family of the optimized centroid method is the input to our proposed implementation of the general theory (see Figure 1). The centroid method produced promising optimized structures that performed from five to ten times better than the other tested variations. The centroid method was implemented using the two structural plugins of Millipede and Karmaba, which run under the environment of the Grasshopper plugin. The optimization itself is done using the grasshopper's component of Galapagos.
keywords Agent-based structural optimization; Evolutionary conceptual tree representation; Heuristic structural knowledge acquisition ; Centroid structural classification optimization method
series eCAADe
email mohammed.ezzat@guc.edu.eg
last changed 2017/09/13 13:31

_id cf2017_360
id cf2017_360
authors Ofluo?lu, Salih
year 2017
title BIM-based Interdisciplinary Collaborations in a Student Project Competition
source Gülen Çagdas, Mine Özkar, Leman F. Gül and Ethem Gürer (Eds.) Future Trajectories of Computation in Design [17th International Conference, CAAD Futures 2017, Proceedings / ISBN 978-975-561-482-3] Istanbul, Turkey, July 12-14, 2017, pp. 360-373.
summary Architecture is a profession that requires collaboration among professionals from various fields. Despite the important nature of these interdisciplinary collaborations, architecture students rarely obtain the opportunity to learn about the work areas of other stakeholders and the practice of working together. In all sectors there is a growing need for professionals who possess in-depth knowledge in their own disciplines and also develop an understanding about other related disciplines. In a setting of a student project competition, this article examines how students from various AEC fields collaborate using BIM as a common data environment and emphasizes several considerations for implementing interdisciplinary collaborations in curriculums of architecture schools in students’ perspective.
keywords Interdisciplinary Collaborations, Architectural Design Studio, BIM, Building Information Modeling
series CAAD Futures
email salih.ofluoglu@msgsu.edu.tr
last changed 2017/12/01 13:38

_id ecaade2017_124
id ecaade2017_124
authors Pantazis, Evangelos and Gerber, David
year 2017
title Emergent order through swarm fluctuations - A framework for exploring self-organizing structures using swarm robotics
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 75-84
summary In modern architecture, construction processes are based on top down planning, yet in nature but also in vernacular architecture, the shape of shelters/nests is the result of evolutionary material processes which takes place without any global coordination or plan. This work presents a framework for exploring how self-organizing structures can be achieved in a bottom up fashion by implementing a swarm of simple robots(bristle bots). The robots are used as a hardware platform and operate in a modular 2D arena filled with differently shaped passive building blocks. The robots push around blocks and their behaviour can be programmed mechanically by changing the geometry of their body. Through physical experimentation and video analysis the relationships between the properties of the emergent patterns (size, temporal stability) and the geometry of the robot/parts are studied. This work couples a set of agent based design tools with a robust robotic system and a set of analysis tools for generating and actualising emergent 2D structures.
keywords Multi Agent Systems; Generative Design; Swarm Robotics; Self-organizing patterns
series eCAADe
email epantazi@usc.edu
last changed 2017/09/13 13:12

_id ecaade2017_202
id ecaade2017_202
authors Sollazzo, Aldo, Trento, Armando and Baseta, Efilena
year 2017
title Machinic Agency - Implementing aerial robotics and machine learning to map public space
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 611-618
summary The research presented in this paper is focused on proposing a new digital workflow, involving unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and machines learning systems, in order to detect and map citizen's behaviors in the context of public spaces.Novel machinic abilities can be implemented in the understanding of the human context, decoding, through computer visions and machine learning, complex systems into intelligible outputs (Olson, 2008), mapping the relationships of our reality. In this framework, robotic and computational strategies can be implemented in order to offer a new description of public spaces, bringing to light the hidden forces and multiple layers constituting the urban habitat. The presented study focuses on the development of a methodology turning video frames collected from cameras installed on drones into large datasets used to train convolutional networks and enable machines learning systems to detect and map pedestrians in public spaces.
keywords mapping; drones; machine learning; computer vision; city
series eCAADe
email aldo@noumena.io
last changed 2017/09/13 13:30

