CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id acadia16_78
id acadia16_78
authors Parker, Matthew; Taron, Joshua M.
year 2016
title Form-Making in SIFT Imaged Environments
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 78-87
summary Within the contemporary condition, turbulence that confronts architecture is no longer unpredictable weather patterns or wild beasts, but the unintended forces of a constantly connected digital infrastructure that demands constant attention. If, as Mark Wigley puts it, “architecture is always constructed in and against a storm” it is time for architecture to reevaluate its ability to separate us from a new storm-one that situates technology, global connectivity, human, non-human and composite users, and algorithmic architecture itself as new weather systems. Toward this end, this paper explores architecture’s ability to mediate and produce algorithmic turbulence generated through image-based sensing of the built environment. Through a close reading of Le Corbusier’s Urbanisme, we argue that for much of the 20th and the early part of the 21st century, cities have been designed to produce diagrams of smooth and homogenous flows. However, distributed personal technologies produce virtual layers that unevenly map onto the city, resulting in turbulent forces that computational platforms aim to conceal behind a visual narrative of accuracy, cohesion, anticipation, and order. By focusing on SIFT algorithms and their ability to extract n-dimensional vectors from two-dimensional images, this research explores computational workflows that mobilize turbulence towards the production of indeterminate form. These forms demarcate a new kind of challenge for both architecture and the city, whereby a cultural appetite to deploy algorithms that produce a smooth and seamless image of the world comes hand in hand with the turbulent and disruptive autonomy of those very same algorithms. By revisiting Urbanisme, a new set of architectural objectives are established that contextualize SIFTS within an urban agenda.
keywords complex morphology, sift algorithms, architectural representation, sensate systems
series ACADIA
type paper
email matthewparker@live.ca
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id acadia16_236
id acadia16_236
authors Pineda, Sergio; Arora, Mallika; Williams, P. Andrew; Kariuki, Benson M.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.
year 2016
title The Grammar of Crystallographic Expression
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 236-243
summary This paper stems from a research collaboration which brings together two disciplines at different ends of the scale spectrum: crystallography and architecture. The science of crystallography demonstrates that the properties of crystalline materials are a function of atomic/molecular interactions and arrangements at the atomic level—i.e., functions of the form and structure of the material. Some of these nano-geometries are frameworks with special characteristics, such as uni-directional porosity, multi-directional porosity, and varied combinations of flexibility and strength. This paper posits that the symmetry operations implicit in these materials can be regarded as a spatial grammar in the design of objects, spaces, and environments. The aim is to allow designers and architects to access the wealth of structural information that is now accumulated in crystallographic databases as well as the spatial symmetry logics utilized in crystallography to describe molecular arrangements. To enable this process, a bespoke software application has been developed as a tool-path to allow for interoperability between crystallographic datasets and CAD-based modelling systems. The application embeds the descriptive logic and generative principles of crystallographic symmetry. Using this software, the project, inter alia, produces results related to a class of geometrical surfaces called Triply Periodic Minimal (TPM) surfaces. In addition to digital iterations, a physical prototype of one such surface called the gyroid was constructed to test potential applications in design. The paper describes the development of these results and the conclusions derived from the first stage of user testing.
keywords interdisciplinarity, physical prototyping, triply periodic minimal surfaces, computational workflow, bespoke software, crystallographic space groups, nano-scale symmetry, nano-scale periodicity, molecular geometry, crystallographic expression
series ACADIA
type paper
email pinedas@cardiff.ac.uk
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id acadia16_402
id acadia16_402
authors Pinochet, Diego
year 2016
title Antithetical Colloquy: From operation to interaction in digital fabrication
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 402-411
summary This paper, introduces a cybernetic approach to digital design and fabrication by embracing aspects of embodied interaction, behavior and communication between designers and machines. To do so, it proposes the use of body gestures, digital/tangible interfaces and Artificial Intelligence to create a more reciprocal way of making. The goal is to present a model of designing and making as a ‘conversation’ instead a mere dialog from creator to executor of a predefined plan to represent an idea. In other words, this paper proposes a platform for interaction between two antithetical worlds—one binary/deterministic and the other perceptual/ambiguous—by focusing in the exploratory aspects of design and embracing aspects of improvisation, ambiguity, imprecision and discovery in the development of an idea.
keywords compuatational making, computational design, interactive fabrication, digital fabrication
series ACADIA
type paper
email diegopinochet@gmail.com
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id caadria2019_330
id caadria2019_330
authors Pokhrel, M. K., Anderson, T. N. and Lie, T. T.
year 2019
title Maintaining Thermal Comfort of a Single-Sided Naturally Ventilated Model House by Intelligently Actuating Windows
source M. Haeusler, M. A. Schnabel, T. Fukuda (eds.), Intelligent & Informed - Proceedings of the 24th CAADRIA Conference - Volume 1, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand, 15-18 April 2019, pp. 705-714
summary In New Zealand's (NZ) mild climatic conditions, most residential houses are ventilated naturally, mainly by opening windows. However, maintaining the indoor thermal comfort characteristics of a house by modulating natural ventilation is particularly challenging, as the solution is not explicit. Determining a solution requires a technique that adjusts openable window area while encapsulating the complexity, dynamics, and nonlinearity associated with the natural ventilation driving forces and building thermal behavior. By verifying that there exists a significant potential of regulating indoor thermal comfort of a relatively airtight and insulated house by adjusting window openable area; this work additionally confirmed an excellent capability of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technique in predicting air temperature time-series of the naturally ventilated house. On the basis of these examinations, this work particularly developed a co-simulation strategy between building thermal-airflow model and the ANN model and demonstrated that windows could be regulated intelligently to modulate the natural ventilation and maintain indoor thermal comfort level during the summer period by applying Artificial Neural Network (ANN) based predictive controller technique.
keywords Natural Ventilation; Thermal Comfort ; Artificial Neural Network (ANN) ; Residential House ; Intelligent Windows
series CAADRIA
email manoj.pokhrel@aut.ac.nz
last changed 2019/04/16 08:22

