CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 144

_id acadia16_152
id acadia16_152
authors Ahlquist, Sean
year 2016
title Generative Robotics
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 152-153
series ACADIA
type introduction
email ahlquist@umich.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id acadia16_234
id acadia16_234
authors Ahlquist, Sean
year 2016
title Programmable Matter
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 234-235
series ACADIA
type introduction
email ahlquist@umich.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id acadia16_10
id acadia16_10
authors Ahlquist, Sean
year 2016
title Procedural Design
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 10-11
series ACADIA
type introduction
email ahlquist@umich.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id ddss2004_ra-19
id ddss2004_ra-19
authors Akamine, A. and A. Nélson Rodrigues da Silva
year 2004
title An Evaluation of Neural Spatial Interaction Models Based on a Practical Application
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) Recent Advances in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, ISBN: 1-4020-2408-8, p. 19-32
summary One of the serious problems faced by the Brazilian municipalities is the scarcity of resources for building education infrastructure. This asks for an optimal allocation of the available resources that includes, among other things, a rational spatial arrangement of the supply points (i.e., schools) in order to increase the demand coverage (i.e., students). If it is possible to foresee the regions where the demand is going to be concentrated, it is then possible to plan the location of new facilities and to assess the impact on the future level of service of the entire system. Considering that one of the consequences of the location-allocation process is the distribution of trips from demand points to supply points throughout the city, therefore affecting the overall intraurban accessibility conditions to essential services such as education, there is a strong need of models that planners can rely on to predict the future trip distribution patterns. As a result, the objective of this work was to evaluate the performance of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) when applied to spatial interaction models, the so-called Neural Spatial Interaction Models. This was done in a practical context, in contrast to the more theoretical works commonly found in literature. The practical application showed that the neural spatial interaction model had different performances when compared to the traditional gravity models. In one case the neural models outperformed the gravity models, while on the other case it was just the opposite. The explanation for this may be in the data or in the ANN model formulation, as discussed in the conclusions.
keywords Artificial Neural Networks, Spatial Interaction Models, Education Infrastructure
series DDSS
last changed 2004/07/03 20:13

_id ascaad2016_047
id ascaad2016_047
authors Algeciras-Rodríguez, José
year 2016
title Trained Architectonics
source Parametricism Vs. Materialism: Evolution of Digital Technologies for Development [8th ASCAAD Conference Proceedings ISBN 978-0-9955691-0-2] London (United Kingdom) 7-8 November 2016, pp. 461-468
summary The research presented here tests the capacity of artificial-neural-network (ANN) based multi-agent systems to be implemented in architectural design processes. Artificial Intelligence algorithms allow for a new approach to design, taking advantage of its generic functioning to produce meaningful outcomes. Experimentation within this project is based on Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) and takes advantage of its behavior in topology to produce architectural geometry. SOMs as full stochastic processes involve randomness, uncertainty and unpredictability as key features to deal with during the design process. Following this behavior, SOMs are used to transmit information, which, instead of being copied, is reproduced after a learning (training) process. Pre-existent architectural objects are taken as learning models as they have been considered masterpieces. In this context, by defining the SOM input set, masterpieces become measurement elements and can be used to set a distance to the new element position in a comparatistic space. The characteristics of masterpieces get embedded within the code and are transmitted to 3D objects. SOM produced objects from a population with shared characteristics where the masterpiece position is its probabilistic center point.
series ASCAAD
email josealgeciras@gmail.com
last changed 2017/05/25 11:33

