CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 144

_id acadia16_344
id acadia16_344
authors Leach, Neil
year 2016
title Digital Tool Thinking: Object-Oriented Ontology versus New Materialism
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 344-351
summary Within contemporary philosophy, two apparently similar movements have gained attention recently, New Materialism and Object Oriented Ontology. Although these movements have quite distinct genealogies, they overlap on one key issue: they are both realist movements that focus on the object. In contrast to much twentieth-century thinking centered on the subject, these two movements address the seemingly overlooked question of the object. In shifting attention away from the anthropocentrism of Humanism, both movements can be seen to subscribe to the broad principles of Posthumanism. Are these two movements, however, as similar as they first appear? And how might they be seen to differ in their approach to digital design? This paper is an attempt to evaluate and critique the recent strain of Object Oriented Ontology and question its validity. It does so by tracing the differences between OOO and New Materialism, specifically through the work of the neo-Heideggerian philosopher Graham Harman and the post-Deleuzian philosopher Manuel DeLanda, and by focusing on the question of the ‘tool’ in particular. The paper opens up towards the question of the digital tool, questioning the connection between Object Oriented Ontology and Object Oriented Programming, and introducing the theory of affordances as an alternative to the stylistic logic of ‘parametricism’ as a way of understanding the impact of digital tools on architectural production. The paper concludes that we need to recognize the crucial differences between the work of DeLanda and Harman, and that—if nothing else—within progressive digital design circles, we should be cautious of Harman’s brand of Object Oriented Ontology, not least because of its heavy reliance on the work of the German philosopher, Martin Heidegger.
keywords digital tools, obect-oriented ontology, new materialism, sensate systems
series ACADIA
type paper
email leachneil@gmail.com
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id a015
authors Leu, S.-S., Chen, C.-N. and Chang, S.-L.
year 2001
title Data mining for tunnel support stability: neural network approach
source Automation in Construction 10 (4) (2001) pp. 429-441
summary This paper presents a data mining approach to the prediction of tunnel support stability using artificial neural networks (ANN). The case data of a railway tunnel recently finished in Taiwan were used to establish the model. The main rock type was sedimentary rock. Rock mechanical and construction-related parameters with significant influences on support stability were filtered to train and test the ANN. Validation was also performed to show that the ANN outperformed the discriminant analysis and the multiple non-linear regression method in predicting tunnel support stability status.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id acadia16_382
id acadia16_382
authors Lopez, Deborah; Charbel, Hadin; Obuchi, Yusuke; Sato, Jun; Igarashi, Takeo; Takami, Yosuke; Kiuchi, Toshikatsu
year 2016
title Human Touch in Digital Fabrication
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 382-393
summary Human capabilities in architecture-scaled fabrication have the potential of being a driving force in both design and construction processes. However, while intuitive and flexible, humans are still often seen as being relatively slow, weak, and lacking the exacting precision necessary for structurally stable large-scale outputs—thus, hands-on involvement in on-site fabrication is typically kept at a minimum. Moreover, with increasingly advanced computational tools and robots in architectural contexts, the perfection and speed of production cannot be rivaled. Yet, these methods are generally non-engaging and do not necessarily require a skilled labor workforce, bringing to question the role of the craftsman in the digital age. This paper was developed with the focus of leveraging human adaptability and tendencies in the design and fabrication process, while using computational tools as a means of support. The presented setup consists of (i) a networked scanning and application of human movements and human on-site positioning, (ii) a lightweight and fast-drying extruded composite material, (iii) a handheld “smart” tool, and (iv) a structurally optimized generative form via an iterative feedback system. By redistributing the roles and interactions of humans and machines, the hybridized method makes use of the inherently intuitive yet imprecise qualities of humans, while maximizing the precision and optimization capabilities afforded by computational tools—thus incorporating what is traditionally seen as “human error” into a dynamically engaging and evolving design and fabrication process. The interdisciplinary approach was realized through the collaboration of structural engineering, architecture, and computer science laboratories.
keywords human computer interaction and design, craft in design, tool streams and tool building, cognate streams, sensate systems
series ACADIA
type paper
email deborahlopezlobato@gmail.com
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id cf2019_010
id cf2019_010
authors Lorenz, Clara-Larissa; Bleil De Souza, Spaeth and Packianather
year 2019
title Machine Learning in Design Exploration: An Investigation of the Sensitivities of ANN-based Daylight Predictions
source Ji-Hyun Lee (Eds.) "Hello, Culture!"  [18th International Conference, CAAD Futures 2019, Proceedings / ISBN 978-89-89453-05-5] Daejeon, Korea, pp. 75-87
summary The use of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) promises greater efficiency in the assessment of daylight situations than simulations. With the daylight factor under scrutiny and the recent adaptation of climate-based daylight metrics in British and European buildings standards, ANNs provide a possibility for instantaneous feedback on otherwise time-consuming performance metrices. This study demonstrates the application of ANNs as prediction systems in design exploration. A specific focus of the research is the flexibility of ANNs, their reliability and sensitivity to changes.
keywords Artificial neural networks, atria, climate-based daylight modeling, daylight autonomy, daylight performance, parametric design
series CAAD Futures
email lorenzc4@cardiff.ac.uk
last changed 2019/07/29 12:08

