CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 9 of 9

_id a8ca
authors Courtieux, Gerard
year 1981
title Man Machine Interface Problems in Computer Aided Architectural Design
source 1981. pp. 231-250 : ill. includes bibliography. -- discussion (pp. 247-250)
summary The author and two other researchers conducted a world-wide survey of existing computer aided architectural design programs in 1978. The purpose of the survey was to validate an earlier study of the architectural design process and to investigate problem areas in Computer Aided Architectural Design (CAAD). The survey indicated that two problems of man machine interaction in CAAD, though partly solved, remain a challenge for computer scientists: the description and graphical representation of three-dimensional objects. The formalization of the information collected in the survey, together with the experience of the author in teaching computer graphics to architecture students for the past ten years, is used to give some insight in these two problems and to make some recommendations for the improvement of the man machine interface in CAAD
keywords architecture, CAD, user interface
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:07

_id eaea2009_drozd_meunier_simonnot_hegron
id eaea2009_drozd_meunier_simonnot_hegron
authors Drozd, Celine; Virginie Meunier, Nathalie Simonnot, Gerard Hegron
year 2011
title What Tools and Modes of Representation to Reflect an Architectural Atmosphere?
source Projecting Spaces [Proceedings of the 9th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 978-3-942411-31-8 ], pp. 77-88
summary During the design phase, the architect is required to create images in order to give a shape to his project and communicate it. These visual representations satisfy architectural codes established over the years. Thus, the architect who wants to make public his creation gives representations of impressions and emotions. This way, the represented atmosphere reveals the designed architecture because it refers to personal experiences by involving our different senses. So, we question ourselves on the ability of images to reflect atmospheres projected by architects. The difficult part is to make visual representations which translate perceptions communicated by all our senses.
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2011/07/05 09:41

_id caadria2019_378
id caadria2019_378
authors Finch, Gerard, Marriage, Guy, Pelosi, Antony and Gjerde, Morten
year 2019
title Experiments in Timber Space Frame Design - Fabrication, Construction and Structural Performance
source M. Haeusler, M. A. Schnabel, T. Fukuda (eds.), Intelligent & Informed - Proceedings of the 24th CAADRIA Conference - Volume 1, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand, 15-18 April 2019, pp. 153-162
summary Digital fabrication makes it possible to create precise and replicable components from engineered timber products. Coupled with strategic design, these tools can be leveraged to produce intelligent and informed jointing conditions that facilitate material arrangements of unprecedented efficiency and strength. This project builds on an existing body of knowledge in the field of digital wood design and fabrication to examine the design, fabrication and structural capabilities of massively modulated plywood space frames. The practice based research finds that while the geometry of a timber space frame is of excellent strength the detailing of joints and overall structural rigidity is a key concern.
keywords CAD / CAM; Digital Wood Design
series CAADRIA
email ged.finch@vuw.ac.nz
last changed 2019/04/16 08:25

