CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 61 to 80 of 144

_id 8599
authors Heylighen, Ann and Neuckermans, Herman
year 2001
title Baptism of fire of a Web-based design assistant
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 111-124
summary DYNAMO – a Dynamic Architectural Memory On-line – is a Web-based design assistant to support architectural design education. The tool is conceived as an (inter-)active workhouse rather than a passive warehouse: it is interactively developed by and actively develops its users' design knowledge. Its most important feature is not merely that it presents students with design cases, but that those cases trigger in-depth explorations, stimulate reflection and prime discussions between students, design teachers and professional architects. Whereas previous papers have focused on the theoretical ideas behind DYNAMO and on how Web-technology enabled us to translate these ideas into a working prototype, this paper reports on the prototype's baptism of fire in a 4th year design studio. It describes the setting and procedure of the baptism, the participation of the studio teaching staff, and the reactions and appreciation of the students. Based on students' responses to a questionnaire and observations of the tool in use, we investigated whether DYNAMO succeeded in engaging students and what factors stimulated/hampered this engagement. Despite the prototype nature of the system, students were noticeably enthusiastic about the tool. Moreover, DYNAMO turned out to be fairly 'democratic', in the sense that it did not seem to privilege students with private access to or prior knowledge of computer technology. However, the responses to the questionnaire raise questions about the nature of students' engagement. Three factors revealed themselves as major obstacles to student (inter-)action: lack of time, lack of encouragement by the teachers and lack of studio equipment. Although these obstacles may not relate directly to DYNAMO itself, they might have prevented the tool from functioning the way it was originally meant to. The paper concludes with lessons learned for the future of DYNAMO and, more in general, of ICT in architectural design education.
keywords Design Studios, Utilization Of Internet, Design Support, Case-Based Design
series CAAD Futures
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 9f7b
authors Heylighen, Ann and Segers, Nicole M.
year 2002
title Crossing Two Thresholds with one Stepping Stone – Scenario for a More Comfortable Design Environment
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 145-153
summary In architecture, design ideas are developed as much through interaction as by individuals in isolation.This awareness inspired the development of a dynamic architectural memory online, an interactiveplatform to share ideas, knowledge and insights among architects/designers in different contexts and atdifferent levels of expertise. User interaction revealed this platform to suffer from at least two thresholds:First of all, consultation during design is impeded by a physical threshold that separates the platformfrom the designer’s working environment. Secondly, designers tend to sense a psychological thresholdto share their ideas and insights with others. This paper proposes to cross both thresholds byconnecting the collective platform to a private design space, where designers can feel free to jot downand reflect on their ideas without fear for criticism, compromise or copying. This connection should allowthem to access the platform during the very act of designing, and to regulate to what extent they ‘giveaway’ their own ideas. The latter regulation is literally meant as a stepping stone that if not primes, thenat least paves the way for a sincere shift in mentality.
series ACADIA
email ann_heylighen@yahoo.com
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id heyhlighenijdc2003
id HeyhlighenIJDC2003
authors Heylighen, Ann and Segers, Nicole
year 2003
title Look Who's Suggesting
source International Journal of Design Computing, 2003, Volume 6
summary During design architects do not only sketch, they combine different kinds of information and representations. The combination of text, image, sketch and/or draft can provoke new associations that keep the design process going. The sketchbook presented here enables architects to use all representations simultaneously, so as to fully exploit their cross-fertilisation. More importantly, it steadily makes suggestions for continuing development of design ideas. These suggestions can take the form of words that are semantically related to the users’ ideas, or of images showing how other architects have developed related ideas into built artefacts. To this end, the sketchbook captures all information the architect/user puts ‘on paper’ and forwards it to a design idea recorder/interpreter called Idea Space System (ISS). In trying to understand the user’s ideas, ISS places all elements captured into a gigantic network, as if part of the frame of reference is made explicit. In the network nodes are words, sketches or images, while links represent relations of various origins. The semantic relations that ISS identifies are shown to the user. At the same time, words are processed as search criteria in DYNAMO, a growing architectural case base, to detect and display design projects that exemplify related ideas. Through the explicit links between early ideas and concrete design cases, the sketchbook acts as a permanent source of inspiration, while stimulating both architects’ creativity and their awareness of the downstream implications of design ideas.
series journal paper
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
more http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/kcdc/journal/vol6/
last changed 2004/03/25 16:51