_id acadia16_372
id acadia16_372
authors Maia, Sara Costa; Meyboom, AnnaLisa
year 2016
title Researching Inhabitant Agency in Interactive Architecture
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 372-381
summary The study of Interactive Architecture (IA) spans over several decades and appears to be gaining increasing momentum in recent years. Yet, inhabitant-centered approaches towards research and design in the field still have a long way ahead to explore. Particularly, we observed that the examination of IA’s social relevance in literature is still incipient and ill supported by evidence. The study discussed in this paper is attempting to remediate this gap by exploring one of the first socio-political arguments around the relevance of IA, namely inhabitant empowerment and agency. It investigates whether an inhabitant’s relation and experience with interactive spaces, conceived according to different interaction strategies, increases the participants’ perception of their own agency in the space. In this paper, we briefly explain the prototyping of an interactive space-plan designed to emulate the behavior of four basic models of interaction. Finally, the paper presents an experimental study set to test inhabitant agency in IA. It concludes that IA has the potential to increase inhabitant agency, but that this is very dependable on the system’s design regarding behavior and interaction.
keywords agency, responsive environments, interactive architecture, sensate systems
series ACADIA
type paper
email ameyboom@sala.ubc.ca
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id 876d
id 876d
authors Martin, W Mike; Heylighen, Ann; Cavallin, Humberto
year 2004
title THE RIGHT STORY AT THE RIGHT TIME -- TOWARDS A TACIT KNOWLEDGE RESOURCE FOR (STUDENT) DESIGNERS
source AI & Society, Issue: Online First, July 2004 [ISSN: 1435-5655 (Online)]
summary In response to the lack of systematic study of architectural practice, the Building Stories methodology propounds storytelling as a vehicle for studying active cases, i.e., projects that are in the process of being designed and built. The story format provides a dense, compact way to deal with and communicate the complex reality of a real-world project, while respecting the interrelated nature of events, people and circumstances that shape its conception. With an eye to establishing a valuable knowledge resource of and for the profession, the paper explores how stories can be stored, organized and accessed so as to turn the growing story repository into a convenient instrument for students, educators and practitioners.
keywords architectural practice, storytelling, knowledge exchange, design experience
series other
type normal paper
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
more http://www.springerlink.com/media/BEC67X4BWR6KXLBDVKWP/Contributions/W/K/G/X/WKGXJ3QQ6TQ4WQRY_html/fulltext.html
last changed 2005/01/26 22:02