_id 2d82
authors Radford, Anthony D., Oxman, Robert and Oxman, Rivka
year 1988
title Design Teaching: The Language of Architectural Plans
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 99-110
summary The aims, operation and student reaction to a design studio course for beginning architecture students on the syntax of architectural plans are described. The course is highly structured and draws from computer graphics templates and a teaching manual which set up a series of exercises. The process of learning comes from execution of the exercises and from associated reading, discussion and debate on architectural planning issues.

series ACADIA
email arrro01@techunix.technion.ac.il
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id acadia16_244
id acadia16_244
authors Ramirez-Figueroa, Carolina; Hernan, Luis; Guyet, Aurelie; Dade-Robertson, Martyn
year 2016
title Bacterial Hygromorphs: Experiments into the Integration of Soft Technologies into Building Skins
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 244-253
summary The last few years have seen an increase in the interest to bring living systems into the process of design. Work with living systems, nonetheless, presents several challenges. Aspects such as access to specialists’ labs, samples of living systems, and knowledge to conduct experiments in controlled settings become barriers which prevent designers from developing a direct, material engagement with the material. In this paper, we propose a design methodology which combines development of experiments in laboratory settings with the use of what we call material proxies, which refer to materials that operate in analogue to some of the behaviors observed in the target organism. We will propose that combining material proxies with basic scientific experimentation constitutes a form of direct material engagement, which encourages richer exploration of the design domain. We will develop this argument by reporting on our experience in designing and delivering the primer component of a themed design studio, structured around bacterial spores as hygroscopic components of building facades. The six-week design project asked students to consider the behavior of bacterial spores, and to imagine a number of systems in which they could be employed as actuators of a membrane system that responded to fluctuations in humidity. The module is interesting in that it negotiates some of the challenges often faced by designers who want to develop a material engagement with living systems, and to produce informed speculations about their potential in architectural design.
keywords actuators, architecture, building skins, artifical muscles, hygromorphs, bacterial spores
series ACADIA
type paper
email p.c.ramirez-figueroa@newcastle.ac.uk
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id sigradi2004_329
id sigradi2004_329
authors Ravi S. Srinivasan; Ali M. Malkawi
year 2004
title The use of learning algorithms for real-time immersive data visualization in buildings
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations are used to predict indoor thermal environments and assess their response to specific internal/external conditions. Although computing power has increased exponentially in the past decade, CFD simulations are time consuming and their prediction results cannot be used for real-time immersive visualization in buildings. A method that can bypass the time consuming simulations and generate .acceptable. results will allow such visualization to be constructed. This paper discusses a project that utilizes Artificial Neural Network (ANN) as a learning algorithm to predict post-processed CFD data to ensure rapid data visualization. The technique has been integrated with an immersive Augmented Reality (AR) system to visualize CFD results in buildings. ANN was also evaluated against a linear regression model. Both models were tested and validated with datasets to determine their degree of accuracy. Initial tests, conducted to evaluate the user.s experience of the system, indicated satisfactory results.
series SIGRADI
email sravi.malkawi@design.upenn.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:58