_id acadia16_54
id acadia16_54
authors Andreen, David; Jenning, Petra; Napp, Nils; Petersen, Kirstin
year 2016
title Emergent Structures Assembled by Large Swarms of Simple Robots
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 54-61
summary Traditional architecture relies on construction processes that require careful planning and strictly defined outcomes at every stage; yet in nature, millions of relatively simple social insects collectively build large complex nests without any global coordination or blueprint. Here, we present a testbed designed to explore how emergent structures can be assembled using swarms of active robots manipulating passive building blocks in two dimensions. The robot swarm is based on the toy “bristlebot”; a simple vibrating motor mounted on top of bristles to propel the body forward. Since shape largely determines the details of physical interactions, the robot behavior is altered by carefully designing its geometry instead of uploading a digital program. Through this mechanical programming, we plan to investigate how to tune emergent structural properties such as the size and temporal stability of assemblies. Alongside a physical testbed with 200 robots, this work involves comprehensive simulation and analysis tools. This simple, reliable platform will help provide better insight on how to coordinate large swarms of robots to construct functional structures.
keywords emergent structures, mechanical intelligence, swarm robotics
series ACADIA
type paper
email david.andreen@arkitektur.lth.se
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id c7f4
authors Bancroft, Pamela J. (ed.)
year 1988
title Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings]
source ACADIA ‘88 Conference Proceedings /Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, 311 p.
summary Progress is being made towards integrating computing into architectural design. This progress is not being made in a coordinated and systematic manner, which is actually a positive factor. Architects will never be scientists or engineers, who hold the distinguishing characteristic of being masters of the scientific method. We have never been so incumbered, although we certainly have given it our best effort.

Architects are creative problem solvers, primarily driven by intuition, while coming from a sense of the past and the logic of the present. Our initial attempts at integrating computing into the studio, as evidenced by this collection of papers, is very diverse, based on differing pedagogical assumptions, and the achieving of significantly different results. This would appear to be evidence of a revolutionary approach to the problem rather than a scientific evolutionary approach. Terrific! This is when we as architects are at our best. Although we reach a great number of emphatically dead ends, the successes and discoveries achieved along the way are significant.

The diversity and quality of papers submitted suggest that we are indeed pursuing the task of integration in our typical, individual, intuitive, logical manner. I commend all of the authors who submitted proposals and thank them for expanding the envelope of integration into their personal exploration.

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/01/01 18:21

_id acadia16_432
id acadia16_432
authors Beaman, Michael Leighton
year 2016
title Landscapes After The Bifurcation of Nature: Models for Speculative Landformations
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 432-439
summary Landformations have not historically been the purview of design production or intervention. Whether it is the spatial extensions in which they emerge, the temporal extensions in which they operate, the complexities of their generative and sustaining processes, or a cultural and institutional deference to a notion of natural processes, designers as individuals or design as a discipline has not treated landformation as an area of design inquiry. But the inability to grasp nature fully has not stopped geological-scale manipulation by humans. In fact, anthropogenic activity is responsible for the re-formation of more of the Earth’s surface than all other agents combined. And yet as designers we often disregard this transformation as a design problem, precisely because it eludes the artifices of information visualization employed by designers. This paper examines ongoing research into the generation of speculative landformations through an analysis of underlying geological and anthropogenic processes as the quantitative basis for creating generative computational models (figure 1). The Speculative Landformations Project posits human geological-scale activity as a design problem by expanding the operability and agency of environmental design practice through hybrid human/digital computations.