_id 2a6e
authors McCullough, Malcolm
year 1988
title Representation in the Computer Aided Design Studio
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 163-174
summary Application of commercial computer aided design systems to schematic design in a studio setting in a professionally oriented university provides the opportunity for observation of extensive use of CAD by designers with little or no orientation toward computing. Within a framework of studios intended to contrast media and highlight the issue of design representation, the most encouraging applications of computing have involved dynamic visual design representation. This paper presents a case study of three studios at the University of Texas at Austin together with commentary on the place of computing in this essentially artistic environment. It presents, in slide form, a body of aesthetically oriented CAD work which signals the spread of computer aided design out of the hands of researchers and into mainstream architectural design, where development of the visual and dynamic aspects of the medium may prove to be primary routes to improvement of itS power and acceptance. Much like a first design project, this paper then presents a lot of observations without yet much rigorous development of any one. It asks implicitly whether application of software constitutes research.

series ACADIA
email mmmc@umich.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id 4901
authors McIntosh, John F.
year 1988
title The ASU Strategic Plan For Computing Support
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 301-310
summary Our College has spent approximately one hundred thousand dollars per year on computing over the last five years. This paper, which developed out of a University-wide strategic planning exercise, speaks to the question: What are we getting for all that money?

The background to this large planning exercise is sketched, the goals of our computing support plan are stated, the strategies aimed at achieving these goals are explained, and the observed outcomes from implementing these strategies are listed.

In evaluating the plan, this paper argues the position that a computer culture must take hold within the College before computer-aided design will have a truly profound effect upon pedagogy. Operationally, this means that every faculty member must have a personal computer and that every student must have free access to a microcomputer facility. Only then does the whole College adopt the new culture.

The fiscal commitment is high, but there are payoffs in of fice automation that justify the investment even in the short-term. Trivial as it seems, wordprocessing is the first step in seeding this culture. These short term payoffs help make the case for investing in the promise of long-term payoffs in superior design through computer aids.

series ACADIA
email john.mcintosh@asu.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id acadia12_87
id acadia12_87
authors Menicovich, David ; Gallardo, Daniele ; Bevilaqua, Riccardo ; Vollen, Jason
year 2012
title Generation and Integration of an Aerodynamic Performance Data Base Within the Concept Design Phase of Tall Buildings
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 87-96
summary Despite the fact that tall buildings are the most wind affected architectural typology, testing for aerodynamic performance is conducted during the later design phases well after the overall geometry has been developed. In this context, aerodynamic performance studies are limited to evaluating an existing design rather than a systematic performance study of design options driving form generation. Beyond constrains of time and cost of wind tunnel testing, which is still more reliable than Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations for wind conditions around buildings, aerodynamic performance criteria lack an immediate interface with parametric design tools. This study details a framework for empirical data collection through wind tunnel testing of building mechatronic models and the expansion of the collected dataset by determining a mathematical interpolating model using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithm developing an Aerodynamic Performance Data Base (APDB). Frederick Keisler called the interacting of forces CO-REALITY, which he defined as The Science of Relationships. In the same article Keisler proclaims that the Form Follows Function is an outmoded understanding that design must demonstrate continuous variability in response to interactions of competing forces. This topographic space is both constant and fleeting where form is developed through the broadcasting of conflict and divergence as a system seeks balance and where one state of matter is passing by another; a decidedly fluid system. However, in spite of the fact that most of our environment consists of fluids or fluid reactions, instantaneous and geologic, natural and engineered, we have restricted ourselves to approaching the design of buildings and their interactions with the environment through solids, their properties and geometry; flow is considered well after the concept design stage and as validation of form. The research described herein explores alternative relations between the object and the flows around it as an iterative process, moving away from the traditional approach of Form Follows Function to Form Follows Flow.
keywords Tall Buildings , Mechatronics , Artificial Neural Network , Aerodynamic Performance Data Base
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email david.menicovich@gmail.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id ec36
authors Meurant, Robert C.
year 1988
title Some Metaphysical Considerations Raised by the Computer-Generated Electronic Environment
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 59-70
summary The effects of the computer on the designer are profound, and affect design methodology and habitation. The computer-aided designer experiences within the electronic environment a freedom from certain important constraints of real-world modelling of physical reality. Electronic configurations are not bound by the constructional, material, or structural constraints operating in the physical world. This freedom is liberating, in that the imagination is given a powerful tool with which to develop external representations of ideal environments. But there is also the potential of destructive tendencies. Is the increasing sophistication of external tools of the imagination at the expense of the ability of the individual to master the internal imagination - are we externalizing at the price of inner vision? There is also the possibility of greater alienation from the physical world. We loose the tactile sensitivity, and the spatial and structural intuition with which we draw and make physical models. These are essential parts of the design of the physical environment.