_id acadia17_110
id acadia17_110
authors Arnowitz, Ethan; Morse, Christopher; Greenberg, Donald P.
year 2017
title vSpline: Physical Design and the Perception of Scale in Virtual Reality
source ACADIA 2017: DISCIPLINES & DISRUPTION [Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-96506-1] Cambridge, MA 2-4 November, 2017), pp. 110-117
summary Virtual reality provides a heightened sense of immersion and spatial awareness that provides a unique opportunity for designers to perceive and evaluate scale and space. At the same time, traditional sketches and small-size physical models provide tactile feedback that allow designers to create, comprehend, and explore complex geometric relationships. Through the development of vSpline, a modeling application for virtual reality, we explore the potential for design within a virtual spatial environment to blur the boundaries between digital and physical stages of design, and seek to combine the best of both virtual and analog worlds. By using spline-based closed meshes created directly in three-dimensional space, our software provides the capabilities to design, modify, and save the information in the virtual world and seamlessly convert the data to evaluate the printing of 3D physical models. We identify and discuss important questions that arise regarding relationships of perception of scale, digital-to-physical domains, and new methods of input and manipulation within a 3D immersive space.
keywords design methods; information processing; hci; vr; ar; mixed reality; digital craft; manual craft
series ACADIA
email eha38@cornell.edu
last changed 2017/10/17 09:12

_id acadia17_128
id acadia17_128
authors Bacharidou, Maroula
year 2017
title Touch, See, Make: Employing Active Touch in Computational Making
source ACADIA 2017: DISCIPLINES & DISRUPTION [Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-96506-1] Cambridge, MA 2-4 November, 2017), pp. 128-137
summary In architectural education and practice, we don’t come in physical contact with what we make until the later stages of the design process. This vision-oriented approach to design is something deeply rooted in architectural practice: from Alberti’s window to the screens of our computers, design has traditionally been more of a visual and less of a hands-on process. The vision of the presented study is that if we want to understand the way we make in order to improve tools for computational design and making, we need to understand how our ability to make things is enhanced by both our visual and tactile mechanisms. Bringing the notion of active touch from psychology into the design studio, I design and execute a series of experiments investigating how seeing, touching, or seeing and touching exhibit different sensory competencies, and how these competencies are expressed through the process of making. The subjects of the experiment are asked to tactilely, visually, or tactilely and visually observe a three-dimensional object, create descriptions of its composition, and to remake it based on their experience of it using plastic materials. After the execution of the experiment, I analyze twenty-one reproductions of the original object; I point to ways in which touch can detect scale and proportions more accurately than vision, while vision can detect spatial components more efficiently than touch; I then propose ways in which this series of experiments can lead to the creation of new design and making tools.
keywords education society & culture; computational / artistic culture;s hybrid practices; digital craft; manual craft
series ACADIA
email maroulab@mit.edu
last changed 2017/10/17 09:12

_id sigradi2017_070
id sigradi2017_070
authors Borda, Adriane
year 2017
title Tactile narratives about an architecture’s ornaments
source SIGraDi 2017 [Proceedings of the 21th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-956-227-439-5] Chile, Concepción 22 - 24 November 2017, pp.479-485
summary This study experiments a process of production of tactile representations of architectural elements of a nineteenth century mansion, house to a university museum: Museu do Doce, Pelotas, RS. The Museum uses the concept of Universal Design to guide its direct and/or mediated communication solutions. The house is distinguished by ceilings of ornamental stuccoes, evidently perceived only by the sense of sight. To describe them, a set of representations is being produced, using 3D scanning and digital fabrication technologies, using formal decomposition, and different scales, to construct a narrative to be understood by touching.
keywords Tactile models; Universal Design; Architectural heritage; Representation technologies; Stuccoes.
series SIGraDi
email adribord@hotmail.com
last changed 2018/07/27 08:08

