CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 41

_id e78b
authors Akin, O. and Akin, C.
year 1998
title On the process of creativity in puzzles, inventions, and designs
source Automation in Construction 7 (2-3) (1998) pp. 123-138
summary The most common means of identifying creativity has been through its products. In architecture, music, writing, art, even puzzle solving and scientific discovery, the prerequisite for considering creativity has been the presence of a creative product. Alternatively, anecdotal descriptions have been used to identify processes that are considered creative. Many scientific discoveries have been linked to a sudden realization or unexplainable revelation punctuated with the AHA! response. Outside of the creative product itself and the AHA! response, the kinds of concrete evidence that point to the process of creativity are precious few. Our purpose here is to further examine these phenomena and develop hypotheses about the nature of the creative process. Our ultimate aim is to develop a general theory of creativity. We intend to base this theory on a set of conditions that are necessary for the creative process to take place in a number of domains: puzzles, scientific discoveries, and design, with special emphasis on architectural design.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 4bf6
authors Akin, O. and Lin, C.
year 1995
title Design Protocol data and novel design decisions
source Design Studies, 16 (#2, April), 211-236
summary This work is a part of The Delft Protocols Workshop which is an international gathering of experts on design research. The objective is to study the behaviours of designers using techniques of cognitive psychology in general and protocol analysis in particular. The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between visual-graphic data processing and novel design ideas. Several analyses dealing with verbal-conceptual and visual-graphic data have been conducted; and the relationships between design activities and design decisions have been explored. The findings indicate that phases of the design process and the activities correlate with key design decisions.
series journal paper
email oa04@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ddss9802
id ddss9802
authors Akin, O., Aygen, Z., Cumming, M., Donia, M., Sen, R. and Zhang, Y.
year 1998
title Computational Specification of Building Requirements in theEarly Stages of Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary We have been exploring computational techniques to help building designers to specify design requirements during the early stages of design. In the past, little has been accomplished in this area either in terms of innovative computational technologies or the improvement of design performance.The prospect of improving design productivity and creating a seamless process between requirements specification and formal design are our primary motivations. This research has been conducted as partof a larger project entitled SEED (Software Environment to Support Early Phases in Building Design). SEED features an open-ended modular architecture, where each module provides support for a design activity that takes place in early design stages. Each module is supported by a database to store and retrieve information, as well as a user interface to support the interaction with designers. The module described in this paper, SEED-Pro (the architectural programming module of SEED), is a workingprototype for building design requirements specification. It can be used by other modules in SEED or by design systems in other domains, such as mechanical engineering, civil engineering, industrial designand electrical engineering. Our approach to SEED-Pro is divided into two phases: core, and support functionalities. The core functionalities operate in an interactive mode relying on a case-based approach to retrieve and adapt complex specification records to the problem at hand. The supportfunctionalities include the case-base, the data-base, and the standards processing environment for building specification tasks. Our findings indicate that SEED-Pro: (1) is a tool that structures the unstructured domain of design requirements; (2) enables the integration of design requirements with the rest of the design process, (3) leads to the creation of complex case-bases and (4) enables the observation of their performance in the context of real world design problems.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 1fb3
authors Akin, O., Cumming, M., Shealey, M. and Tuncer, B.
year 1997
title An electronic design assistance tool for case-based representation of designs
source Automation in Construction 6 (4) (1997) pp. 265-274
summary In precedent based design, solutions to problems are developed by drawing from an understanding of landmark designs. Many of the key design operations in this mode are similar to the functionalities present in case-based reasoning systems: case matching, case adapting, and case representation. It is clear that a rich case-base, encoding all major product types in a design domain would be the centerpiece of such an approach. EDAT (Electronic Design Assistance Tool) is intended to assist in precedent based design in the studio with the potential of expansion into the office setting. EDAT has been designed using object oriented system development methods. EDAT was used in a design studio at Carnegie Mellon University, during Spring 1996.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 4cda
authors Akin, O., Cumming, M. , Shealey, M. and Tuncer, B.
year 1996
title An Electronic Design Assistance Tool for Case Based Representation of Designs
source Design Computation: Collaboration, Reasoning, Pedagogy [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-05-5] Tucson (Arizona / USA) October 31 - November 2, 1996, pp. 123-132
summary In precedent based design, solutions to problems are developed by drawing from an understanding of landmark designs. Many of the key design operations in this mode are similar to the functionalities present in case based reasoning systems: case matching, case adapting, and case representation. It is clear that a rich case base, encoding all major product types in a design domain would be the centerpiece of such an approach. EDAT (Electronic Design Assistance Tool) is intended to assist in precedent based design in the studio with the potential of expansion into the office setting. EDAT has been designed using object oriented system development methods. EDAT was used in a design studio at Carnegie Mellon University, during Spring 1996, and will be used in future studios, as well.
series ACADIA
email oa04@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 0a09
authors Akin, O., Dave, B. and Pithavadian, S.
year 1987
title Problem Structuring in Architectural Design
source February, 1987. [4], 15 p. : ill. includes bibliography
summary The purpose of this research is to describe in operational terms the process of problem structuring while solving spatial problems in architectural design. The designer's behavior is described in terms of problem structuring, when problem parameters are established or transformed, and in terms of problem solving when these parameters are satisfied in a design solution. As opposed to problem solving, the structuring of problems is an under-studied but crucial aspect of complex tasks such as design. This work is based on observations derived from verbal protocol studies. To consider various levels of skill, the research subjects range from professional architects to novice designers. Subjects are given space planning problems which require them to develop solutions in accordance with individually established constraints and criteria, the majority of which are not explicit stated in the problem description. Based on the results of the protocol analysis, a framework is developed which explains how information processing characteristics, problem structure and different levels of expertise interact to influence the designer behavior
keywords architecture, design process, problem solving, protocol analysis, problem definition
series CADline
email oa04@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/05/17 08:09