_id gerardgabriel_phd
id gerardgabriel_phd
authors Gabriel, Gerard Caesar
year 2000
title COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION IN DESIGN
source PhD Thesis, Faculty of Architecture, University of Sydney
summary Up till now, architects collaborating with other colleagues did so mostly face-to-face (FTF). They had to be in the same space (co-located) at the same time. Communication was ‘spontaneous’ and ideas were represented, whether verbal or nonverbal, by talking and using ‘traditional drawing tools’. If they were geographically displaced, the interaction was then space affected as well as the probability of being time affected. In this case communication was usually mediated through the telephone, and graphically represented ideas were sent by Fax or posted documents. Recently, some architectural firms started using modems and Internet connections to exchange information, by transferring CAD drawings as well as design information, through e-mail and file transfer protocol (FTP). Discussing ideas in architecture, as a more abstract notion, is different from discussing other more concrete arguments using video conferencing. It is more important to ‘see’ what is being discussed at hand than ‘watch’ the other person(s) involved in the discussion. In other words the data being conveyed might be of more importance than the mode of communication. Taking into consideration recent developments in computer and communication technologies this thesis investigates different communication channels utilised in architectural collaboration through Computer Mediated Collaborative Design (CMCD) sessions as opposed to FTF sessions. This thesis investigates the possible effects these different channels have on collaborative design in general and collaborative design communication in particular. We argue that successful CMCD does not necessarily mean emulating close proximity environments. Excluding certain communication channels in a CMCD environment might affect the flow and quantity of synchronous collaborative communication, but not necessarily the quality and content of mutually communicated and represented design ideas. Therefore different communication channels might affect the type of communication and not necessarily the content of the communication. We propose that audio and video are not essential communication channels in CMCD environments. We posit that architects will collaborate and communicate design representations effectively although with some differences, since those two channels might cause interruptions and successful collaborative sessions can take place without them. For this purpose we conducted twenty-four one-hour experiments involving final year architecture students all working to the same design brief. The experiments were divided into three categories, FTF, full computer mediated collaborative design sessions (CMCD-a; audio-video conferencing plus whiteboard as a shared drawing space) and limited computer mediated collaborative design sessions (CMCD-b; with Lambda MOO used as a chat medium plus whiteboard as a shared drawing space). The experiments were video and audio taped, transcribed and coded into a custom developed coding scheme. The results of the analysed coded data and observations of the videotapes provided evidence that there were noticeable differences between the three categories. There was more design communication and less communication control in the CMCD-b category compared to the FTF and CMCD-a categories. Verbal communication became shorter and straight to the point in CMCD-b as opposed to spontaneous non-stop chat in the other two categories. Moreover in CMCD-b the subjects were observed to be more reflective as well as choosing and re-examining their words to explain ideas to their partners. At times they were seen scrolling back through the text of the conversation in order to re-analyse or interpret the design ideas at hand. This was impossible in FTF and CMCD-a sessions, since the subjects were more spontaneous and audio representations were lost as soon as they were uttered. Also the video channel in the CMCD-a category was ignored and hardly used except for the first few minutes of the experiments, for a brief exchange of light humour on the appearance of each subject. The results obtained from analysing the experiments helped us conclude that different communication channels produce different collaborative environments. The three categories of communication for architectural collaboration explored in our experiments are indicative of the alternatives available to architects now. What is not clear to architects is why they would choose one category over another. We propose that each category has its own strengths and difficulties for architectural collaboration, and therefore should be selected on the basis of the type of communication considered to be most effective for the stage and tasks of the design project.
series thesis:PhD
type normal paper
email gerard.gabriel@usyd.edu.au
last changed 2005/09/09 11:02

_id 2205
authors Gabriel, Gerard Cesar and Maher, Mary Lou
year 2002
title Coding and modelling communication in architectural collaborative design
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 199-211
summary Although there has been some research done on collaborative face-to-face (FTF) and video-conferencing sessions involving architects, little is known about the effects these different media have on collaborative design in general and on collaborative communication and design representation in particular. In this paper, we argue that successful computer-mediated collaborative design (CMCD) does not necessarily mean emulating close-proximity environments. In order to investigate this view, we carried out experiments examining the effect and significance of different communication channels in collaborative sessions between architects. The experiments were conducted in different environments and classified into three categories. The first category is FTF. The second, CMCD sessions with full communication channels, CMCD-a. The third category was conducted also through CMCD sessions but with limited communication channels, CMCD-b. A custom coding scheme is developed using data, external and theoretically derived coding categories as a base. Examples of how the proposed coding scheme works are given from all three categories of experiments. The coding scheme provides the basis for modelling and understanding communication in collaborative design.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 2995
authors Gabriel, Gerard Cesar and Maher, Mary Lou
year 1999
title Coding and Modelling Communication in Architectural Collaborative Design
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 152-166
summary Although there has been some research done on collaborative face-to-face (FTF) and video-conferencing sessions involving architects, little is know about the effects these different mediums have on collaborative design in general and collaborative communication and design representation in particular. In this paper we argue that successful computer-mediated collaborative design (CMCD) does not necessarily mean emulating close proximity environments. In order to investigate this view, we carried out experiments examining the effect and significance of different communication channels in collaborative sessions between architects. The experiments were conducted in different environments and classified into three categories. The first category is FTF. The second computer mediated collaborative design sessions with full communication channels CMCD-a. The third category was conducted also through computer mediated collaborative design sessions but with limited communication channels CMCD-b. A custom coding scheme is developed using data, external and theoretically derived coding categories as a base. Examples of how the proposed coding scheme works are given from all three categories of experiments. The coding scheme provides the basis for modeling and understanding communication in collaborative design.
series ACADIA
email gerard@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id a5c8
authors Smulevich, Gerard
year 1993
title CAD in the Design Studio: The Discovery of Inhabitation
source Education and Practice: The Critical Interface [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-02-0] Texas (Texas / USA) 1993, pp. 39-53
summary The impact of CAD on the design process itself has to date been negligible. The vast majority of architects using information technology in the design of buildings have been either job-trained, viewing CAD as an optimization tool, or educated in academic programs where CAD is treated as a specialized subject, isolated from the core design studios and allowing for the perpetuation of manufacturing/ systems based ideologies which have changed very little over the last century. The tragedy is that this is happening while the design studios themselves explore vastly more complex and contemporary issues highlighted by the works of architecture's avantgard. The result is a constant, perverse repetition of arcane, industrial-age processes spilling over into information-age environments, constituting a misuse of the electronic medium; one that could offer the possibility of restating conceptual spatial exploration by its own definition and enabling students and by extension the profession to envision and test the design of the built environment from its most essential aspect, that of inhabitation. There is a synthetic chunk of universe at our fingertips where we can explore space not as an abstraction but as a phenomenological experience, allowing us to exercise our freedom to move and possibly regain our condition of Modernity.