_id caadria2018_333
id caadria2018_333
authors Cupkova, Dana, Byrne, Daragh and Cascaval, Dan
year 2018
title Sentient Concrete - Developing Embedded Thermal and Thermochromic Interactions for Architecture and Built Environment
source T. Fukuda, W. Huang, P. Janssen, K. Crolla, S. Alhadidi (eds.), Learning, Adapting and Prototyping - Proceedings of the 23rd CAADRIA Conference - Volume 2, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, 17-19 May 2018, pp. 545-554
summary Historically, architectural design focused on adaptation of built environment to serve human needs. Recently embedded computation and digital fabrication have advanced means to actuate physical infrastructure in real-time. These 'reactive spaces' have typically explored movement and media as a means to achieve reactivity and physical deformation (Chatting et al. 2017). However, here we recontextualize 'reactive' as finding new mechanisms for permanent and non-deformable everyday materials and environments. In this paper, we describe our ongoing work to create a series of complex forms - modular concrete panels - using thermal, tactile and thermochromic responses controlled by embedded networked system. We create individualized pathways to thermally actuate these surfaces and explore expressive methods to respond to the conditions around these forms - the environment, the systems that support them, their interaction and relationships to human occupants. We outline the design processes to achieve thermally adaptive concrete panels, illustrate interactive scenarios that our system enables, and discuss opportunities for new forms of interactivity within the built environment.
keywords Responsive environments; Geometrically induced thermodynamics; Ambient devices; Internet of things; Modular electronic systems
series CAADRIA
email cupkova@cmu.edu
last changed 2018/05/17 07:08

_id ecaade2017_208
id ecaade2017_208
authors Beaudry Marchand, Emmanuel, Han, Xueying and Dorta, Tomás
year 2017
title Immersive retrospection by video-photogrammetry - UX assessment tool of interactions in museums, a case study
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 729-738
summary Studying interactions in museums often omits to consider the complexity of the space and the visitors' behaviors. Visitors' walking paths do not provide enough insight of their user experience (UX) since they are distant from the experiential realities. Videogrammetry can convey such dimensions of an environmental experience. Because of limitations of real-time playback, a twofold approach is suggested: "immersive videos" combined with "photogrammetric models". A granular optimal experience assessment method using retrospection interviews is also applied providing a finer evaluation of the perceived experience through time. This method permits to characterize museum interactive installations, according to the perceived challenges and skills of the interaction's task, based this time on immersive retrospection. This paper proposes the "Immersive retrospection" by "Immersive video-photogrammetry" as a UX assessment tool of interactions in museums. A hybrid virtual environment was used in this study, allowing social VR without the use of headsets, through a life-sized projection of interactive 3D content. The study showed that Immersive video-photogrammetry facilitates the recall of memories and allows a deepened self-observation analysis.
keywords immersive retrospection; photogrammetry; videogrammetry; UX assessment; museum environments
series eCAADe
email tomas.dorta@umontreal.ca
last changed 2017/09/13 13:30

_id acadia17_202
id acadia17_202
authors Cupkova, Dana; Promoppatum, Patcharapit
year 2017
title Modulating Thermal Mass Behavior Through Surface Figuration
source ACADIA 2017: DISCIPLINES & DISRUPTION [Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-96506-1] Cambridge, MA 2-4 November, 2017), pp. 202-211
summary This research builds upon a previous body of work focused on the relationship between surface geometry and heat transfer coefficients in thermal mass passive systems. It argues for the design of passive systems with higher fidelity to multivariable space between performance and perception. Rooted in the combination of form and matter, the intention is to instrumentalize design principles for the choreography of thermal gradients between buildings and their environment from experiential, spatial and topological perspectives (Figure 1). Our work is built upon the premise that complex geometries can be used to improve both the aesthetic and thermodynamic performance of passive building systems (Cupkova and Azel 2015) by actuating thermal performance through geometric parameters primarily due to convection. Currently, the engineering-oriented approach to the design of thermal mass relies on averaged thermal calculations (Holman 2002), which do not adequately describe the nuanced differences that can be produced by complex three-dimensional geometries of passive thermal mass systems. Using a combination of computational fluid dynamic simulations with physically measured data, we investigate the relationship of heat transfer coefficients related to parameters of surface geometry. Our measured results suggest that we can deliberately and significantly delay heat absorption re-radiation purely by changing the geometric surface pattern over the same thermal mass. The goal of this work is to offer designers a more robust rule set for understanding approximate thermal lag behaviors of complex geometric systems, with a focus on the design of geometric properties rather than complex thermal calculations.
keywords design methods; information processing; physics; smart materials
series ACADIA
email danacupkova@gmail.com
last changed 2017/10/17 09:12

