CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 41 to 60 of 144

_id ab99
authors Hendricx, Ann and Heylighen, Ann
year 1997
title From Literacy to Creativity in CAAD
source AVOCAAD First International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-01-09] Brussels (Belgium) 10-12 April 1997, pp. 213-226
summary The course on CAAD at the K.U. Leuven is part of the course on design methodology and theory from which it is the most recent and natural extension. Attached to this course a series of assignments has been developed which bring the students in 45 hours to a non-trivial level of acquaintance with CAAD. Rather then mimic the traditional pencil- and paper approach, the exercises encourage students to explore additional design opportunities that a drawing board cannot offer. In this way, the practical part goes beyond a mere preparation for practice. The assignments are built on top of AutoCAD to which we have added in-house developments in order to focus on specific educational goals within a very limited time. The paper presents and comments these assignments and shows results from the last 2 years.
series AVOCAAD
email Ann.Hendricx@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ba93
authors Hendricx, Ann and Neuckermans, Herman
year 1999
title About Objects and Approaches - A Conceptual View on Building Models
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 133-148
summary Considering integrated CAAD environments for architectural design, a number of different approaches are possible. This paper presents the policy of the CADLAB at the KU Leuven University, where design support right from the first design phases is a basic consideration. After a short introduction on the theoretical framework and additional design tests, we will discuss the core object model that forms the cornerstone for the contemplated design environment. This object model describes all possible data, concepts and operations connected with the architectural design process. For its development, we used the object-oriented analysis method MERODE. The starting-points and main aspects of the model will be discussed, illustrated with examples of implemented prototypes. The architect's point of view and the specific nature of the architectural design process were always kept in mind, thus leading to a model that hopes to make a valuable contribution to the research area of integrated design environments.
keywords CAAD, Integrated Design Environment, Building Models, Conceptual Modelling, MERODE
series CAAD Futures
email Herman.Neuckermans@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id ddssar0012
id ddssar0012
authors Hendricx, Ann and Neuckermans, Herman
year 2000
title Setting objects to work: adding functionality to an architectural object model
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary Several research initiatives in the field of product modelling have produced static descriptions of the architectural and geometrical objects capable of describing architectural design projects. Less attention is paid to the development phase in which these static models are transformed into workable architectural design environments. In the context of the IDEA+ research project (Integrated Design Environment for Architectural Design), we use the object-oriented analysis method MERODE to develop and describe both an enterprise (or product) model and a functionality model. On the one hand, the enterprise model defines the architectural and geometrical objects, their methods and their relation with other objects. On the other hand, the functionality model organizes the functionality objects – ranging from single-event objects to complex-workflow objects – in a layered and easily expandable system. The functionality model is created on top of the enterprise model and closes the gap between the static enterprise model and the dynamic design environment as a whole. After a short introduction of the envisaged design environment and its underlying enterprise model, the paper will concentrate on the presentation of the higher-level functionality model. Elaborated examples of functionality objects on the different levels will clarify its concepts and proof its feasibility.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 9f48
authors Hendricx, Ann and Neuckermans, Herman
year 2000
title Towards a Working Design Environment: From Enterprise to Functionality Model
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 197-199
summary Several product-modelling initiatives have produced static descriptions of the architectural and geometrical objects capable of describing architectural design projects. Less attention is paid to the development phase in which these static models are transformed into workable architectural design environments. In the context of the IDEA+ research project (Integrated Design Environment for Architectural Design) emphasis lies on the systematic development of both phases. The result is an analysis model that consists of two submodels. On the one hand, the enterprise model defines the architectural and geometrical objects, their methods and their relation with other objects. On the other hand, the functionality model organises the functionality objects - ranging from single-event objects to complex-workflow objects - in a layered and easily expandable system. As such, it closes the gap between the static enterprise model and the dynamic design environment as a whole.
series SIGRADI
email ann.hendricx@asro.kuleuven.ac.be, herman.neuckermans@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id dfe6
authors Hendricx, Ann and Neuckermans, Herman
year 2001
title The Use of Design Cases to Test Architectural Building Models
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 73-78