We are left on the horns of a dilemma. The rapid response and exciting images of the computergenerated video environment suggest we are entering an era when architecture itself becomes electronic. The physical built-form recedes in importance, and may even become redundant. But we must also ask: Are we entering a post-computer age? Will we realize the potential profundity of our innate human biocomputers - to the point where we renounce the hard technology of the material for the soft technology of consciousness?

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/01/01 18:24

_id 8403
authors Mitchell, William J., Liggett, Robin S. and Tan, Milton
year 1988
title The Topdown System and its use in Teaching - An Exploration of Structured, Knowledge-Based Design
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 251-262
summary The Topdown System is a shell for use in developing simple (but we believe non-trivial) knowledge-based CAD systems. It provides a data structure, graphics capabilities, a sophisticated user interface, and programming tools for rapid construction of knowledge bases. Implementation is for Macintosh, Macintosh II, IBM PC/AT, PS12, and Sun workstations.

The basic idea is that of top-down design - beginning with a very abstract representation, and elaborating that, in step-by-step fashion, into a complete and detailed representation. The basic operations are real-time parametric variation of designs (using the mouse and slide bar) and substitution of objects. Essentially, then, a knowledge-base in Topdown implements a kind of parametric shape grammar.

The main applications of Topdown are in introductory teaching of CAD, and (since it provides a very quick and easy way for a user to develop detailed geometric models) to provide a uniform front-end for a variety of different applications. The shell, and some example knowledge-bases, are publicly available.

This paper discusses the principles of the Topdown Shell, the implementation of knowledge bases within it, and a variety of practical design applications.