_id d35f
authors Akin, O.
year 1997
title Researching Descriptive Models of Design
source Automation in Construction 7 (2-3) (1998) pp. 97-100
summary This special double issue is a result of the international symposium and workshop on „Descriptive Models of Design“ wich was held during July 1-5, 1996, at Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey. The primary goal of the symposium was to promote greater understanding and to develop recommendations for funding policy and practices in the area of descriptive models of design.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id ddss9401
id ddss9401
authors Akin, Omer
year 1994
title Psychology of Early Design in Architecture
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary Lately there has been a good deal of emphasis on the early stages of the design process, particularly by developers of computer aids and quantitative design models for both evaluation and generation of designs in a variety of domains. Yet, there is little understanding of the early design-process. While the early design process as manifested by human designers need not be the sole basis of the description of this phase, it certainly represents and important kernel of knowledge, especially for those who are interested in developing models, systems or merely interfaces for such systems. This paper focuses on the characterization of the psychology of the early design phase in architecture. It is described in terms of the general design strategies and problem solving tactics used; and is contrasted against some of the process characteristics that
series DDSS
email oaO4+@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 0107
authors Akin, Omer and Weinel, Eleanor F. (editors)
year 1982
title Representation and Architecture
source v, 285 p. : ill. Silver Spring, Maryland: Information Dynamics, Inc., 1982
summary A collection of papers developed from the proceeding of the Northeastern Regional meeting of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA), held at the Department of Architecture, Carnegie Mellon University. The introduction includes articles about representation, representation and architecture. Part 1, Who/To Whom speaks about representation and participatory design process, and of a system for recording behavior and occupying of design. Part 2, How: includes Figure, System and Memory, the Process of Design ; Representation and Creativity in Architecture and Miniature Substitutes. Part 3, With What :Information and Data Base in Design : the Computer as a Design Medium, Slides Talk and Translation
keywords design process, representation, architecture, creativity
series CADline
email oa04@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/05/17 08:09