summary The IDEA+ project aims at developing an Integrated Design Environment for Architect designers, in which design tools and computational tests make use of one and the same core building description. Such a description must be apt to describe architecture in a full-fledged way. Hereto, the authors have put the IDEA+ model to the test with actual design cases. These cases have been used to test isolated design concepts and to mimic the global design process.
keywords Building Model, CAAD, Case, Object-Oriented, Architecture, Architectural Model
series eCAADe
email herman.neuckermans@asro.kuleuven.ac.be, ann.hendricx@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id cf2011_p027
id cf2011_p027
authors Herssens, Jasmien; Heylighen Ann
year 2011
title A Framework of Haptic Design Parameters for Architects: Sensory Paradox Between Content and Representation
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 685-700.
summary Architects—like other designers—tend to think, know and work in a visual way. In design research, this way of knowing and working is highly valued as paramount to design expertise (Cross 1982, 2006). In case of architecture, however, it is not only a particular strength, but may as well be regarded as a serious weakness. The absence of non-visual features in traditional architectural spatial representations indicates how these are disregarded as important elements in conceiving space (Dischinger 2006). This bias towards vision, and the suppression of other senses—in the way architecture is conceived, taught and critiqued—results in a disappearance of sensory qualities (Pallasmaa 2005). Nevertheless, if architects design with more attention to non visual senses, they are able to contribute to more inclusive environments. Indeed if an environment offers a range of sensory triggers, people with different sensory capacities are able to navigate and enjoy it. Rather than implementing as many sensory triggers as possible, the intention is to make buildings and spaces accessible and enjoyable for more people, in line with the objective of inclusive design (Clarkson et al. 2007), also called Design for All or Universal Design (Ostroff 2001). Within this overall objective, the aim of our study is to develop haptic design parameters that support architects during design in paying more attention to the role of haptics, i.e. the sense of touch, in the built environment by informing them about the haptic implications of their design decisions. In the context of our study, haptic design parameters are defined as variables that can be decided upon by designers throughout the design process, and the value of which determines the haptic characteristics of the resulting design. These characteristics are based on the expertise of people who are congenitally blind, as they are more attentive to non visual information, and of professional caregivers working with them. The parameters do not intend to be prescriptive, nor to impose a particular method. Instead they seek to facilitate a more inclusive design attitude by informing designers and helping them to think differently. As the insights from the empirical studies with people born blind and caregivers have been reported elsewhere (Authors 2010), this paper starts by outlining the haptic design parameters resulting from them. Following the classification of haptics into active, dynamic and passive touch, the built environment unfolds into surfaces that can act as “movement”, “guiding” and/or “rest” plane. Furthermore design techniques are suggested to check the haptic qualities during the design process. Subsequently, the paper reports on a focus group interview/workshop with professional architects to assess the usability of the haptic design parameters for design practice. The architects were then asked to try out the parameters in the context of a concrete design project. The reactions suggest that the participating architects immediately picked up the underlying idea of the parameters, and recognized their relevance in relation to the design project at stake, but that their representation confronts us with a sensory paradox: although the parameters question the impact of the visual in architectural design, they are meant to be used by designers, who are used to think, know and work in a visual way.
keywords blindness, design parameters, haptics, inclusive design, vision
series CAAD Futures
email jherssens@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id heylighen__arcc2003
id Heylighen _ARCC2003
authors Heylighen , Ann and Seger, Nicole
year 2002
title An architectural Shift+F7 - Supporting concept development through design cases
source Lucie Fontein (ed) ARCC/EAAE Conference on Architectural Research Proceedings, School of Architecture, McGill University, Montreal (Canada), May 22-25, 2002, 10 p. (CD Rom)
summary This paper describes the linking of Idea Space/E3dAD, a system that captures and interprets the architect’s ideas with DYNAMO, a dynamic memory of design cases, to support concept development in architectural design. So far, a major obstacle for the breakthrough of digital case bases like DYNAMO has been the separateness of these tools from the architect’s working environment. Having to leave this environment to consult a case base inconveniently interrupts the design process. The remedy proposed in this paper was inspired by the Shift+F7 shortcut in Ms Word. Just like this shortcut allows authors to look up synonyms in a thesaurus without having to leave the text, linking Idea Space to DYNAMO enables architects to trigger case retrieval ‘en passant’, that is during the very act of designing.
series other
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2004/03/25 16:59