_id 0e5d
authors Reed, Raymond D.
year 1988
title The Teaching of Computer Assisted Sustainable Architectural Design
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 111-122
summary Sustainable architecture is high-tech, energy and resource conserving architecture that sustains and increases the human and natural carrying capacity of the host environment. This paper presents a computer assisted design process to teach sustainable architectural design.

The energy performance of a base case building in each of four climates and cultures is presented. The climates are: Phoenix (hotdry), Minneapolis (cold-dry), Boston (cold-humid), and New Orleans ( hot- humid). Keeping the host climate, site, building size and function constant: but varying materials, shape and design concepts, each base case is iterated through a series of computer assisted re-designs to transform each base case building into an architecture representative of its regional climate and culture.

Traditional technologies and concepts produce traditional regional architecture. New technologies and concepts produce forms expressive of an emerging high-tech, high-touch, low energy society.

The paper presents computer generated work by the author and his students. It also presents an interim evaluation of the successes and difficulties of conducting a 'paper free' design studio.

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/01/01 18:27

_id acadia16_332
id acadia16_332
authors Retsin, Gilles; Garcia, Manuel Jimenez
year 2016
title Discrete Computational Methods for Robotic Additive Manufacturing: Combinatorial Toolpaths
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 332-341
summary The research presented in this paper is part of a larger, emerging body of research into large-scale 3D printing. The research attempts to develop a computational design method specifically for large-scale 3D printing of architecture. Influenced by the concept of Digital Materials, this research is situated within a critical discussion of what fundamentally constitutes a digital object and process. This requires a holistic understanding, taking into account both computational design and fabrication. The intrinsic constraints of the fabrication process are used as opportunities and generative drivers in the design process. The paper argues that a design method specifically for 3D printing should revolve around the question of how to organize toolpaths for the continuous addition or layering of material. Two case-study projects advance discrete methods as efficient ways to compute a continuous printing process. In contrast to continuous models, discrete models allow users to serialize problems and errors in toolpaths. This allows a local optimization of the structure, avoiding the use of global, computationally expensive, problem-solving algorithms. Both projects make use of a voxel-based approach, where a design is generated directly from the combination of thousands of serialized toolpath fragments. The understanding that serially repeated elements can be assembled into highly complex and heterogeneous structures has implications stretching beyond 3D printing. This combinatorial approach for example also becomes highly valuable for construction systems based on modularity and prefabrication.
keywords prgrammable materials, simulation and design optimization, digital fabrication, big data
series ACADIA
type paper
email jg.manuel@gmail.com
last changed 2016/11/17 09:20