_id 2387
authors Akin, Omer, Baykan, Can D. and Rao, Radha D.
year 1983
title Searching in the UNIX Directory
source December, 1983. 19 p. : ill., tables. includes bibliography
summary The structure of the directory space and subjects search behaviors in the UNIX operating system environment are examined. Protocol analysis with two subjects and survey of the contents of the directory space of all users of E-VAX and X-VAX systems in the Architecture and Computer Science Systems at Carnegie Mellon University were conducted. Depth first search characterized both the organization of the directories and the behavior of the subjects. Single step as opposed to multiple step traversal of the directory tree was also prevalent in the subject`s behaviors. Recommendations for system friendliness, in term of reusability, orientation, robustness, and consistency are developed
keywords UNIX, user interface, protocol analysis
series CADline
email oa04@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 409c
authors Akin, Omer, Flemming, Ulrich and Woodbury, Robert F.
year 1984
title Development of Computer Systems for Use in Architectural Education
source 1984. ii, 47 p. includes bibliography
summary Computers have not been used in education in a way that fosters intellectual development of alternate approaches to design. Sufficient theory exists to use computing devices to support other potentially fruitful approaches to design. A proposal is made for the development of a computer system for architectural education which is built upon a particular model for design, that of rational decision making. Within the framework provided by the model, a series of courseware development projects are proposed which together with hardware acquisitions constitute a comprehensive computer system for architectural education
keywords architecture, education, design, decision making
series CADline
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 6387
authors Akin, Omer
year 1978
title How do Architects Design?
source Artificial Intelligence and Pattern Recognition in Computer Aided Design. North-Holland Publishing Company, 1978. pp. 65-98. includes bibliography
summary This study is proposes a descriptive model of the design behavior of architects. In the first section a framework for the model is proposed. In the second section the framework is tested against empirical data. 11 information processing mechanisms are observed in the data. Eight of these: information acquisition, problem interpretation, problem representation, solution generation, solution integration, solution evaluation, perception and sketching, are used in developing design solutions. The three remaining mechanisms: design 'plans,' transformation rules and design-symbols, represent the categories of the priori knowledge used in design. In the third section these three knowledge mechanisms are explored in detail using the results of two additional experiments with designers
keywords design methods, architecture, design process
series CADline
email oa04@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/05/17 08:09

_id eb23
authors Akin, Omer
year 1981
title Efficient Computer-User Interface in Electronic Mail Systems
source Department of Computer Science, April, 1981. ii, 24 p. includes bibliography
summary This research explores the question of improving user- computer interface. The approach is one of observing and codifying various parameters that influence the efficiency of interface in the context of electronic mail tasks. In the paper the authors observe 'expert' and 'regular' users of a mail system and analyze the sources of efficiency. It is clear that experts use a different, more specialized, set of commands in performing standard mail tasks. While experts perform these tasks with fewer errors and more 'completely,' it is not clear that they achieve this any faster than regular users. Recommendations for design are made
keywords user interface, protocol analysis
series CADline
email oa04@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/05/17 08:09

_id ae05
authors Akin, Omer
year 1987
title Expertise of the Architect
source November, 1987. [13] p. unevenly numbered : ill. includes bibliography
summary One of the areas where the expertise of the seasoned architect comes out is in the initial structuring of design problems. During problem structuring the parameters and processes used in design are defined. Experienced architects modify these parameters both in global and local levels as a function of the success of their research process. Experienced architects also rely on 'scenarios' acquired through pervious experiences with similar problems to initialize their problem structures or to redefined them
keywords design, architecture, methods
series CADline
email oa04@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/05/17 08:09

_id 8a8a
authors Akin, Ö., Sen, R., Donia,M. and Zhang, Y.
year 1995
title SEED-Pro: Computer-Assisted Architectural Programming in SEED
source Journal of Architectural Engineering -- December 1995 -- Volume 1, Issue 4, pp. 153-161
summary Computer-assisted architectural programming is in its infancy. What there is in terms of architectural programming theory often differs from practice. In the first half of this paper we define relevant terms, provide abrief review of the state of the art, and draw attention to the primacy of architectural programming in design. SEED-Pro is introduced as an intelligent assistant providing structure to the normally open-endedactivities of design. This includes the creation of an architectural program from scratch. In the second, more technical, part of the paper we emphasize three specific topics. The design problem specificationfunctionality is described. The generation and evaluation of the emerging architectural program is discussed. An approach to the decomposition of the architectural program into alternative hierarchies is provided.The paper concludes with a discussion of what is and remains to be accomplished.
series journal paper
email oa04@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/05/15 19:27

