CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id cdd4
authors Björk, Bo-Christer
year 2001
title Open Source, Open Science, OpenCourseWare
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 13-17
summary The Internet has in just a few years radically changed the technical foundation for how the supply chain of scientific publications and teaching materials functions. As researchers we can with just a few clicks find a significant part of all the information we need for free on the World Wide Web. As teachers we can find huge amounts of digital material which can be downloaded or linked from the web and included in presentation overheads, or hyperlinked as reading material. Yet the business and legal (copyright issues) infrastructure has hardly changed and presents a barrier to innovation and reengineering of the overall process. This paper describes some recent trends in how the Internet influences these two fields (publication of research resuls and production of teaching material) as well as related developments in the organisation of software develop-ment, and discusses them both from an economic and philosophical perspective.
keywords Internet, Scientific Publication, Teaching Material, Open Source
series eCAADe
email bo-christer.bjork@shh.fi
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id c207
authors Branzell, Arne
year 1993
title The Studio CTH-A and the Searching Picture
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 129-140
summary What happens during an architect’s search for the best solution? How does he (or she) begin, which tools are chosen, what happens when he comes to a standstill? The activities – sketching, discussions with other people, making models, taking walks to think, visits to the library, etc? What is an ordinary procedure and what is more specific? Do the tools have an impact on the final solution chosen? What happens during periods of no activity? Are they important? In which fields of activities are signs of the searching process to be found? In other words — what is the process of creative thinking for architects? Mikael Hedin and myself at Design Methods, Chalmers University of Technology, have started research into architects’ problem-solving. We have finished a pilot study on a very experienced architect working traditionally, without Cad (”The Bo Cederlöf Case”). We have started preliminary discussions with our second ”Case”, an architect in another situation, who has been working for many years with Cad equipment (Gert Wingårdh). For our next case, we will study a third situation – two or more architects who share the responsibility for the solution and where the searching is a consequence of a dialogue between equal partners. At present, we are preparing a report on theories in and methods for Searching and Creativity. I will give you some results of our work up till now, in the form of ten hypotheses on the searching process. Finally, I would like to present those fields of activity where we have so far found signs of searching. Our approach, in comparison with earlier investigations into searching (the most respected being Arnheim’s study on Picasso’s completion of the Guernica) is to collect and observe signs of searching during the process, not afterwards. We are, to use a metaphor, following in the footsteps of the hunter, recording the path he chooses, what marks he makes, what tools, implements and equipment he uses. For practising architects: a better understanding of what is going on and encouragement to try new ways of searching, for architectural students: better preparation and training for problem solving. It all began while we compared the different objects in our collection of sketches at the Chalmers STUDIO for Visualisation and Communication. (For some years, we have been gathering sketches by Alvar Aalto, Jorn Utzon, Ralph Erskine, Erik and Tore Ahlsén, Lewerenz, Nyrén, Lindroos, Wingårdh and others in a permanent exhibition). We observed similarities in these sketches which allowed us to frame ten hypotheses about the searching process.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
email branzell@arch.chalmers.se
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 63d0
authors Carrara, Gianfranco and Novembri, Gabriele
year 1986
title Constraint-bounded design search
source Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [CAAD Futures Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-408-05300-3] Delft (The Netherlands), 18-19 September 1985, pp. 146-157
summary The design process requires continual checking of the consistency of design choices against given sets of goals that have been fulfilled. Such a check is generally performed by comparing abstract representations of design goals with these of the sought real building objects (RBO) resulting from complex intellectual activities closely related to the designer's culture and to the environment in which he operates. In this chapter we define a possible formalization of such representations concerning the goals and the RBO that are usually considered in the architectural design process by our culture in our environment. The representation of design goals is performed by expressing their objective aspects (requirements) and by defining their allowable values (performance specifications). The resulting system of requirements defines the set of allowable solutions and infers an abstract representation of the sought building objects (BO) that consists of the set of characteristics (attributes and relations) which are considered relevant to represent the particular kind of RBO with respect to the consistency check with design goals. The values related to such characteristics define the performances of the RBO while their set establishes its behaviour. Generally speaking, there is no single real object corresponding to an abstract representation but the whole class of the RBO that are equivalent with respect to the values assumed by the considered characteristics. The more we increase the number of these, as well as their specifications, the smaller the class becomes until it coincides with a single real object - given that the assessed specifications be fully consistent. On the other hand, the corresponding representation evolves to the total prefiguration of the RBO. It is not therefore possible to completely define a BO representation in advance since this is inferred by the considered goals and is itself a result of the design process. What can only be established in advance is that any set of characteristics assumed to represent any RBO consists of hierarchic, topological, geometrical and functional relations among the parts of the object at any level of aggregation (from components to space units, to building units, to the whole building) that we define representation structure (RS). Consequently the RS may be thought as the elementary structures that, by superposition and interaction, set up the abstract representation that best fit with design goals.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id d146
authors He, Jie
year 2001
title CAD Study in Visual Analysis of the Visual Sustainability for China Urban Natural Landscape Planning
source Chinese University of Hong Kong