_id 668b
authors Heylighen, Ann
year 2001
title End, means and method - Three roles of design(ing) technology in design research
source Digital Creativity, Volume 12, No. 2, 2001 (ISSN 1462-6268), pp. 103-105
summary This article explores an approach to design research in which the development of design technology plays a key role. It presents the author's Ph.D. research on the role of cases in architectural design. The research aimed at investigating the applicability of Case-Based Design (CBD) to the domain of architecture. To this end, the author adopted and confronted different stakeholder perspectives, one of which is that of CBD technology developer. By consequence, a considerable part of the research covers the design, implementation and evaluation of a CBD tool to support architects/designers. The research did not have a strictly instrumental aim, but wanted to provide insights for the field of architectural design on both a theoretical and a technological level. While the tool itself aimed at providing architects with valuable design support, making the tool was used as a method to develop a better understanding of current CBD technology. Moreover, the resulting tool turned out to be an effective means to examine the role and impact of cases in architectural design. Rather than reporting on the outcome of the research, the main objective of the article is to make a methodological reflection on the possibilities and limitations of this approach.
keywords Design Research, Architectural Design, CAAD, Case-Based Design
series journal paper
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2002/11/14 07:38

_id heyligheneaae2003
id HeylighenEAAE2003
authors Heylighen, Ann
year 2003
title A maintenance contract for the architect's degree - Concept, materialisation and post-occupancy
source Ebbe Harder (ed.), Writings in Architectural Education, Transactions on architectural education No 15, EAAE/AEEA, pp.134-147
summary Today, architecture is confronted with changing concepts of time, space and place. These changes are largely induced by the advent of the information society and in turn induce the need for entirely new ways of conceiving architectural education. It is obvious, however, that architectural education does not hold absolute sway over the need for renewal, as other domains and disciplines too are confronted with the inevitable learning society: a society in which individuals, groups and companies are learning on a permanent basis. What architectural education does hold absolute sway over – or at least should be granted a patent for – is the unique way in which it used to prepare (and still prepares) its students for practice in the design studio. Therefore, instead of throwing out the design studio with the bathwater, we consider it as an outstanding lead for pursuing the learning society within the context of architecture. Furthermore, we see ICT not only as a cause of, but at the same time as an ally in this pursuit, as it allows reinforcing the studio as “espace transitoire”. To this end, we propose to literally connect the studio with the world of practice through an on-line platform constructed of concrete cases.
keywords Architectural education, ICT
series journal paper
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2004/03/25 16:54

_id 32b4
id 32b4
authors Heylighen, Ann; Casaer, Mathias; Neuckermans, Herman
year 2006
title UNAWARE: SUPPORTING TACIT DESIGN KNOWLEDGE EXCHANGE
source International Journal of Web-Based Communities, Volume 2, Number 1, Jan 2006, pp.31-44
summary DYNAMO (Dynamic Architectural Memory Online) is an interactive platform to share ideas, knowledge and insights in the form of concrete building projects among designers in different contexts and at different levels of expertise. Interaction with various user groups revealed two major thresholds: submitting project material to the platform takes time, effort, and specific skills; in addition, designers tend to sense a psychological threshold to share their ideas and insights with others. In response to this ‘free-ridership’, the paper proposes to conceive DYNAMO as an associative network of projects, and develops ideas about how the links in this network can be determined and updated by exploiting insights implicitly available in project documentation and user (inter)actions. This should allow DYNAMO to learn from the insights of all designers using the platform, active contributors and ‘free-riders’ alike, without any awareness on their side and to apply these insights to continuously enhance its performance.
keywords architectural design; self-organisation; usage logs; connectionism
series other
type normal paper
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.be
last changed 2006/02/01 13:28

_id 1959
id 1959
authors Heylighen, Ann; Martin, W Mike; Cavallin, Humberto
year 2004
title FROM REPOSITORY TO RESOURCE -- EXCHANGING STORIES OF AND FOR ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICE
source Journal of Design Research, Volume 4, Issue 1, 2004 [ISSN 1569-1551]
summary Central to Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) is the claim that knowledge in human memory takes the form of cases, i.e. interpreted representations of concrete experiences. The intimate relationship between knowledge and experience in design has inspired CBR researchers to develop various Case-Based Design tools, which try to support architects (and designers in general) in capitalizing on previous design experience. Typically, these tools is built around a case base, an indexed collection of concrete cases labeled by a set of characteristic features. In general, cases document buildings, i.e. design products. By contrast, Building Stories has chosen to complement product data by stories about the process that generated the product. Previous papers have documented and illustrated the ideas underlying Building Stories and situated the methodology with regard to other case study approaches. The present paper focuses on establishing the growing repository of building stories into a valuable resource of and for the profession.
series other
type normal paper
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
more http://jdr.tudelft.nl/articles/issue2004.01/Art3.html
last changed 2005/01/26 21:50