_id caadria2017_113
id caadria2017_113
authors Huang, Weixin, Lin, Yuming and Wu, Mingbo
year 2017
title Spatial-Temporal Behavior Analysis Using Big Data Acquired by Wi-Fi Indoor Positioning System
source P. Janssen, P. Loh, A. Raonic, M. A. Schnabel (eds.), Protocols, Flows, and Glitches - Proceedings of the 22nd CAADRIA Conference, Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou, China, 5-8 April 2017, pp. 745-754
summary Understanding of people's spatial behavior is fundamental to architectural and urban design. However, traditional investigation methods applied in environmental behavior studies is highly limited regarding the amount of samples and regions it covers, which is not sufficient for the exploration of complex dynamic human behaviors and social activities in architectural space. Only recently the developments in indoor positioning system (IPS) and big data analysis technique have made it possible to conduct a full-time, full-coverage study on human environmental behavior. Among the variety IPS systems, the Wi-Fi IPS system is increasingly widely used because it is easy to be applied with acceptable cost. In this paper, we analyzed a 60-days anonymized data set, collected by a Wi-Fi IPS system with 110 Wi-Fi access points. The analysis revealed interesting patterns on people's behavior besides temporal spatial distribution, ranging from the cyclical fluctuation in human flow to behavioral patterns of sub-regions, some of which are not easy to be identified and interpreted by the traditional field observation. Through this case study, behavioral data from IPS system has exhibited great potential in bringing about profound changes in the study of environmental behavior.
keywords environmental behavior study; Wi-Fi; indoor positioning system; big data; spatial temporal behavior; ski resort
series CAADRIA
email huangwx@tsinghua.edu.cn
last changed 2017/05/09 08:05

_id acadia17_330
id acadia17_330
authors Krietemeyer, Bess; Bartosh, Amber; Covington, Lorne
year 2017
title Shared Realities: A Method for Adaptive Design Incorporating Real-Time User Feedback using Virtual Reality and 3D Depth-Sensing Systems
source ACADIA 2017: DISCIPLINES & DISRUPTION [Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-96506-1] Cambridge, MA 2-4 November, 2017), pp. 330- 339
summary When designing interactive architectural systems and environments, the ability to gather user feedback in real time provides valuable insight into how the system is received and ultimately performs. However, physically testing or simulating user behavior with an interactive system outside of the actual context of use can be challenging due to time constraints and assumptions that do not reflect accurate social, behavioral, or environmental conditions. Employing evidence based, user-centered design practices from the field of human–computer interaction (HCI) coupled with emerging architectural design methodologies creates new opportunities for achieving optimal system performance and design usability for interactive architectural systems. This paper presents a methodology for developing a mixed reality computational workflow combining 3D depth sensing and virtual reality (VR) to enable iterative user-centered design. Using an interactive museum installation as a case study, user pointcloud data is observed via VR at full scale and in real time for a new design feedback experience. Through this method, the designer is able to virtually position him/herself among the museum installation visitors in order to observe their actual behaviors in context and iteratively make modifications instantaneously. In essence, the designer and user effectively share the same prototypical design space in different realities. Experimental deployment and preliminary results of the shared reality workflow are presented to demonstrate the viability of the method for the museum installation case study and for future interactive architectural design applications. Contributions to computational design, technical challenges, and ethical considerations are discussed for future work.
keywords design methods; information processing; hci; VR; AR; mixed reality; computer vision
series ACADIA
email eakriete@syr.edu
last changed 2017/10/17 09:12