_id heylighen_ds2003
id Heylighen DS2003
authors Heylighen , Ann and Verstijnen, Ilse M.
year 2003
title Close encounters of the architectural kind
source Design Studies, Volume 24, Issue 4, 2003, pp. 313-326
summary Throughout their career architects collect an extensive record of architectural cases, which they use as a source of inspiration and knowledge during design. Being novices, student architects do not yet have such a record. In order to compensate for this lack of knowledge, teachers in architecture engage their students into realistic yet simulated projects and introduce them to relevant architectural precedents for these projects. Within the realm of AI, case-based reasoning (CBR) stresses the importance of cases too. So far, however, applications that flow from CBR research have rarely found their way into architecture. The experiment that is reported in this article examines the conditions under which CBR technology can be useful in architectural education. The results show that in order for students to benefit from this technology, it should supply cases that are closely related to the project at hand. These results are consistent with psychological theories of knowledge representation in novices.
keywords case-based reasoning; design education; analogical reasoning
series journal paper
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2004/03/25 16:57

_id 6b43
id 6b43
authors Heylighen A, Casaer M, Neuckermans H
year 2005
title SHARING-IN-ACTION. HOW DESIGNERS CAN SHARE INSIGHTS WITHOUT KNOWING
source P. Kommers & P. Isaías (eds), Web Based Communities 2005, Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference on Web-Based Communities 2005, Algarve (Portugal), Feb 2005, pp.238-245 (ISBN 972-99353-7-8)
summary In architecture, design ideas are developed as much through interaction as by individuals in isolation. This awareness inspired the development of a Dynamic Architectural Memory On-line, an interactive platform to share ideas, knowledge and insights in the form of concrete building projects among designers in different contexts and at different levels of expertise. Interaction with various user groups revealed this platform to suffer from at least two thresholds. First of all, making projects available to other platform users takes time, effort, and specific skills. Secondly, designers tend to sense a psychological threshold to share their ideas and insights with others. In trying to tackle both thresholds, this paper proposes to conceive the platform as an associative network of projects, and develops ideas about how the relationships in this network can be determined and updated by exploiting the insights implicitly available in the project documentation and user (inter)actions. In the long run, this should allow the platform to learn from all designers using the platform, including those who do not release information on their own projects, and to apply the lessons learned to continuously enhance its performance.
keywords web-based communities, self-organization, data mining, design experience
series other
type normal paper
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2005/04/01 11:25

_id 2d39
id 2d39
authors Heylighen A, Heylighen F, Bollen J, Casaer M
year 2005
title A DISTRIBUTED MODEL FOR TACIT DESIGN KNOWLEDGE EXCHANGE
source SID 2005, Proceedings of the 4th Social Intelligence Design Workshop, Stanford University, March 2005 (CD Rom)
summary The distributed cognition approach, and by extension the domain of social intelligence design, attempts to integrate three until recently separate realms: mind, society, and matter. The field offers a heterogeneous collection of ideas, observations, and case studies, yet lacks a coherent theoretical framework for building models of concrete systems and processes. Despite the intrinsic complexity of integrating individual, social and technologically-supported intelligence, the paper proposes a relatively simple ‘connectionist’ framework for conceptualizing a distributed cognitive system. This framework represents shared information sources (documents) as nodes connected by links of variable strength, which increases interactively with the number of co-occurrences of documents in the patterns of their usage. This connectionist learning procedure captures and uses the implicit knowledge of its community of users to help them find relevant information, thus supporting an unconscious form of exchange. The principles are illustrated by an envisaged application to a concrete problem domain: the dynamic sharing of design knowledge among a multitude of architects through a database of associatively connected building projects.
keywords connectionism, distributed cognition, tacit knowledge, architectural design
series other
type normal paper
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2005/04/01 11:24