_id ecaade2007_044
id ecaade2007_044
authors Richter, Katharina; Heylighen, Ann; Donath, Dirk
year 2007
title Looking Back to the Future
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 285-292
summary In the early and mid 1990s the idea to apply CBR to the task of designing — in short Case-Based Design (CBD) — led to a considerable number of research initiatives across the world. Several promising CBD tools and prototypes were developed and enthusiastically celebrated within the research community, seemingly announcing a promising future for CAAD. However, because the predicted breakthrough failed to appear, an in-depth evaluation of six CBD tools was conducted in 2001 in search of reasons for this limited success. At first sight the situation has not changed much since then, yet a closer look reveals CBD research still to be quite active, be it sometimes disguised. This observation, combined with our belief in CBD’s potential for aiding professional and student architects, motivated an expanded issue of the 2001 study. This issue determines the position of current CBD research within the CAAD domain and uncovers focal points set by CBD researchers and the tools they created. Additionally it analyses the role of emerging technologies in overcoming earlier identified drawbacks of CBD tools in architecture.
keywords Case-based design, architectural design, design support systems
series eCAADe
email katharina.richter@archit.uni-weimar.de, ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.be, donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id 8e77
authors Rubinger, Morton
year 1988
title Drawing Lessons from Word Processing
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 235-245
summary Word processing is universally successful as a computer application whereas computer-aided design is not. What can we learn from word processing? It tells us that, to be successful, an entry-level CAD system should be basic and focus mainly on drawing and manipulation of drawings rather than on sophisticated operations and automation, it should be simple, easy to use and moderate in cost. In architectural education, it should be used in the early stages of design to enhance design quality and design learning. To do this, we need to understand the characteristics of this new drawing and design medium. Software needs to be thoroughly learned in advance of studio use, and computer-based studio projects should take a computational view of design to enhance the effective use of computers in learning to design.