_id ijac20031203
id ijac20031203
authors Heylighen, Ann; Neuckermans, Herman
year 2003
title (Learning from Experience)? Promises, Problems and Side-effects of Case-Based Reasoning in Architectural Design
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 1
summary Learning from experience is the essence of Case-Based Reasoning (CBR). Because architects are said to learn design by experience, CBR seemed to hold great promises for their field, which inspired, in the 1990s, the development of various Case-Based Design (CBD) tools. Learning from the experience of developing and using these tools is the objective of this paper. On the one hand, the original expectations seem far from being accomplished today. Reasons for this limited success can be found at three different levels: the cognitive model underlying CBR, the implementation of this model into concrete CBD tools, and the context in which these tools are to be used. On the other hand, CBR research seems to have caused some interesting side effects, such as an increased interest in creativity and copyright, and a re-discovery of the key role that cases play in architectural design.
series journal
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id 1366
id 1366
authors Heylighen, Ann; Neuckermans, Herman; Casaer, Mathias
year 2004
title ICT REVISITED - FROM INFORMATION & COMMUNICATION TO INTEGRATING CURRICULA?
source ITcon Vol. 9, Special Issue Digital Media Libraries, pg. 101-120, [ISSN 1400-6529]
summary The paper presents a longitudinal study on the iterative implementation and testing of a support tool for precedent-based design. DYNAMO—Dynamic Architectural Memory On-line—was originally conceived as an interactive workhouse to stimulate and support student and professional architects in learning from previous design experience as encapsulated by concrete design projects. Five years after its baptism of fire, the paper looks back on how DYNAMO’s role has gradually evolved from an information and communication platform to an instrument for improving curriculum integration through a process of cumulative knowledge development. After briefly recalling the underlying ideas of DYNAMO and their stepwise implementation as an operational platform, a series of case studies documents how the platform has been brought into action in different contexts—within, across and beyond architecture schools. Besides valuable feedback on DYNAMO’s prototype, these case studies have generated more general insights regarding design and design tool support, which largely transcend the platform as such.
keywords architecture, ICT, design support, digital media libraries
series other
type normal paper
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
more http://www.itcon.org/2004/7
last changed 2005/01/26 21:46