_id e537
authors Heylighen, A., Segers, R. and Neuckermans, H.
year 1998
title InterAction through Information
source Computerised Craftsmanship [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Paris (France) 24-26 September 1998, pp. 87-92
summary Past designs have been recognised as a significant source of knowledge in architectural design. IT offers the opportunity to represent these designs not only by text, graphics and images, but also by 3D-models, computer animation, sound and video. In spite of the growing availability of multimedia archives, libraries and case bases, their contribution to the development of students? ?design craftsmanship? so far seems to be limited. If IT wants to make a valuable contribution to this development, the challenge is not to passively provide students with information on past designs, but to (inter)actively support the dynamic interplay between these designs and the student?s design process. We are developing a tool that fundamentally attempts to explore this potential by using information as a vehicle to initiate, nurture and improve this interplay. The tool, which is intended to assist (student-)architects during the early conceptual stage of design, is conceived as a an (inter)active workhouse rather than a passive warehouse: it is interactively developed by and actively develops its users? knowledge. We have implemented a working prototype of the tool, at first stage for the design studio, yet with the potential of expansion into the office setting.
series eCAADe
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
more http://www.paris-valdemarne.archi.fr/archive/ecaade98/html/08heylighen/index.htm
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id heylighenieee2003
id HeylighenIEEE2003
authors Heylighen, A., Neuckermans, H. and Morisse, P.
year 2003
title What You See is What You Get
source IEEE Multimedia, July-Sept 2003, Vol. 10, No. 3, pp. 48-56
summary As the amount of visual information stored on electronic media grows, the need for appropriate access mechanisms becomes more critical. Information system developers in fields as varied as agriculture, medicine, and security must not only create systems to represent, store, and process visual content, but also re-examine the indexing procedure and conceive interfaces that make visual information easily accessible. Architectural design, a field overrun by myriad case libraries, manifests this challenge. Cases – specific designs from the past – are a significant source of knowledge in the architectural design field. Using current information technologies, researchers in this field have created a variety of multimedia case collections, storing them on CD-ROM, local networks, and the Internet. Several tools for accessing case collections exist; however most rely on verbal descriptions to index cases. For the collections to support architects during design, cases should not only be represented visually, but should also be accessible through a visual medium. We’ve developed a working prototype of a visual indexing and access mechanism that uses visual keys – small pictogram-like icons expressing an architectural feature. Users can consult an online case base using these keys or create new keys to label and link cases. A pilot study, in which student and professional architects used and evaluated the prototype, supports the need for such a mechanism.
series journal paper
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2004/03/25 16:55