summary In this thesis a GIS-based CAD system prototype of evaluating visual quality of urban natural landscape environment is presented. This prototype is an indispensable component of the integrative Visual Sustainability research, and offers a calculable and visualizable technique to urban visual natural landscape assessment. This scientific method provides precise data to estimate the visibility of natural landscape in urban construction actuality. Furthermore, it can also work out supporting information for maintaining and protecting valuable visual landscape resources in further planning. Introduction of this methodology intends to improve the natural landscape cooperation in China urban planning through visual protection. Combining with popular CAD software such as AutoCAD and Microstation, the research team uses ArcView GIS software and its 3D Analyst extension to accomplish a set of research procedure, which includes data modification, model making, viewshed and view sensibility analysis. In addition, this system can create simultaneous 3D scenes or hire other information media as reference tools for professional analysis, design consultation and intercommunication. The core technologies of this proposed system are viewshed calculation and overlay analysis. In viewshed analysis, human visual characteristics are simulated by a series of ergonomics parameters of viewpoints. Viewshed of each viewpoint can be calculated into vector data and mapped by polygons identifying which region is visible and which is not. Overlay function of the proposed system is used in visual sensibility analysis to achieve the division of higher visual sensible area which indicates the common visible area from different viewpoints. Additionally, viewshed maps and visual sensibility results can add more information to mark out the areas that can satisfy certain visual parameters such as appropriate visual angle or visual distance. These overlaying results can visualized the visible areas into hierarchical visual perception quality categories in order to define the visual landscape significance of particular planning regions. A case study was operated to evaluate this system. The case is in Zhongshan city, Guangdong Province of China. Jinzishan hill region is the study site that picked by collaborating discussion of research team and the local government. It is located on the edge of urban built-up area. Jinzishan massif is the prominent landscape element of the surrounding environment. There are three topics in Jinzishan visual perception in this paper. The first topic is the visual quality evaluation of the intersections of its surrounding road system. The second is the integrated visual perception of two main roads called Qiwandao and Bo’ailu. Finally is the analysis of the hill skyline visual quality in surrounding area. The analysis results in GIS vector data can be converted into popular data format and combined with other spatial information for practical application. And comments for future urban planning are collected and analyzed by professional responses to the computer-generated information investigation.
keywords Natural Landscaping; Computer-Aided Design; Landscape Architecture; City Planning; Geographic Information Systems
series thesis:MSc
email hejie@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 403a
authors Karstila, K., Björk, B.C. and Hannus, M.
year 1991
title A Conceptual Framework for Design and Construction Information
source The Computer Integrated Future, CIB W78 Seminar. september, 1991. Unnumbered : ill. includes bibliography
summary This paper tries to sketch out a conceptual framework model for design and construction information. This conceptual model is formed by extending the Finnish RATAS building product data model to include also construction activities, resources, costs, organizations, contracts, etc. and relationships between them. The overall conceptual framework model can be used to extract conceptual submodels related to the information needs of particular participants of the construction process. As an example of different views to design and construction information the views of design, cost estimating and production planning discussed in the paper. The framework model can also be used to define the position of traditional classification systems and general databases in the construction information process
keywords construction, product modeling, building, information, design process
series CADline
email bo-christer.bjork@shh.fi
last changed 2003/06/02 12:41

_id 6b05
authors Martens, B., Björk, B.-Chr. and Turk, Z.
year 2002
title Open, Self Organising Repository for Scientific Information Exchange
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 116-120
summary In the paper-based world, CAAD-associations, such as SIGRADI, and scientific publishers aim at getting the right people together and for making sure their work gets distributed to their peers. Electronic networks, such as the Internet, are providing scientists with the means to pursue those activities on their own. In this paper we present the goals of an EU project called SciX (Scientific information eXchange). The goal of is this project is to analyze the business processes of scientific publishing, to invent new publication models and through a series of pilots to demonstrate how this should work. In the envisioned scenarios, professional associations such as SIGRADI play an important role.
keywords Scientific Knowledge Management, Retrospective CAAD Research, CAADrelated Publications, Web-based Bibliographic Database, Machine Learning
series SIGRADI
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at; bo-christer.bjork@shh.fi; ziga.turk@itc.fgg.uni-lj.si
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id acadia08_038
id acadia08_038
authors Roche, Francois; Stephanie Lavaux; Benoit Durandin; Stephan Henrich
year 2008
title BI[r]O-BO[o]T Ecosophical Apparatus & Skizoïd Machines
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 38-45
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id 4219
authors Wang, Shengwei and Wang, Jin-Bo
year 2002
title Automatic sensor evaluation in BMS commissioning of building refrigeration systems
source Automation in Construction 11 (1) (2002) pp. 59-73
summary A strategy and software is developed to automatically diagnose and evaluate the Building Management Systems (BMS) sensors of building refrigeration systems during commissioning or periodical check (recommissioning). The strategy is based on the first law of thermodynamics (i.e., heat and mass balance of water networks). The strategy evaluates soft sensor faults (biases) by examining and minimizing the weighted sum of the squares of the concerned mass and/or steady state energy balance residuals represented by the corrected measurements over a period, on the basis of the measurements downloaded from BMS. A Genetic Algorithm is employed to determine the global minimal solution to the multimodal objective function, which can be difficult to achieve by traditional gradient-directed search methods. The sensor bias estimates, the confidence intervals of bias estimates and the comparisons of the balance residuals before and after the correction are generated by the software to provide a convenient and reliable means for the engineers to check and diagnose the measurement devices of BMS. The strategy, the software configuration and examples of application are presented in this paper.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

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