_id ac12
id ac12
authors Akin, Ö.; R. Krishnamurti, K.P. Lam (eds)
year 2005
title Generative CAD Systems
source Singapore: Carnegie Mellon University, 2005
summary In the new millennium, Computer Aided Design has emerged as the most potent technological innovation in design. As BIM promises to integrate design tasks vertically and horizontally through graceful data exchange, new frontiers appear to researchers and practitioners as potential watershed events of the next decade. Generative approaches, a venerable engagement of computational design, is emerging as one of these. The proceedings of the Generative CAD Symposium held at Carnegie Mellon University, both summarizes the three decades of work in this area and reveals the beginnings of research and application expected in this domain. After all, will designers be able to effortlessly and intelligently generate potential design solutions that respond to appropriate design requirements and designers’ intentions?

series book
type normal paper
email oa04@andrew.cmu.edu
more http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/oa04/publications_books.html
last changed 2008/09/04 05:18

_id ddssar0202
id ddssar0202
authors Akin, Ömer and Özkaya, Ipek
year 2002
title Models of Design Requirement
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Case studies show that significant proportions of design errors and failures are linked to poor requirement specification during both early stages of design and as changes occur. Computational requirements engineering as a front-end to design iterations is a promising area addressing theseproblems. In other design disciplines, such as in software engineering, requirement engineering has given significant product improvements. In this paper, we present a state-space representation of requirement models for architectural design. The purpose of requirement modeling in design is tocreate a process by which requirements can be converted into working design solutions through frontend validation. We suggest three models of requirement specification, co-evolutionary [CoM], multiple domain [MDM] and single domain [SDM] models, that can facilitate this effort. Taken together all three models provide a full set of logical permutations of requirement-solution “worlds” and “operations.” We compare each model against the others in terms of facilitating change management and computability.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 2005_027
id 2005_027
authors Akin, Ömer and Özkaya, Ipek
year 2005
title Mixing Domains: Architecture plus Software Engineering
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 27-35
summary Software engineering is a multidisciplinary area of knowledge combining competence in computation with at least one other area of expertise, typically in the domain of the applications being created. A course offering for students of engineering, architecture and software engineering at Carnegie Mellon illustrates the challenges and opportunities of cross-domain instruction. These include ontology, problem taxonomies, and instruction strategies.
keywords Computing education in AEC; requirement engineering
series eCAADe
email iozka@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 450c
authors Akin, Ömer
year 1990
title Computational Design Instruction: Toward a Pedagogy
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 302-316
summary The computer offers enormous potential both in and out of the classroom that is realized only in limited ways through the applications available to us today. In the early days of the computer it was generally argued that it would replace the architect. When this idea became obsolete, the prevailing opinion of proponents and opponents alike shifted to the notion of the computer as merely adding to present design capabilities. This idea is so ingrained in our thinking that we still speak of "aiding" design with computers. It is clear to those who grasp the real potential of this still new technology - as in the case of many other major technological innovations - that it continues to change the way we design, rather than to merely augment or replace human designers. In the classroom the computer has the potential to radically change three fundamental ingredients: student, instruction, and instructor. It is obvious that changes of this kind spell out a commensurate change in design pedagogy. If the computer is going to be more than a passive instrument in the design studio, then design pedagogy will have to be changed, fundamentally. While the practice of computing in the studio continues to be a significant I aspect of architectural education, articulation of viable pedagogy for use in the design studio is truly rare. In this paper the question of pedagogy in the CAD studio will be considered first. Then one particular design studio taught during Fall 1988 at Carnegie Mellon University will be presented. Finally, we shall return to issues of change in the student, instruction, and instructor, as highlighted by this particular experience.
series CAAD Futures
email oa04@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id e807
authors Anadol, Z., and Akin, O.
year 1994
title Determining the impact of cad drafting tools on the building delivery process
source The Int. Journal of Construction IT 2(1), pp.1-8
summary Computer aided design is intended to change the way design and construction are carried out. at a minimum, this implies savings realized in terms of time spent and improvement of the quality of designs produced. to test this idea, we hypothesized that computer aided drafting and design operations may be instrumental in reducing the number of change orders issued and help control cost overruns by improving the accuracy of construction documents. we compared change orders in projects designed in the conventional media against ones developed with computers. we found that there is evidence supporting our hypothesis. furthermore, in the process of investigating this question, we found that computer applications to improve the management of existing building information (as-built drawings, building system related information, and the like) represent even more critical needs than those that can reduce change orders through more accurate design drawings.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

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