keywords design decision-making, simulation and design optimization, responsive urban and landscape systems, big data
series ACADIA
type paper
email mbeaman@risd.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id acadia16_362
id acadia16_362
authors Beesley, Philip; Ilgun, Zeliha, Asya; Bouron, Giselle; Kadish, David; Prosser, Jordan; Gorbet, Rob; Kulic, Dana; Nicholas, Paul; Zwierzycki, Mateusz
year 2016
title Hybrid Sentient Canopy: An implementation and visualization of proprioreceptive curiosity-based machine learning
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 362-371
summary This paper describes the development of a sentient canopy that interacts with human visitors by using its own internal motivation. Modular curiosity-based machine learning behaviour is supported by a highly distributed system of microprocessor hardware integrated within interlinked cellular arrays of sound, light, kinetic actuators and proprioreceptive sensors in a resilient physical scaffolding system. The curiosity-based system involves exploration by employing an expert system composed of archives of information from preceding behaviours, calculating potential behaviours together with locations and applications, executing behaviour and comparing result to prediction. Prototype architectural structures entitled Sentient Canopy and Sentient Chamber developed during 2015 and 2016 were developed to support this interactive behaviour, integrating new communications protocols and firmware, and a hybrid proprioreceptive system that configured new electronics with sound, light, and motion sensing capable of internal machine sensing and externally- oriented sensing for human interaction. Proprioreception was implemented by producing custom electronics serving photoresistors, pitch-sensing microphones, and accelerometers for motion and position, coupled to sound, light and motion-based actuators and additional infrared sensors designed for sensing of human gestures. This configuration provided the machine system with the ability to calculate and detect real-time behaviour and to compare this to models of behaviour predicted within scripted routines. Testbeds located at the Living Architecture Systems Group/Philip Beesley Architect Inc. (LASG/PBAI, Waterloo/Toronto), Centre for Information Technology (CITA, Copenhagen) National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington DC are illustrated.
keywords intedisciplinary/collaborative design, intelligent environments, artificial intelligence, sensate systems
series ACADIA
type paper
email pbeesley@uwaterloo.ca
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id b83a
id b83a
authors Benoudjit A, Derix C and Coates P
year 2004
title Human perception and space classification: The Perceptive Network
source Proceedings of the Generative Arts conference, Milan, 2004
summary This paper presents a computer model for space perception, and space classification that is built around two artificial neural networks (ANN). This model is the first known application in architecture, where a self-organized map (SOM) is used to create a space classification map on the base of human perception criteria. This model is built with the aim to help both the space designers (architects, interior designer and urban designers), and the space users to gain a better understanding of the space in particular, and the environment where they evolve in general. This work is the continuity of an outgoing work started in the CECA by C. Derix around Kohonen network.
keywords neural network, self-organised feature map, perception, spatial configuration
series other
type normal paper
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2012/09/20 19:28