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/01/01 18:34

_id acadia16_62
id acadia16_62
authors Rusenova, Gergana; Dierichs, Karola; Baharlou, Ehsan; Menges, Achim
year 2016
title Feedback- and Data-driven Design for Aggregate Architectures: Analyses of Data Collections for Physical and Numerical Prototypes of Designed Granular Materials
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp.62-72
summary This project contributes to the investigations in the field of aggregate architectures by linking two research areas: the numerical simulation of aggregate formations, and a concept for an online-controlled pneumatic formwork system. This paper introduces a novel approach for constructing with designed particles based on a feedback process. The overall aim was to investigate the capacity of aggregates as an architectural material system, which create emergent spatial formations. Initially the particles´ micro-mechanical behavior and the fragile stability of the formations were analyzed using numerical simulations. Based on this, an online-controlled inflatable formwork system was developed. The formwork was designed to react to the actual stability state of an aggregate formation; for this, a statistical set of simulation data was gathered, which directly informed the physical system. This overall concept was proven and verified in a one-to-one scaled physical model. The methods developed within this research provide a first set of baselines for comparison between the behavior of simulated and physical designed granular materials.
keywords simulations, designed particles, feedback-driven design, embedded responsiveness
series ACADIA
type paper
email rusenova.g@gmail.com
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id acadia16_44
id acadia16_44
authors Sanchez, Jose
year 2016
title Combinatorial design: Non-parametric computational design strategies
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 44-53
summary This paper outlines a framework and conceptualization of combinatorial design. Combinatorial design is a term coined to describe non-parametric design strategies that focus on the permutation, combination and patterning of discrete units. These design strategies differ substantially from parametric design strategies as they do not operate under continuous numerical evaluations, intervals or ratios but rather finite discrete sets. The conceptualization of this term and the differences with other design strategies are portrayed by the work done in the last 3 years of research at University of Southern California under the Polyomino agenda. The work, conducted together with students, has studied the use of discrete sets and combinatorial strategies within virtual reality environments to allow for an enhanced decision making process, one in which human intuition is coupled to algorithmic intelligence. The work of the research unit has been sponsored and tested by the company Stratays for ongoing research on crowd-sourced design.
keywords non-parametric computational design strategies, permutations, combinatorics, building systems, game design, crowdsourcing, computation
series ACADIA
type paper
email jomasan@gmail.com
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id acadia16_24
id acadia16_24
authors Savov, Anton; Buckton, Ben; Tessmann, Oliver
year 2016
title 20,000 Blocks: Can gameplay be used to guide non-expert groups in creating architecture?
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 24-33
summary The paper follows research in engaging groups of non-trained individuals in the creation of architectural designs using games and crowdsourcing for human-directed problem-solving. With the proposed method, architectural experts can encode their design knowledge into custom-developed multiplayer gameplay in Minecraft. Non-expert players then are constrained by this gameplay which guides them to create unique architectural results. We describe a method with three components: guiding rules, verification routines and fast feedback. The method employs a real-time link between the game and structural analysis in Grasshopper to verify the designs. To prove the viability of these results, we use robotic fabrication, where the digital results are brought to reality at scale. A major finding of the work is the suite of tools for calibrating the balance of influence on the resulting designs between the Experts and the Players. We believe that this process can create designs which are not limited to parametrically optimal solutions but could also solve real-world problems in new and unexpected ways.
keywords robot-human collaboration, digital fabrication, gaming in design, big data
series ACADIA
type paper
email savov@dg.tu-darmstadt.de
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id ecaade2012_28
id ecaade2012_28
authors Schaeverbeke, Robin; Heylighen, Ann
year 2012
title In Search of the ‘In Between’
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 49-57
summary Our paper presents a teaching project in the context of architectural education which inquires the fusion of learning processes within both physical and digital media. Our approach, situated within an undergraduate program, aims to blur the boundaries between physical and digital activities in order to enhance and amplify their qualities and, by doing so, broadening students’ understanding and awareness of extending design-based media. The program relies upon an open, design-driven, game-inspired process. While the games allow to explore form and space by following a set of simple directions, the games’ constraints guide the teaching of specifi c drawing and representation techniques. The exercises span two semesters of the fi rst year curriculum. Within the exercises we re-approach the embodiment of skill based upon possibilities, paths and strategies to combine design-based media as a conglomerate to draw from rather than as a set of singular techniques
wos WOS:000330320600004
keywords Architectural-education; design thinking; hybrid drawing; tooling; games
series eCAADe
email robin.schaeverbeke@architectuur.sintlucas.wenk.be
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id acadia16_260
id acadia16_260
authors Schleicher, Simon; La Magna, Riccardo
year 2016
title Bending-Active Plates: Form-Finding and Form-Conversion
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 260-269
summary With this paper, the authors aim to contribute to the discourse on bending-active structures by highlighting two different design methods, form-finding and form-conversion. The authors compare the two methods through close analysis of bending-active plate structures, discussing their advantages and disadvantages based on three built case studies. This paper introduces the core ideas behind bending-active structures, a rather new structural system that makes targeted use of large elastic deformations to generate and stabilize complex geometrical forms based on initially planar elements. Previous research has focused mainly on form-finding. As a bottom-up approach, it begins with flat plates and recreates the bending and coupling process digitally to gradually determine the final shape. Form-conversion, conversely, begins with a predefined shape that is then discretized by strategic surface tiling and informed mesh subdivision, and which in turn considers the geometrical and structural constraints given by the plates. The three built case studies exemplify how these methods integrate into the design process. The first case study applies physical and digital form-finding techniques to build a chaise lounge. The latter two convert a desired shape into wide-spanning constructions that either weave multiple strips together or connect distant layers with each other, providing additional rigidity. The presented case studies successfully prove the effectiveness of form-finding and form-conversion methods and render a newly emerging design space for the planning, fabrication, and construction of bending-active structures.
keywords bending-active structures, form-conversion, form-finding, embedded responsiveness
series ACADIA
type paper
email simon_s@berkeley.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id acadia16_214
id acadia16_214
authors Schwartz, Mathew
year 2016
title Use of a Low-Cost Humanoid for Tiling as a Study in On-Site Fabrication: Techniques and Methods
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 214-223
summary Since the time architecture and construction began embracing robotics, the pre-fab movement has grown rapidly. As the possibilities for new design and fabrication emerge from creativity and need, the application and use of new robotic technologies becomes vital. This movement has been largely focused on the deployment of industrial-type robots used in the (automobile) manufacturing industry for decades, as well as trying to apply these technologies into off-site building construction. Beyond the pre-fab (off-site) conditions, on-site fabrication offers a valuable next step to implement new construction methods and reduce human work-related injuries. The main challenge in introducing on-site robotic fabrication/construction is the difficulty in calibrating robot navigation (localization) in an unstructured and constantly changing environment. Additionally, advances in robotic technology, similar to the revolution of at-home 3D printing, shift the ownership of modes of production from large industrial entities to individuals, allowing for greater levels of design and construction customization. This paper demonstrates a low-cost humanoid robot as highly customizable technology for floor tiling. A novel end-effector design to pick up tiles was developed, along with a localization system that can be applied to a wide variety of robots.
keywords humanoid robot, digital fabricaiton, sensate systems
series ACADIA
type paper
email umcadop@gmail.com
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id acadia16_224
id acadia16_224
authors Schwinn, Tobias; Krieg, Oliver David; Menges, Achim
year 2016
title Robotic Sewing: A Textile Approach Towards the Computational Design and Fabrication of Lightweight Timber Shells
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 224-233
summary Unlike any other building material, timber has seen numerous innovations in design, manufacturing, and assembly processes in recent years. Currently available technology not only allows architects to freely shape building elements but also to define their micro- or macroscopic material make-up and therefore the material itself. At the same time, timber shells have become a focus of research in wood architecture by rethinking both construction typologies and material application. Their main advantage, however, also poses a challenge to its construction: As the shell is both the load-bearing structure as well as enclosure, its segmentation and the individual segment’s connections become increasingly important. Their complex and often differentiated geometries do not allow for standardized timber joints, and with decreasing material thickness, conventional connection techniques become less feasible. The research presented in this paper investigates textile strategies for the fabrication of ultra-lightweight timber shells in architecture. Specifically, a robotic sewing method is developed in conjunction with a computational design method for the development of a new construction system that was evaluated through a large-scale prototype building.
keywords textile connection, robotic fabrication, timber construction, embedded responsiveness
series ACADIA
type paper
email oliver.krieg@icd.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id c84f
authors Seebohm, Thomas
year 1988
title Interpreting Takefijmi Aida's Toy Block Houses
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 175-185
summary Three-dimensional modeling projects interpreting Takefumi Aida's Toy block Houses form the basis of a first course in architectural computer graphics described in this paper. Takefumi Aida's houses were chosen for two recent offerings of the course because they form a consistent body of architectural work which is very sculptural, geometrically structured and based on a single vocabulary of shapes. Shaded images produced in the course show the importance of human skill and judgement in computer modeling and rendering. The paper demonstrates the subjective nature of computer interpretations.

