CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 20

_id 2005_083
id 2005_083
authors Agostinho, Francisco Santos
year 2005
title Architecture as Drawing, Perception and Cognition
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 83-90
summary This work is about realizing that human perception is inherent to architecture. It is an asset and a trait subject to training and development in an empirical way, involving physical and manual action. It cannot be taught literally through convention and logic reasoning. It is a human achievement of great significance built on intellectual and scientific knowledge. It is something, being physical and empirical, that is supported on instrumental procedure. The computer, as a machine and an instrument, does not shorten the empirical experience of manipulation; on the contrary, it enhances J.J. Gibson’s findings about the perception of space in relation to eye and body movement. Being a cybernetic machine the computer may, and shall, evolve, and become perceptive. In order for that to happen, it is important to keep in mind the mechanism of human perception. Through producing a computerized model of a major architectural work, we develop natural knowledge about its physical features and the thought that lies underneath. To be able to use the computer as an instrument provides a user with explicit knowledge about its ways and mechanism that has to be made available. It involves training, which is to a great extent self-explanatory, and also explicit knowledge about the conventions that are being used, such as programming, reasoning and trigonometry.
keywords Visualization; Environmental Simulation; Knowledge Modelling (KM); 3D Modeling
series eCAADe
email franc@fa.utl.pt
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id c05a
authors Bridges, Alan
year 1995
title Design Precedents for Virtual Worlds
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 293-302
summary The usual precedents cited in relation to Cyberspace are William Gibson's book "Neuromancer" and Ridley Scott's film. "Bladerunner". This paper argues that, whilst literature and film are appropriate precedents, there are more suitable sources to refer to when designing virtual worlds. The paper discusses the use of computer modelling in exploring architectonic concepts in three-dimensional space. In doing so it draws on the philosophy of simulation and gives examples from alternative film and literature sources but concludes that one of the most appropriate metaphors is widely available in the form of the television soap opera.
keywords Design Simulation, Space, Time, Virtual Reality
series CAAD Futures
email a.h.bridges@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id f41f
authors Dong, Wei and Gibson, Kathleen
year 1998
title Computer Visualization
source New York
summary This unique guide offers beginning and experienced CAD users a working understanding of 2D and 3D computer graphics within the context of design issues and principles. One primary feature of this book is its integration of several software applications, highlighting AutoDesk and Adobe products. Its focus, however, is on the way CAD enables you and your clients to visualize built environments, explore alternative ideas, and revise design solutions before construction begins. Accessible enough for university courses, this valuable resource is essential to every architect and interior designer who wants to stay current with new technology and remain competitive in the marketplace.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 8f4f
authors Gibson, I., Kvan, Th. and Ling, W.M.
year 2002
title Rapid Prototyping of Architectural Models
source Journal of Rapid Prototyping, 8:2, pp. 91-99
summary The goal of our study was to identify how designers use and communicate early design ideas by using immersive three-dimensional VEs. We set-up a series of experiments including navigation- and perception-tasks; designing in immersive VE; transcription of design; remote communication between design partners and controlled observations. We explored initial intentions of 3D-immersive design schemes; textual descriptions and collaborations within immersive VE. This article describes the outcome of creation; interpretation and communication of architectural design; by using a three-dimensional (3D) maze together with text-based communication in a series of collaborative design experiments. We conducted the first successful attempt of a Joint Design Studio; which uses immersive VE as tool of design and communication between remote partners. We discuss frameworks and factors influencing how architectural students communicate their proposals in an immersive Virtual Environment Design Studio (VeDS); and how this new approach of design studio enables new forms of design expressions.
keywords Rapid Prototyping; Architectural Design
series journal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2002/11/15 17:29