_id ecaade2007_012
id ecaade2007_012
authors Benoudjit, Moamed Amine; Coates, Paul S.
year 2007
title Artificial Networks for Spatial Analysis
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 911-918
summary The present paper aims to present a summary of my ongoing PhD research, which is concerned with the study of the possibilities of developing an analytical and design tool based on artificial neural networks (ANN) and other Artificial Intelligence (AI) and connectionist algorithms.
keywords Space, classification, artificial neural networks, cellular automata
series eCAADe
email compte_amine@hotmail.com, p.s.coates@uel.ac.uk
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id 8d41
authors Bourque, Paul N.
year 1988
title Computer-Aided Learning of Structural Behavior
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 135-146
summary Computer-aided learning of structural behavior can be very effective and motivating. Students are able to analyse structures in far less time than by traditional methods and address problems of much greater complexity. They do so without the burden of manual computation.

Computer programs exist that are well suited for this purpose, two of which are described. They offer a broad range of design capabilities, and are easy to master because of their intuitive and graphically oriented approach.

A number of examples are given to illustrate the potential of computer-aided learning as a complement to traditional methods either in the classroom or in coursework.

series ACADIA
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 0fc8
authors Boutros, N., Sehad, T. and Constans, A.
year 1998
title Aujourd'hui, entre l'agence et l'école, quelle utilisation des nouvelles technologies de l'information - Histoire d'une méthode
source Computerised Craftsmanship [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Paris (France) 24-26 September 1998, pp. 9-15
summary Nous proposons notre future méthodologie pédagogique de l'informatique fondée sur l'expérimentation d'un séminaire de 3ème cycle, aboutissement d'un enseignement qui commence dès la première année d'étude. Cette excursion comme dans un circuit organisé vous emmènera d'une agence d'architectes, aux cours d'informatique graphique de l'école d'architecture. Il y aura ensuite une pause « recherche » sur la méthodologie d'enseignement en exploitant de nombreux outils des nouvelles technologies de l'information - des expérimentations diverses ont eu lieu avec des équipes de recherche de la faculté polytechnique de Turin (Italie) et du centre d'études archéologiques d'Alexandrie (Egypte) - pour enfin arriver à notre destination, l'accès à l'information pour développer un projet architectural, une méthode pour une nouvelle génération.
series eCAADe
email Nader.Boutros@evcau.archi.fr, Tayeb.Sehad@evcau.archi.fr, Alain.Constans@evcau.archi.fr
more http://www.paris-valdemarne.archi.fr/archive/ecaade98/html/41boutros/index.htm
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id acadia16_164
id acadia16_164
authors Braumann, Johannes; Stumm, Sven; Brell-Cokcan, Sigrid
year 2016
title Towards New Robotic Design Tools: Using Collaborative Robots within the Creative Industry
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 164-173
summary This research documents our initial experiences of using a new type of collaborative, industrial robot in the area of architecture, design, and construction. The KUKA LBR-iiwa differs from common robotic configurations in that it uses seven axes with integrated force-torque sensors and can be programmed in the Java programming language. Its force-sensitivity makes it safe to interact with, but also enables entirely new applications that use hand-guiding and utilize the force-sensors to compensate for high tolerances on building sites, similar to how we manually approach assembly tasks. Especially for the creative industry, the Java programming opens up completely new applications that would have previously required complex bus systems or industrial data interfaces. We will present a series of realized projects that showcase some of the potential of this new type of collaborative, safe robot, and discuss the advantages and limitations of the robotic system.
keywords material tolerances, individualized production, iiwa, assembly, visual robot programming, collaborative robots
series ACADIA
type paper
email johannes@robotsinarchitecture.org
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id 8c6d
authors Brooks, H. Gordon
year 1988
title A New Communication Model for Architecture Using Video and 3D Computer Animated Graphics
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 263-274
summary The University of Arkansas School of Architecture has produced a half-hour television program describing Richard Meier's Atheneum in New Harmony, Indiana. The program uses an analysis technique developed by Dr. Geoffrey Baker, RIBA. The treatment for the material is a combination of on- site video and computer generated 3D animated graphics. An instrument was developed to evaluate the video and its 3D graphics. Based on analysis of the test data several conclusions are apparent. Students believe the video to be very helpful in understanding this building. This video appears to be paced too quickly for understanding in one viewing. Repetitive viewings of the video are helpful in understanding the content. Some students are able to understand principles presented visually better than those presented verbally, but best learning happens when information is reinforced visually and verbally.

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/01/01 18:35

_id a19d
authors Brown, G.Z. and Novitski, Barbara-Jo
year 1988
title A Macintosh Design Studio
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 151-162
summary During the past year at the University of Oregon, we have conducted an experimental design studio in which each student had an Apple Macintosh SE microcomputer on his or her studio desk. Each term we experimented with a variety of software, furniture arrangements, and pedagogical approaches to integrating computers in design teaching. Like most others who have conducted such experiments, we encountered problems in trying to use hardware and software which is fundamentally inappropriate for the intuitive, graphic, and creative processes characteristic of preliminary design. However, we solved many of these problems and have produced useful techniques that may form the beginnings of a new approach to the use of computers in architecture schools.

Our results fall in three major categories: 1) pedagogical discoveries about learning to design with a computer, which is greater than the sum of learning to design and learning about computers; 2) design exercises based on the Macintosh environment, exploiting the unique graphic qualities of the machine while simultaneously developing the ideas and drawing skills needed in the preliminary stages of design; 3) descriptions of the studio environment, including hardware, software, workstation layouts, security solutions, and other practical information that might be useful to others who are contemplating a similar project.