_id ecaade2007_098
id ecaade2007_098
authors Heylighen, Ann; Neuckermans, Herman; Wolpers, Martin; Casaer, Mathias; Duval, Erik
year 2007
title Sharing and Enriching Metadata in Architectural Repositories
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 401-408
summary All over the world, students and teachers in architecture have been developing learning materials in various digital formats. Unfortunately, the material is not shared across school boundaries, and thus not exploited to its full extent. Mostly, technical and organisational limitations hamper the sharing and exchange of learning material, although this would benefit the global community of students and teachers in architecture. This paper presents a recently launched EU-initiative called MACE—Metadata for Architectural Contents in Europe—which aims at creating a European-wide space for the electronic descriptions of architectural information to be used in architectural education. The idea is to exchange and enhance the metadata of as many as possible digital repositories in order to allow searches by distant partners. Real access conditions to the data still remain those specific for each repository. By describing and discussing this initiative in its early stage, the paper aims to benefit from the exchange of ideas and experiences with similar initiatives, and to trigger the interest of new repository owners to join MACE.
keywords Digital repositories, metadata, architecture
series eCAADe
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.be
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id acadia16_318
id acadia16_318
authors Huang, Alvin
year 2016
title From Bones to Bricks: Design the 3D Printed Durotaxis Chair and La Burbuja Lamp
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 318-325
summary Drawing inspiration from the variable density structures of bones and the self-supported cantilvers of corbelled brick arches, the Durotaxis Chair and the La Burbuja lamp explore a material-based design process by responding to the challenge of designing a 3D print, rather than 3D printing a design. As such, the fabrication method and materiality of 3D printing define the generative design constraints that inform the geometry of each. Both projects are seen as experiments in the design of 3D printed three-dimensional space packing structures that have been designed specifically for the machines by which they are manufactured. The geometry of each project has been carefully calibrated to capitalize on a selection of specific design opportunities enabled by the capabilities and constraints of additive manufacturing. The Durotaxis Chair is a half-scale prototype of a fully 3D printed multi-material rocking chair that is defined by a densely packed, variable density three-dimensional wire mesh that gradates in size, scale, density, color, and rigidity. Inspired by the variable density structure of bones, the design utilizes principal stress analysis, asymptotic stability, and ergonomics to drive the logics of the various gradient conditions. The La Burbuja Lamp is a full scale prototype for a zero-waste fully 3D printed pendant lamp. The geometric articulation of the project is defined by a cellular 3D space packing structure that is constrained to the angles of repose and back-spans required to produce un-supported 3D printing.
keywords parametic design, digital fabrication, structural analysis, additive manufacturing, 3d printing
series ACADIA
type paper
email alvin@synthesis-dna.com
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id acadia16_6
id acadia16_6
authors Johnson, Jason Kelly
year 2016
title Foreword: Complex Entanglements
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 6-7
series ACADIA
type foreword
email jason@future-cities-lab.net
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id acadia16_34
id acadia16_34
authors Johnson, Jason S.; Parker, Matthew
year 2016
title Architectural Heat Maps: A Workflow for Synthesizing Data
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 34-33
summary Over the last 5 years, large-scale ‘data dumps’ of architectural production have been made available online through project-specific websites (mainly competitions) and architectural aggregation/dissemination sites like Architizer, Suckerpunch, and Archinect. This reinforces the broader context of Ubiquitous Simultaneity, in which large amounts of data are continuously updated and easily accessed through a dizzying array of mobile devices. This condition is being exploited by sports leagues and financial speculators through the development of tools that collect, visualize, and analyze historical data for the purpose of producing speculative predictive simulations that could lead to strategies for enhanced performance. We explore the development of a workflow for deploying computer vision, SIFT algorithms, image aggregation, and heteromorphic deformation as a design strategy. These techniques have all been developed separately for various applications and here we combine them in such a way as to allow for the embedding of the historical and speculative artifacts of architectural production into newly formed three-dimensional architectural bodies. This work builds on past research, which resulted in a more two-dimensional image-based mapping and translation process found in existing imaging protocols for projects like Google Earth, and transitions towards the production of data-rich formal assemblies. Outliers and concentrations of visual data are exploited as a means to encourage innovation within the production of architecture.
keywords historical and speculative data, generative design, computer vision, ubiquitous simultaneity, sensate systems
series ACADIA
type paper
email jason.johnson@ucalgary.ca
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id 4da4
authors Jordan, J. Peter
year 1988
title ARCH 431: Computer-Aided Design
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 187-200
summary There is a significant variance in the way computer courses are taught at various institutions around the country. Generally, it is useful to think of these courses falling either into a "tool-building" or a "tool-using" category. However, within either category, there is a variety of focus on the application of the "tool". Two courses have been developed at the University of Hawaii at Manoa which deal with computer applications. The first course is more quantitatively oriented, encouraging students to explore ways of dealing with problems in a more complex and substantial manner. This paper deals with the second course whose focus has shifted toward design issues, using the computer as a tool to explore these issues. This course exposes the student, not to training on a specific computer-aided drafting system, but to issues in computer-aided design which include hardware and software systems, human-machine interface, and the nature of the design process. This course seems to be an appropriate model for introducing computer-aided design to undergraduates in a professional design program.
series ACADIA
email jpjordan@flash.net
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id ddss2006-hb-53
id DDSS2006-HB-53
authors Junfeng Jiao and Luc Boerboom
year 2006
title Transition Rule Elicitation Methods for Urban Cellular Automata Models
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Innovations in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Springer, ISBN-10: 1-4020-5059-3, ISBN-13: 978-1-4020-5059-6, p. 53-68
summary In this chapter, transition rules used in urban CA models are reviewed and classified into two categories: transition potential rules and conflict resolution rules. Then, four widely used rule elicitation methods: Regression analysis, Artificial Neural network (ANN), Visual calibration, and Analytical Hierarchy Processing - Multi Criteria Evaluation (AHP-MCE) are discussed. Most of these methods are data driven methods and can be used to elicit the transition potential rules in the urban CA models. In the following, three possible rule elicitation methods: Interview, Document analysis, and Card sorting are explained and demonstrated. These three methods are driven by knowledge and can be used to elicit conflict resolution rules as well as transition potential rules in urban CA models.
keywords Cellular Automata (CA), Simulation, Modelling, Transition rule, Elicitation
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id 6424
authors Katz, Genevieve
year 1988
title Paint Systems as a Design Tool .... "Oh Wow!"
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 224-233
summary The use of computer graphics paint systems is investigated as a primary design tool in the architecture studio. Paint programs are more conducive than CAD systems to providing a supportive environment for the exploration of design concepts.