series ACADIA
email tseebohm@fes.uwaterloo.ca
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id acadia16_254
id acadia16_254
authors Sharmin, Shahida; Ahlquist, Sean
year 2016
title Knit Architecture: Exploration of Hybrid Textile Composites Through the Activation of Integrated Material Behavior
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 254-259
summary The hybrid system in textile composites refers to the structural logic defined by Heino Engel, which describes a system that integrates multiple structural behaviors to achieve an equilibrium state (Engel 2007). This research explores a material system that can demonstrate a hybrid material behavior defined by the differentiated tensile and bending-active forces in a single, seamless knitted composite material. These behaviors were installed during the materialization phase and activated during the composite formation process. Here, the material formation involves two interdependent processes: 1) development of the knitted textile with integrated tensile and reinforced materials and 2) development of the composite by applying pre-stress and vacuuming the localized area with reinforcements in a consistent resin-based matrix. The flat bed industrial weft knitting machine has been utilized to develop the knitted textile component of the system with a controlled knit structure. This enables us to control the material types, densities, and cross sections with integrated multiple layers/ribs and thus, the performance of the textile at the scale of fiber structure. Both of these aspects were researched in parallel, using physical and computational methods informed and shaped by the potentials and constraints of each other. A series of studies has been utilized to develop small-scale prototypes that depict the potential of the hybrid textile composite as the generator of complex form and bending active structures. Ultimately, it indicates the possibilities of hybrid textile composite materials as self-structuring lightweight components that can perform as highly articulated and differentiated seamless architectural elements that are capable of transforming the perception of light, space, and touch.
keywords form-finding, programmable materials, composite forming processes, embedded responsiveness
series ACADIA
type paper
email shahida@umich.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

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