_id ecaade03_579_06_heylighen
id ecaade03_579_06_heylighen
authors Heylighen, A., Ryckewaert, M. and Neuckermans, H.
year 2003
title Yet another paper about integration?
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 579-582
summary Confronted with the changing educational landscape, our architecture program faces the need for integration: integration of CAAD-related subjects into the curriculum, but above all integration of the curriculum as such. This inspired the idea to view ICT as an ally in tuning various courses to each other by what unites them all: the concrete architectural project. Within the scope of a two-year pilot project, we examined whether and how the use of ICT could improve the integration between a exemplary course, seminar and design studio. Despite evident links between the three, students and teachers used to consider these as separate entities. Without ignoring the individual character of each, the pilot project aimed at initiating a process of synergetic and cumulative knowledge development, whereby ICT played various roles. Across the board, the objective to stimulate a synergy among different components in the curriculum has been partially realized. Questions arise, however, as to who will take care of the extra tasks brought about by the use and maintenance of ICT after the project has ended.
keywords Design Pedagogies
series eCAADe
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
more http://www.asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id e9b1
authors Heylighen, Ann and Neuckermans, Herman
year 2001
title Destination: Practice – Towards a maintenance contract for the architect’s degree
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 090-099
summary Addressing the subject of Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) in architectural design, we present a Web-based design assistant for student- and professional architects called DYNAMO. Its main objective is to initiate and nurture the life-long process of learning from (design) experience as suggested by CBR’s cognitive model. Rather than adopting this model as such, DYNAMO extrapolates it beyond the individual by stimulating and intensifying several modes of interaction. One mode – the focus of this paper – concerns the interaction between the realm of design education and the world of practice. DYNAMO offers a platform for exchanging design efforts and insights, in the form of cases, between both parties, which perfectly chimes with the current tendency towards life-long learning and continuing education. Just like our university advises graduates to ‘Take a maintenance contract with your degree’, architecture schools may encourage recently qualified architects to subscribe to DYNAMO. To what extent the tool can fulfill this role of maintenance contract is discussed at the end of the paper, which reports on how DYNAMO was used and appreciated by professional architects at different levels of expertise.
keywords Case-Based Reasoning, Web-Based Learning, Digital Repositories
series ACADIA
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id c6db
authors Heylighen, Ann
year 2000
title In Case of Architectural Design. Critique and Praise of Case-Based Design in Architecture
source Dissertation - Doct. Toegepaste wetenschappen, KU Leuven, Fac. Toegepaste wetenschappen, Dep. architectuur, stedebouw en ruimtelijke ordening (ISBN 90-5682-248-9)
summary Architects are said to learn design by experience. Learning design by experience is the essence of Case-Based Design (CBD), a sub-domain of Artificial Intelligence. Part I critically explores the CBD approach from an architectural point of view, tracing its origins in the Theory of Dynamic Memory and highlighting its potential for architectural design. Seven CBD systems are analysed, experienced architects and design teachers are interviewed, and an experiment is carried out to examine how cases affect the design performance of architecture students. The results of this exploration show that despite its sound view on how architects acquire (design) knowledge, CBD is limited in important respects: it reduces architectural design to problem solving, is difficult to implement and has to contend with prejudices among the target group. With a view to stretching these limits, part II covers the design, implementation and evaluation of DYNAMO (Dynamic Architectural Memory On-line). This Web-based design tool tailors the CBD approach to the complexity of architectural design by effecting three transformations: extending the concern with design products towards design processes, turning static case bases into dynamic memories and upgrading users from passive case consumers to active case-based designers.
keywords Architectural Design; Case-Based Design
series thesis:PhD
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2002/12/14 18:29

_id a22a
authors Heylighen, Ann and Neuckermans, Herman
year 2002
title ARE ARCHITECTS NATURAL CASE-BASED DESIGNERS? EXPERTS SPEAKING
source The Design Journal, Volume 5, Issue 2, 2002, pp. 8-22
summary Addressing the subject of Case-Based Reasoning in design, this article reports on a series of in-depth interviews with expert architects/design teachers about the role of cases in design practice and education. Several ingredients of the Case-Based Design (CBD) recipe turned out to occur in real-world design, be it in a subtler version than CBD researchers usually assume. The article focuses primarily on design in architecture, yet the findings may be relevant for other design domains as well.
keywords Architectural Design; Case-based Design; Design Education
series journal paper
type normal paper
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2005/07/26 16:53

_id 5e85
authors Heylighen, Ann and Neuckermans, Herman
year 1999
title Learning from Experience: Promises, Problems and Side-effects of CBD in Architecture
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 567-575
summary Learning from design experience is the essence of Case-Based Design (CBD). Because architects are said to learn design by experience, CBD seems to hold great promises for architectural design, which have inspired various CBD tools. Learning from the experience of developing and using these tools is the objective of this paper. On the one hand, the original expectations seem far from being accomplished today. Reasons for this limited success can be found at three different levels. Level one is the cognitive model underlying CBD, which raises some specific difficulties within the field of architecture. At the level of implementation, few tools manage to draw the full consequences of this view, thus leading to an oversimplification of CBD and/or architectural design. Level three has to do with introducing CBD tools in design education and assessing the effects of this introduction. On the other hand, CBD seems to have caused some interesting side effects, such as an increased interest in creativity and copyright, and the recent re-discovery of the key-role cases play inside and outside the field of CAAD. Thus, although its promises may not be fulfilled, CBD definitely can contribute to design education, be it sometimes without the support of computer technology.
keywords Case-Based Design, Design Education
series eCAADe
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 3338
authors Heylighen, Ann and Neuckermans, Herman
year 2000
title DYNAMO - Dynamic Architectural Memory On-line
source Educational Technology and Society, Vol.3, No.2, April 2000 (ISSN 1436-4522), pp. 86-95
summary This paper describes the current status of DYNAMO, a web-based design assistant for students and professional designers in the field of architecture. The tool can be considered a Case-Based Design (CBD) system in so far that it was inspired by the view of cognition underlying CBD. The paper points out how DYNAMO incorporates this view, and at the same time extrapolates it beyond the individual. In this way, the tool attempts to embrace and profit from several kinds of interaction that are crucial for the development and renewal of design knowledge. This should result in a design tool that both feels cognitively comfortable to (student-) designers, and offers them a platform for exchanging knowledge and insights with colleagues in different contexts and at different levels of experience. In addition, the paper describes the implementation of these theoretical ideas as a working prototype, which has recently been tested by 4th year design students. Finally, DYNAMO is situated in the context of other comparable tools that have been or are being developed in the field of architectural design.
keywords Educational Multimedia, Interactive Learning Environments, Online Education
series journal paper
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
more http://ifets.gmd.de/periodical/vol_2_2000/heylighen.html
last changed 2002/11/14 07:40