series ACADIA
email wjm@MIT.EDU
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id acadia16_174
id acadia16_174
authors Moorman, Andrew; Liu, Jingyang; Sabin, Jenny E.
year 2016
title RoboSense: Context-Dependent Robotic Design Protocols and Tools
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 174-183
summary While nonlinear concepts are widely applied in analysis and generative design in architecture, they have not yet convincingly translated into the material realm of fabrication and construction. As the gap between digital design model, shop drawing, and fabricated result continues to diminish, we seek to learn from fabrication models and natural systems that do not separate code, geometry, pattern, material compliance, communication, and form, but rather operate within dynamic loops of feedback, reciprocity, and generative fabrication. Three distinct, but connected problems: 1) Robotic ink drawing; 2) Robotic wine pouring and object detection; and 3) Dynamically Adjusted Extrusion; were addressed to develop a toolkit including software, custom digital design tools, and hardware for robotic fabrication and user interaction in cyber-physical contexts. Our primary aim is to simplify and consolidate the multiple platforms necessary to construct feedback networks for robotic fabrication into a central and intuitive programming environment for both the advanced to novice user. Our experimentation in prototyping feedback networks for use with robotics in design practice suggests that the application of this knowledge often follows a remarkably consistent profile. By exploiting these redundancies, we developed a support toolkit of data structures and routines that provide simple integrated software for the user-friendly programming of commonly used roles and functionalities in dynamic robotic fabrication, thus promoting a methodology of feedback-oriented design processes.
keywords online programming, cyber-physical systems, computational design, robotic fabrication, human-robot interaction
series ACADIA
type paper
email jsabin@cornell.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id acadia16_140
id acadia16_140
authors Nejur, Andrei; Steinfeld, Kyle
year 2016
title Ivy: Bringing a Weighted-Mesh Representations to Bear on Generative Architectural Design Applications
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 140-151
summary Mesh segmentation has become an important and well-researched topic in computational geometry in recent years (Agathos et al. 2008). As a result, a number of new approaches have been developed that have led to innovations in a diverse set of problems in computer graphics (CG) (Sharmir 2008). Specifically, a range of effective methods for the division of a mesh have recently been proposed, including by K-means (Shlafman et al. 2002), graph cuts (Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008; Katz and Tal 2003), hierarchical clustering (Garland et al. 2001; Gelfand and Guibas 2004; Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008), primitive fitting (Athene et al. 2004), random walks (Lai et al.), core extraction (Katz et al.) tubular multi-scale analysis (Mortara et al. 2004), spectral clustering (Liu and Zhang 2004), and critical point analysis (Lin et al. 20070, all of which depend upon a weighted graph representation, typically the dual of a given mesh (Sharmir 2008). While these approaches have been proven effective within the narrowly defined domains of application for which they have been developed (Chen 2009), they have not been brought to bear on wider classes of problems in fields outside of CG, specifically on problems relevant to generative architectural design. Given the widespread use of meshes and the utility of segmentation in GAD, by surveying the relevant and recently matured approaches to mesh segmentation in CG that share a common representation of the mesh dual, this paper identifies and takes steps to address a heretofore unrealized transfer of technology that would resolve a missed opportunity for both subject areas. Meshes are often employed by architectural designers for purposes that are distinct from and present a unique set of requirements in relation to similar applications that have enjoyed more focused study in computer science. This paper presents a survey of similar applications, including thin-sheet fabrication (Mitani and Suzuki 2004), rendering optimization (Garland et al. 2001), 3D mesh compression (Taubin et al. 1998), morphin (Shapira et al. 2008) and mesh simplification (Kalvin and Taylor 1996), and distinguish the requirements of these applications from those presented by GAD, including non-refinement in advance of the constraining of mesh geometry to planar-quad faces, and the ability to address a diversity of mesh features that may or may not be preserved. Following this survey of existing approaches and unmet needs, the authors assert that if a generalized framework for working with graph representations of meshes is developed, allowing for the interactive adjustment of edge weights, then the recent developments in mesh segmentation may be better brought to bear on GAD problems. This paper presents work toward the development of just such a framework, implemented as a plug-in for the visual programming environment Grasshopper.
keywords tool-building, design simulation, fabrication, computation, megalith
series ACADIA
type paper
email ksteinfe@berkeley.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id caadria2007_489
id caadria2007_489
authors Neuckermans, Herman; Martin Wolpers, Mathias Casaer and Ann Heylighen
year 2007
title Data and Metadata in Architectural Repositories
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary In many schools all over the world, teachers as well as researchers have been developing digital learning contents. These contents exist mostly in isolation; that means in and within a school or in the personal files, although it would be much more profitable to the community of teachers in architecture to share the results of all these efforts. In this paper we present and discuss two different strategies regarding this ambition: The first develops digital pedagogical material and tries to invite others to contribute in order to create a big repository. As an example we will present DYNAMO, a dynamic architectural memory on-line built over the last 8 years, with to date more than 600 architectural projects fully documented with plans, pictures, texts and a fairly developed category search engine. In the second approach every owner of a repository keeps his/her data and shares its content with others through a central search engine. As an example we will present and discuss a recently launched EU-programme called MACE – Metadata for Architectural Contents in Europe – which aims at enhancing the metadata of as many as possible different repositories in order to allow searches by distant partners. Real access conditions to the data still will remain those specific for each repository. The purpose of this paper is to share information and (similar?) experiences in Asia or outside Europe in general.
series CAADRIA
email herman.neuckermans@asro.kuleuven.be
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id caadria2019_142
id caadria2019_142
authors Nguyen, Duong, Moleta, Tane Jacob and Schnabel, Marc Aurel
year 2019
title Mindful Manifestation - A method for designing architectural forms using brain activities
source M. Haeusler, M. A. Schnabel, T. Fukuda (eds.), Intelligent & Informed - Proceedings of the 24th CAADRIA Conference - Volume 1, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand, 15-18 April 2019, pp. 485-494
summary This paper describes the method of establishing a tool, interconnecting a selection of hardware and computational software to design architecture, through the manipulation of forms using brain activities inside a Virtual Reality (VR) environment. This is achieved through the use of electroencephalography (EEG), detecting brain activities and live streaming numerical data inside VR environment. Architectural forms are manipulated and interacted live by this data stream. The paper discusses the methods, findings, technical limitations as well as potential modifications which would otherwise improve the system's performance for the intended purposes.
keywords Electroencephalography (EEG); Artificial Neural Network (ANN); Virtual Reality (VR); Interactive Design; Parametric Design
series CAADRIA
email duongcuti@yahoo.com
last changed 2019/04/16 08:22