series ACADIA
email novitski@architectureweek.com
last changed 2003/05/15 19:17

_id acadia16_154
id acadia16_154
authors Brugnaro, Giulio; Baharlou, Ehsan; Vasey, Lauren; Menges, Achim
year 2016
title Robotic Softness: An Adaptive Robotic Fabrication Process for Woven Structures
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 154-163
summary This paper investigates the potential of behavioral construction strategies for architectural production through the design and robotic fabrication of three-dimensional woven structures inspired by the behavioral fabrication logic used by the weaverbird during the construction of its nest. Initial research development led to the design of an adaptive robotic fabrication framework composed of an online agent-based system, a custom weaving end-effector and a coordinated sensing strategy utilizing 3D scanning.The outcome of the behavioral weaving process could not be predetermined a priori in a digital model, but rather emerged out of the negotiation among design intentions, fabrication constraints, performance criteria, material behaviors and specific site conditions. The key components of the system and their role in the fabrication process are presented both theoretically and technically, while the project serves as a case study of a robotic production method envisioned as a soft system: a flexible and adaptable framework in which the moment of design unfolds simultaneously with fabrication, informed by a constant flow of sensory information.
keywords soft systems, agent-based systems, robotic fabrication, sensate systems
series ACADIA
type paper
email giuliobrugnaro@gmail.com
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id 20e8
id 20e8
authors Cavallin H, Martin W M, Heylighen A
year 2005
title THIS IS NOT A CAUCUS RACE. OR WHY UPGRADES IN GUIS WILL (NOT NECESSARILY) MAKE USERS (INSTANTLY) MORE PRODUCTIVE
source SID 2005, Proceedings of the 4th Social Intelligence Design Workshop, Stanford University, March 2005 (CD Rom)
summary In this paper we discuss the impact that upgrading applications may have across different users, using for this purpose the case of GUI improvements to a market leading drafting application. Our findings show that even though there are improvements in productivity that can be associated with the changes to the GUI, these improvements will not necessarily affect evenly all users, suggesting an interaction between the level of expertise and variations in productivity.
keywords software evaluation, problem solving, reliability, absolute benchmarking, commercial CAD software, upgrading
series other
type normal paper
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2005/04/01 11:24

_id 0a93
id 0a93
authors Cavallin H, Martin W M, Heylighen A
year 2005
title MIND-ING THE TASK
source SID 2005, Proceedings of the 4th Social Intelligence Design Workshop, Stanford University, March 2005 (CD Rom)
summary In this paper we describe our findings regarding the role of context in usability evaluation, particularly how the nature of the tasks can affect the users’ perception of the performance of a particular application. Our findings show a relationship between the variation in the nature of the tasks used for usability evaluation and the way in which subjects evaluate these applications afterwards using user -administered questionnaires. Our findings contradict the absolute benchmarking goal of some of these tools, and pose questions about the possibility of achieving that kind of benchmarks in software usability evaluation.
keywords software evaluation, problem solving, reliability, absolute benchmarking, commercial CAD software, upgrading
series other
type normal paper
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2005/04/01 11:23

_id acadia16_440
id acadia16_440
authors Clifford, Brandon
year 2016
title The McKnelly Megalith: A Method of Organic Modeling Feedback
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 440-449
summary Megalithic civilizations held tremendous knowledge surrounding the deceivingly simple task of moving heavy objects. Much of this knowledge has been lost to us from the past. This paper mines, extracts, and experiments with this knowledge to test what applications and resonance it holds with contemporary digital practice. As an experiment, a sixteen-foot tall megalith is designed, computed, and constructed to walk horizontally and stand vertically with little effort. Testing this prototype raises many questions about the relationship between form and physics. In addition, it projects practical application of such reciprocity between architectural desires and the computation of an object’s center of mass. This research contributes to ongoing efforts around the integration of physics-based solvers into the design process. It goes beyond the assumption of statics as a solution in order to ask questions about what potentials mass can contribute to the assembly and erecting of architectures to come. It engages a megalithic way of thinking which requires an intimate relationship between designer and center of mass. In doing so, it questions conventional disciplinary notions of stasis and efficiency.
keywords rapid prototyping, design simulation, fabrication, computation, megalith
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email brandon@matterdesignstudio.com
more admin
last changed 2016/10/24 12:18

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