_id 83b5
authors Heylighen, Ann and Neuckermans, Herman
year 2000
title Time, equipment and encouragement - Travel requisites for the World-Wide Wanderstudent
source G. Van der Perre and P. Vandevelde (eds.), The Wanderstudent 2000: The Wanderstudent of 1425 revived in virtual reality in 2000? Towards a European Virtual University, Proceedings of the International Colloquium organised by EuroPACE at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium, on October 20-21, 2000 Leuven University Press, Leuven (Belgium), 2000 (ISBN 90 5867 156 9), pp. 133-136
summary In Winter/Spring 1999, DYNAMO - a Web-based design assistant for student architects - received its baptism of fire in a 4th year design studio at our department. The paper describes the setting and procedure of the baptism, the participation of the studio teaching staff, and the students' reactions and appreciation. Based on students' responses to a questionnaire and observations of the tool in use, we investigated whether DYNAMO succeeded in engaging students and what factors stimulated/hampered this engagement. Although students were noticeably enthusiastic about the tool, three factors revealed themselves as major obstacles to student engagement: lack of time, of encouragement by the teachers and of studio equipment. The paper concludes with lessons learned for the future of DYNAMO and, more in general, of ICT in education.
series journal paper
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2002/11/14 07:38

_id 10e9
authors Heylighen, Ann and Neuckermans, Herman
year 2000
title DYNAMO in Action - Development and Use of a Web-Based Design Tool
source J. Pohl & T. Fowler (eds.), Proceedings of the Focus Symposium on Advances in Computer-Based and Web-Based Collaborative Systems - InterSymp-2000 International Conference On Systems Research, Informatics and Cybernetics, Baden-Baden (Germany), July 31 - Aug 4, 2000 (ISBN 0-921836-88-0), pp. 233-242
summary Addressing the subject of Case-Based Design (CBD), the paper describes the development and use of a Web-based design tool called DYNAMO. The tool is firmly rooted in the Dynamic Memory Theory underlying the CBD approach. Yet, rather than adopting it as such, we have tried to enrich this approach by extrapolating it beyond the individual. This extrapolation stimulates and intensifies several modes of interaction. Doing so, DYNAMO tries to kill two birds with one stone. At short notice, it provides architects and architecture students with a rich source of inspiration, ideas and design knowledge for their present design task, as it is filled with a permanently growing collection of design cases that is accessible on-line. Its long-term objective is to initiate and nurture the life-long process of learning from (design) experience as suggested by the cognitive model underlying CBD, and Case-Based Reasoning in general. DYNAMO is therefore conceived as an (inter-)active workhouse rather than a passive warehouse: it is interactively developed by and actively develops the user's design knowledge. Whereas previous papers have focused on the theoretical ideas of DYNAMO, this paper points out how Web technology enables us to implement these ideas as a working prototype. Furthermore, an annotated scenario of the system in use is described.
keywords Case-Based Design, Web Technology, Architectural Design
series journal paper
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2002/11/22 13:50

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