_id ecaade2017_057
id ecaade2017_057
authors Al-Qattan, Emad, Yan, Wei and Galanter, Philip
year 2017
title Tangible Computing for Establishing Generative Algorithms - A Case Study with Cellular Automata
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 347-354
summary The work presented in this paper investigates the potential of tangible interaction to setup algorithmic rules for creating computational models. The research proposes a workflow that allows designers to create complex geometric patterns through their physical interaction with design objects. The method aims to address the challenges of designers implementing algorithms for computational modeling. The experiments included in this work are prototype-based, which link a digital environment with an artifact - the physical representation of a digital model that is integrated with a Physical Computing System. The digital-physical workflow is tested through enabling users to physically setup the rules of a Cellular Automata algorithm. The experiments demonstrate the possibility of utilizing tangible interaction to setup the initial cell state and the rules of a CA algorithm to generate complex geometric patterns.
keywords Physical Computing; Tangible User-Interface; Cellular Automata
series eCAADe
email emadkkqattan@tamu.edu
last changed 2017/09/13 13:21

_id ecaade2017_061
id ecaade2017_061
authors Castellari, Dario and Erioli, Alessio
year 2017
title Hydroassemblies - Unit-based system for the symbiosis of urban spaces and greeneries through hydraulic driven tectonics
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 661-670
summary Hydroassemblies is a research thesis that investigates the architectural potential of a unit-based modular system that can recursively grow in space guided by hydrodynamic principles in order to generate intricate tectonic assemblies, integrating the roles of spatial articulator, water collector/distributor and plant cultivation substrate to foster a symbiotic relation with the urban environment. By implementing principles of circulatory systems in biology, the authors developed a system that grows through recursive formation of loops and articulates its tectonic via a continuous, interconnected branching network. The founding process improves upon a combinatorial algorithm of discrete parts, considering how iterative interactions at the local level have a feedback impact on the growth process at the whole system scale. The paper explores how features, spatial and perceptive qualities, affordances and opportunities emerge at the global scale of the formation from the interplay of local behavioral principles and environmental conditions. The provided implementation is a proof of concept of the production of complex qualities by means of massive quantities of simple elements and interactions.
keywords tectonics; combinatorics; unit-based system; branching network
series eCAADe
email dariocastellari@gmail.com
last changed 2017/09/13 13:21

_id cf2017_110
id cf2017_110
authors Koenig, Reinhard; Miao, Yufan; Knecht, Katja; Bus, Peter; Mei-Chih, Chang
year 2017
title Interactive Urban Synthesis: Computational Methods for Fast Prototyping of Urban Design Proposals
source Gülen Çagdas, Mine Özkar, Leman F. Gül and Ethem Gürer (Eds.) Future Trajectories of Computation in Design [17th International Conference, CAAD Futures 2017, Proceedings / ISBN 978-975-561-482-3] Istanbul, Turkey, July 12-14, 2017, p. 110.
summary In this paper, we present a method for generating fast conceptual urban design prototypes. We synthesize spatial configurations for street networks, parcels and building volumes. Therefore, we address the problem of implementing custom data structures for these configurations and how the generation process can be controlled and parameterized. We exemplify our method by the development of new components for Grasshopper/Rhino3D and their application in the scope of selected case studies. By means of these components, we show use case applications of the synthesis algorithms. In the conclusion, we reflect on the advantages of being able to generate fast urban design prototypes, but we also discuss the disadvantages of the concept and the usage of Grasshopper as a user interface.
keywords Procedural grammars, Artificial intelligence in design, Urban synthesis, Generative design, Grasshopper plugin, Cognitive design computing
series CAAD Futures
email reinhard.koenig@ait.ac.at, miao@arch.ethz.ch, katja.knecht@arch.ethz.ch, bus@arch.ethz.ch, chang@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2017/12/01 13:37

_id ecaade2017_059
id ecaade2017_059
authors Narangerel, Amartuvshin, Lee, Ji-Hyun and Stouffs, Rudi
year 2017
title Thermal and Daylighting Optimization of Complex 3D Faceted Façade for Office Building
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 209-218
summary Conventional façade design and its impact on building energy as well as indoor comfort is a well-researched topic in the architecture field. This paper examines the potential of a complex 3D shaped building envelope, elaborating on previous work by implementing energy simulation within the building façade optimization process. The multi-objective optimizations are conducted considering total thermal energy, electricity generation through BIPV, and daylighting in generic single person office rooms under meteorological data of Korea and Singapore. The performance of the non-dominants is analyzed and the results show an improvement in all objectives comparing with the preliminary study.
keywords Parametric facade design; muli-objective optimization; energy optimization; daylighting; form finding
series eCAADe
email amartuvshin@kaist.ac.kr
last changed 2017/09/13 13:21