_id 7054
authors Gibson, Ian and Kvan, Thomas
year 2001
title The use of Rapid Prototyping for Architectural Concept Modelling
source Proc. 2nd Annual Conf. on Rapid Technologies, Rapid Product Development Association of South Africa, 14-15 November, 2001, pp. 27-35
summary This paper describes how Rapid Prototyping technology has been integrated into a conceptual design course in the Department of Architecture in The University of Hong Kong. Students have been using this technology for nearly 3 years now and the demand for models and the range and complexity of the models is ever increasing. A number of factors have been found to be of general interest; including the constraints of technology used; the use of colour; material and texture; and applications. Some observations on use of software are also included. As a result of this program; a large research project is now looking into the differences in the teaching of design and conceptual modelling to Architectural and Mechanical Engineering students.
keywords Rapid Prototyping; Architectural Design; Learning
series other
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2002/11/15 17:29

_id 6ec9
authors Gibson, Ian and Kvan, Thomas
year 2002
title The Use of Rapid Prototyping for Architectural Concept Modelling
source SME Technical Paper PE02-222, The Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME), Dearborn, Michigan, USA
summary This paper describes how Rapid Prototyping technology has been integrated into a conceptual design course in the Department of Architecture in The University of Hong Kong. Students have been using this technology for nearly 3 years now and the demand for models and the range and complexity of the models is ever increasing. A number of factors have been found to be of general interest; including the constraints of technology used; the use of colour; material and texture; and applications. Some observations on use of software are also included. As a result of this program; a large research project is now looking into the differences in the teaching of design and conceptual modelling to Architectural and Mechanical Engineering students.
keywords Engineering Design; Architectural Design; Rapid Prototyping
series other
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2002/11/15 17:29

_id dd16
authors Gibson, Kathleen
year 1999
title STUDIO @ CORNELL
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 18-21
summary Unique to the interior design program at Cornell University is a planned pedagogical approach requiring equal emphasis toward manual and digital graphic communication at the freshman level. Prior to 1998, computer-based instruction only occurred at the junior year of study. Recognizing that cultural and symbolic biases against digital media were formally being instituted by curriculum policy, faculty searched for a new perspective. Central to success was the removal of illogically placed boundaries, both mental and physical. In response, students are now encouraged to cultivate a fluid dexterity between traditional and digital methods, at times using various skills concurrently for design analysis and representation (Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7). Course content for DEA115 ranges from basic orthographic drafting, paraline projection, and perspective drawing to color rendering and composition. Students utilize a full range of media: pencil, ink, marker, pastel, AutoCAD, 3DS/ MAX, and Photoshop in this graphics studio. Course meetings total six contact hours per week, constituting a three credit hour class. Assignments are purposefully created to shatter digital myths. For example, instead of a standard, rote drafting exercise, AutoCAD is used to explore design ideas through systemic object manipulation (Figures 8, 9).
series ACADIA
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id ecaade03_427_177_gibson
id ecaade03_427_177_gibson
authors Gibson, Kathleen
year 2003
title Spatial Mapping: Connections between Virtual and Physical Navigation
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 427-432
summary Using Lynch’s (1960) treatise The Image of the City as a model, user navigation of e-retailing web sites was analyzed using defined categories: paths, districts, edges, nodes, and landmarks. Results from this study suggest that elements in the urban landscape and their use by individuals for way finding and legibility may be similar to those necessary for navigating the World Wide Web.
keywords Spatial mapping; way finding; e-retailing; built environment; world wideweb
series eCAADe
email kjg4@cornell.edu
more http://www.humec.cornell.edu/faculty/facultybio.cfm?netid=kjg4&facs=1
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id acadia08_182
id acadia08_182
authors Gibson, Michael; Kevin R. Klinger; Joshua Vermillion
year 2008
title Constructing Information: Towards a Feedback Ecology in Digital Design and Fabrication
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 182-191
summary As strategies evolve using digital means to navigate design in architecture, critical process-based approaches are essential to the discourse. The often complex integration of design, analysis, and fabrication through digital technologies is wholly reliant upon a process-basis necessitating the use of a design feedback loop, which reinforces critical decision-making and challenges the notions of how we produce, visualize, and analyze information in the service of production and assembly. Central to this process-based approach is the effective and innovative integration of information and the interrogation of material based explorations in the making of architecture. This fabrication ‘ecology’ forces designers to engage complexity and accept the unpredictability of emergent systems. It also exposes the process of working to critique and refine feedback loops in light of complex tools, methods, materials, site, and performance considerations. In total, strategies for engaging this ‘ecology’ are essential to accentuate our present understanding of environmental design and theory in relation to digital processes for design and fabrication. ¶ This paper recounts a design/fabrication seminar entitled “Constructing Information” in which architecture students examined an environmental design problem by way of the design feedback loop, where their efforts in applying digital design and fabrication methods were driven explicitly by material and site realities and where their work was executed, installed, and critically explored in situ. These projections raise important questions about how information, complexity, and context overlay and merge, and underscore the critical potential of visual, spatial, and material effects as part of a fabrication-oriented design process.
keywords Digital Fabrication; Ecology; Environment; Feedback; Performance
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