_id acadia16_308
id acadia16_308
authors Nicholas, Paul; Zwierzycki, Mateusz; Stasiuk, David; Norgaard, Esben; Thomsen, Mette Ramsgaard
year 2016
title Concepts and Methodologies for Multiscale Modeling: A Mesh-Based Approach for Bi-Directional Information Flows
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 308-317
summary This paper introduces concepts and methodologies for multiscale modeling in architecture, and demonstrates their application to support bi-directional information flows in the design of a panelized, thin skinned metal structure. Parameters linked to the incremental sheet forming fabrication process, rigidisation, panelization, and global structural performance are included in this information flow. The term multiscale refers to the decomposition of a design problem into distinct but interdependent models according to scales or frameworks, and to the techniques that support the transfer of information between these models. We describe information flows between the scales of structure, panel element, and material via two mesh-based approaches. The first approach demonstrates the use of adaptive meshing to efficiently and sequentially increase resolution to support structural analysis, panelization, local geometric formation, connectivity, and the calculation of forming strains and material thinning. A second approach shows how dynamically coupling adaptive meshing with a tree structure supports efficient refinement and coarsening of information. The multiscale modeling approaches are substantiated through the production of structures and prototypes.
keywords adaptive meshing, robotic fabrication, simulation, material behavior, incremental sheet forming, multiscale
series ACADIA
type paper
email paul.nicholas@kadk.dk
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id ca71
authors Noble, Douglas and Rittel, Horst W.J.
year 1988
title Issue-Based Information Systems for Design
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 275-286
summary The understanding of planning and design as a process of argumentation (of the designer with himself or with others) has led to the concept of IBIS (Issue-Based Information Systems). The elements of IBIS are Issues, each of which are associated with alternative positions. These in turn are associated with arguments which support or object to a given position (or another argument). In the course of the treatment of issues, new issues come up which are treated likewise.

Issue-Based Information Systems are used as a means of widening the coverage of a problem. By encouraging a greater degree of participation, particularly in the earlier phases of the process, the designer is increasing the opportunity that difficulties of his proposed solution, unseen by him, will be discovered by others. Since the problem observed by a designer can always be treated as merely a symptom of another higher-level problem, the argumentative approach also increases the likelyhood that someone will attempt to attack the problem from this point of view. Another desirable characteristic of the Issue-Based Information System is that it helps to make the design process 'transparent'. Transparency here refers tO the ability of observers as well as participants to trace back the process of decision-making.