_id ecaade2017_066
id ecaade2017_066
authors Panagoulia, Eleanna
year 2017
title The role of Open Data in identifying and evaluating the Livability of Urban Space - Importance and Method
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 495-504
summary The past decade has experienced a staggering rise of data-aided analysis that facilitate understanding the impact of socio-economic flux and socially oriented activities towards the quality and livability of space. Evaluating urban environments is not only important from the planners' perspective, but has larger implications for the residents themselves. In this paper we argue that the livability of a city or a neighborhood is not necessarily described by conventional, authoritative data, such as income, crime, education level etc., but the combination with ephemeral data layers, related to human perception and desire, can be more effective in capturing the dynamics of space. Implementing methods that are considered disassociated with urban analytics, we attempt to go beyond the conventions in understanding the dynamics that drive socio-economic phenomena and construct lived space. Our objective is to create methodologies of anticipating and evaluating urban environment by re-patterning different datasets and taking advantage of their combinatory potential.
keywords Livability; Data-aided Analysis; Open Data; Human Factor
series eCAADe
email eleannapan@gmail.com
last changed 2017/09/13 13:21

_id acadia17_492
id acadia17_492
authors Robeller, Christopher; Weinand, Yves
year 2017
title Realization of a Double-Layered Diamond Vault Made from CLT: Constraint-aware design for assembly, for the first integrally attached Timber Folded Plate lightweight structure, covering a column free span of 20 meters with only 45 millimeter thick CLT plates.
source ACADIA 2017: DISCIPLINES & DISRUPTION [Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-96506-1] Cambridge, MA 2-4 November, 2017), pp. 492- 501
summary The use of digital design and fabrication technology for the integration of joints into timber plate structures has been the subject of recent research in the field of architectural geometry. While most of research has been focused on joint geometries, assembly sequences, and the fabrication of smaller prototypes, there have been few implementations in buildings. This paper illustrates the challenges for such a process and offers our solutions for implementing it at a building scale through the example of a theater hall built from cross-laminated timber plates. The building achieves its column-free span of 20 meters with a plate thickness of only 45 mm through a form-active lightweight structure system. It combines prismatic and antiprismatic folded surfaces and a double-layered cross-section with integrated thermal insulation.
keywords material and construction; fabrication
series ACADIA
email christopher.robeller@epfl.ch
last changed 2017/10/17 09:13

_id ecaade2017_095
id ecaade2017_095
authors Trento, Armando, Woessner, Uwe, Kieferle, Joachim B. and Cataldo, Andrea
year 2017
title DSA - Digital Support for Art - Process and Tools to Realize a Large Sculpture in a Heritage Urban Environment
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 571-580
summary This paper reports on a research project oriented to support the communication for, and realization of a sculptural masterpiece within an urban context in the historic centre of Rome. The sculpture has been installed just a few months before the 2017 eCAADe, thus enabling conference participants to explore the final output in situ. While the whole process of creation of the art piece is outlined, our focus is on the description of implementing various technologies like laser scanning, Virtual Reality (VR) and Numerical Simulations that have been used to accomplish the relevant tasks. The general field of investigation is how digital tools and a VR approach to modelling, simulating and developing sculptural components of an artwork could facilitate the workflow between artist, client, designers, engineers, urbanists, archaeologists, art foundry fabricators and public authorities. Methodologically, an action research approach was adopted for this project, primarily for its ability to link between research and practice in order to solve a realistic multidisciplinary problem in its actual setting.
keywords Cross-disciplinary Collaboration; Virtual Reality; Integrated Design; CAVE; Digital Support for Art
series eCAADe
email armando.trento@uniroma1.it
last changed 2017/09/13 13:27

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