series ACADIA
email gerard_smulevich@hotmail.com
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id 6058
authors Smulevich, Gerard
year 1994
title The Electronic Bauhaus
source Reconnecting [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-03-9] Washington University (Saint Louis / USA) 1994, pp. 197-208
summary This paper describes the use of electronic space in a fourth year undergraduate architectural design studio. It attempts to address the importance of developing a design process that is redefined by the use of computing, integrating concept and perception. This goal is set in the studio exercise, an international student design competition to design an addition to the school of architecture at the original Bauhaus/Weimar. The studio involved re-evaluating the Bauhaus principles of integrating the artist and the craftsman, but in contemporary or post-industrial terms. In 1989 the Wall came down. Seamless access of western telecommunications and media became greatly responsible for the crumbling of the rigid machine-age soviet technocracy; and with it, the former east German city of Weimar, home to the first Bauhaus, was once again a living part of architectural history. When the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture announced an international student competition to design a new addition to the school of architecture at the original Bauhaus/Weimar, we immediately decided that this should be an Electronic Bauhaus.
series ACADIA
email gerard_smulevich@hotmail.com
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id c6e1
authors Smulevich, Gerard
year 1997
title Berlin-Crane City: Cardboard, Bits, and the Post-industrial Design Process
source Design and Representation [ACADIA ‘97 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-06-3] Cincinatti, Ohio (USA) 3-5 October 1997, pp. 139-153
summary This paper explores the impact of information technology on the architectural design process as seen through different design studios from three schools of architecture in Southern California over a two year period.

All three studios tested notions of representation, simulation and the design process in relation to a post-industrial world and its impact on how we design for it. The sites for two of these studios were in the city of Berlin, where the spearhead of the information age and a leftover of the industrial revolution overlap in an urban condition that is representative of our world after the cold war. The three studios describe a progressive shift in the use of information technology in the design process, from nearly pure image-driven simulation to a more low-tech, highly creative uses of everyday computing tools. Combined, all three cases describe an array of scenarios for content-supportive uses of digital media in a design studio. The first studio described here, from USC, utilized computer modeling and visualization to design a building for a site located within the former no-mans' land of the Berlin Wall. The second studio, from SCI-Arc, produced an urban design proposal for an area along the former Berlin Wall and included a pan-geographic design collaboration via Internet between SCI-Arc/Los Angeles and SCI-Arc/Switzerland. The third and last studio from Woodbury University participated in the 1997 ACSA/Dupont Laminated Glass Competition designing a consulate general for Germany and one for Hong Kong. They employed a hybrid digital/non-digital process extracting experiential representations from simple chipboard study models and then using that information to explore an "enhanced model" through digital imaging processes.

The end of the cold war was coincidental with the explosive popularization of information technology as a consumer product and is poised to have huge impact on how and what we design for our cities. Few places in world express this potential as does the city of Berlin. These three undergraduate design studios employed consumer-grade technology in an attempt to make a difference in how we design, incorporating discussions of historical change, ideological premise and what it means to be an architect in a world where image and content can become easily disconnected from one another.

series ACADIA
email gerards@ix.netcom.com
last changed 1998/12/31 12:37

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