This paper offers a description of a computer-supported IBIS (written in 'C' using the 'XWindows' user interface), including a discussion of the usefulness of IBIS in design, as well as comments on the role of the computer in IBIS implementation, and related developments in computing.

series ACADIA
email dnoble@usc.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id 0350
authors Norman, Richard B.
year 1988
title The Role of Color in Architectural Pedagogy Computation as a Creative Tool
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 217-223
summary From among the possible ways of introducing graphic computing in the design studio, it is customary to develop an argument from point, to line, to shape and finally to colon The logic of this process is undeniable as technology and perhaps as history, but it should be questioned as pedagogy. A designer, tuned to the visual focus of the studio and searching for creative self-expression is not overly stimulated by drawing lines, at first laboriously, in imitation of what he can do by hand.

Using color is among the more difficult of traditional studio chores -- it is not difficult on a computer. The manipulation of color can be a simple task if one is given reasonable software and a good graphic computer. Once introduced to students, the techniques for coloring elements on a computer find acceptance as a design tool. Methods can be quickly found for modifying the perception of space and form through the use of colon

Modern architecture is rooted in the study of color as a generator of form. This idea permeated the teachings of its founders. Yet modernist concern for color has over time evolved into a pedagogy of space and form at the exclusion of color, so much so that the modern movement today stands accused by its detractors as being formed in many shades of grey.

Modern architecture is not grey! This paper will illustrate how, using the modern graphic computer, color may be introduced to the studio and discovered as an element of design and as the substance of architectural form giving.

series ACADIA
email rnorman@CLEMSON.EDU
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id cb88
authors Novak, Marcos J.
year 1988
title Computational Composition in Architecture
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 5-30
summary The impact of computers on architectural design, manifested through the creation of architectural designs that equal or surpass in quality and sophistication architecture generated using traditional means, has yet to be demonstrated. Computer-aided design is conspicuously absent from theoretical discussions of architectural design per se, and there exist no major built or published buildings that have been designed using the computer in a true design capacity. Most prominent architects continue to ignore computer-aided design. This paper argues that the issues of architectural theory and composition must be addressed directly by the computer-aided design field, and that until this occurs computer-aided architectural design will necessarily be peripheral to architecture because it does not address the central problems of architecture as an expressive medium. To this end, it proposes a shift to the paradigm of computational composition, and discusses recent work in this direction.

The paper is divided into four parts. Part I identifies fundamental theoretical problems, contrasts the application of computation to architecture and to music, and draws upon several different areas for insight into the nature of making; Part II reviews particular architectural implications of these considerations, introduces the concept of computational composition in architecture, and presents a brief overview of important precedents; Part III proposes new goals for computer-aided architectural design and presents a framework for computational composition; finally, Part IV presents recent work directly related to the ideas presented in the previous parts and leads to the Conclusion. The appendices contain a pseudo-Prolog expression of Alvar Aalto's architectural language and notes on features of the PADL-2 solid modeler that are architecturally interesting.

series ACADIA
email marcos@centrifuge.org
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id 06fd
authors Oxman, Rivka and Heylighen, Ann
year 2001
title A Case with a View - Towards an Integration of Visual and Case-Based Reasoning in Design
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 346-341
summary Despite the long-term effort to establish the theoretical foundations for Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) in design, it appears that additional theoretical efforts are needed in order to achieve the promise of this affinity. In this paper we argue that visual reasoning, is a fundamental attribute of architectural design, and therefore combining it with CBR may provide significant results both for the field of design thinking as well as for the field of CAAD. This paper focuses on reformulating theoretical foundations for CBR in design by incorporating insights from studies in fields like visual imagery and creativity, where visual reasoning is recognized to play a key role. Within classical CBR research, however, visual reasoning has not received much attention until now. Instead, researchers have concentrated on traditional issues and topics in CBR such as indexing, retrieval and adaptation. The second part of the paper therefore switches attention to how these traditional issues may benefit from integrating Case-Based with visual reasoning.
keywords Case-Based Reasoning, Visual Reasoning, Visual Imagery, Visual Cognition
series eCAADe
email arrro01@techunix.technion.ac.il, ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

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