series ACADIA
email gen@games4girls.com
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id acadia16_88
id acadia16_88
authors Klemmt, Christoph; Bollinger, Klaus
year 2016
title Load Responsive Angiogenesis Networks: Structural Growth Simulations of Discrete Members using Variable Topology Spring Systems
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 88-97
summary Venation systems in leaves, which form their structural support, always connect back to one seed point, the petiole of the leaf. In order to develop similar structural networks for architectural use which connect to more seed points on the ground, an algorithm has been developed which can develop from two or three seed points, inspired by angiogenesis, the process through which the vascular system grows. This allows for the generation of structurally suitable topologies based on discrete members, which can be evaluated using Finite Element Analysis and which can be constructed from linear structural members without an additional interpretation of the results. The networks have been developed as load bearing spring systems above the support points. Different structures have been compared and tested using Finite Element Analysis. Compared to traditional column and beam structures, the angiogenesis networks as well as the venation networks are shown to perform well under load.
keywords venation, finite element analysis, angiongenesis, embedded responsiveness
series ACADIA
type paper
email christoph@orproject.com
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id acadia16_270
id acadia16_270
authors Korner, Axel; Mader, Anja; Saffarian, Saman; Knippers, Jan
year 2016
title Bio-Inspired Kinetic Curved-Line Folding for Architectural Applications
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp.270-279
summary This paper discusses the development of a bio-inspired compliant mechanism for architectural applications and explains the methodology of investigating movements found in nature. This includes the investigation of biological compliant mechanisms, abstraction, and technical applications using computational tools such as finite element analysis (FEA). To demonstrate the possibilities for building envelopes of complex geometries, procedures are presented to translate and alter the disclosed principles to be applicable to complex architectural geometries. The development of the kinetic façade shading device flectofold, based on the biological role-model Aldrovanda vesiculosa, is used to demonstrate the process. The following paper shows results of FEA simulations of kinetic curved-line folding mechanisms with pneumatic actuation and provides information about the relationship between varying geometric properties (e.g. curved-line fold radii) and multiple performance metrics, such as required actuation force and structural stability.
keywords composite forming process, form-finding, biomimetics and biological design, embedded responsiveness
series ACADIA
type paper
email a.koerner@itke.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id acadia16_130
id acadia16_130
authors Koschitz, Duks; Ramagosa, Bernat; Rosenbaum, Eric
year 2016
title Beetle Blocks: A New Visual Language for Designers and Makers
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 130-139
summary We are introducing a new teaching tool to show designers, architects, and artists procedural ways of constructing objects and space. Computational algorithms have been used in design for quite some time, but not all tools are very accessible to novice programmers, especially undergraduate students. ‘Beetle Blocks’ (beetleblocks.com) is a software environment that combines an easy-to-use graphical programming language with a generative model for 3D space, drawing on ‘turtle geometry,’ a geometry paradigm introduced by Abelson and Disessa, that uses a relative as opposed to an absolute coordinate system. With Beetle Blocks, designers are able to learn computational concepts and use them for their designs with more ease, as individual computational steps are made visually explicit. The beetle, the relative coordinate system, follows instructions as it moves about in 3D space. Anecdotal evidence from studio teaching in undergraduate programs shows that despite the early introduction of digital media and tools, architecture students still struggle with learning formal languages today. Beetle Blocks can significantly simplify the teaching of complex geometric ideas and we explain how this can be achieved via several examples. The blocks-based programming language can also be used to teach fundamental concepts of manufacturing and digital fabrication and we elucidate in this paper which possibilities are conducive for 2D and 3D designs. This project was previously implemented in other languages such as Flash, Processing and Scratch, but is now developed on top of Berkeley’s ‘Snap!’
keywords generative design, design pedagogy, digital fabrication, tool-building, pedagogical tools
series ACADIA
type paper
email duks@pratt.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id 4875
authors Kroll, Lucien
year 1986
title Enseigner L'Informatique aux Architectes?
source Teaching and Research Experience with CAAD [4th eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Rome (Italy) 11-13 September 1986, pp. 52-70
summary Mais ou en est l'architecture? Elle mute. Le grand air frais qui avait été amené par le Mouvement .- Moderne lorsqu'il était jeune, entre les deux guerres et quelques années après la guerre, s'était tiédi et avait fini par servir d'alibi aux pires médiocrités industrielle et bureaucratique: c'était toujours la faute de la Charte d'Athènes... Ceci reposait sur toutes sortes de contre-vérités et de malentendus qui ne sont pas encore tous levés actuellement et sont encore souvent enseignés dans nos écoles.

series eCAADe
last changed 1998/08/18 08:01

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