_id b8b9
authors Gibson, W.
year 1984
title Neuromancer
source Victor Gollancz
summary Here is the novel that started it all, launching the cyberpunk generation, and the first novel to win the holy trinity of science fiction: the Hugo Award, the Nebula Award and the Philip K. Dick Award. With Neuromancer, William Gibson introduced the world to cyberspace--and science fiction has never been the same. Case was the hottest computer cowboy cruising the information superhighway--jacking his consciousness into cyberspace, soaring through tactile lattices of data and logic, rustling encoded secrets for anyone with the money to buy his skills. Then he double-crossed the wrong people, who caught up with him in a big way--and burned the talent out of his brain, micron by micron. Banished from cyberspace, trapped in the meat of his physical body, Case courted death in the high-tech underworld. Until a shadowy conspiracy offered him a second chance--and a cure--for a price....
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id faf7
authors Greer, R., Haas, C., Gibson, G., Traver, A. and Tucker, R.L.
year 1997
title Advances in control systems for construction manipulators
source Automation in Construction 6 (3) (1997) pp. 193-203
summary Fundamental advances in sensors, actuators, and control systems technology are creating opportunities to improve the performance of traditional construction equipment. New capabilities are being developed as well. These improvements in performance and new capabilities are resulting in better safety and efficiency. However, selecting control strategies can be confusing, and measuring and predicting their performance can be difficult. This paper identifies emerging control paradigms and describes methods for measuring their performance. Many control schemes and corresponding example applications are identified, including single degree of freedom control sticks, multiple degree of freedom joysticks, operating and safety constraints, teach/learn capability, resolved motion with internal and external sensors, spatially correspondent controllers, tele-operation, graphical programming and control, and autonomous controls. Methods described for measuring performance are based on American National Standard Institute (ANSI) standard tests, applications analysis, and ergonomics. Examples focus on the University of Texas at Austin's large scale hydraulic manipulator (LSM) and Automated Road Maintenance Machine (ARMM) with the results of performance tests on these manipulators being presented.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 26b4
authors Harfman, Anton and Frazer, Michael J. (Eds.)
year 1994
title Reconnecting [Conference Proceedings]
source ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-03-9 / Washington University (Saint Louis / USA) 1994, 232 p.
summary This book captures and binds disparate streams of information in a single volume and attempts to reconnect us to the experience of architecture through holding a book in our hands. Just as architecture uses the connections among the dissimilar as the sites for design intervention and invention, the content of this book attempts to connect the objective processes that are characteristic of computers with the subjective processes that are characteristic of creativity. The chosen format juxtaposes technical work in the first half with pedagogical explorations in the second half. By recognizing their differences and separating them from each other, the process of reconnecting can occur. Within both the technical and pedagogical sections, a continuous stream of information connects the papers across the bottom of the page. Against the technical papers, we have placed the keynote paper by Professor Paul Laseau. Against the pedagogical papers, we have placed a drawing done by Trent Tesch that is a visual interpretation of cyberspace based on the novel, Neuromancer, by William Gibson. While turning these pages, consider the accidents that take place through the juxtaposition of streams of thought sharing a single page.
series ACADIA
email anton.harfmann@uc.edu
more http://www.acadia.org
last changed 1999/03/29 07:34

_id caadria2006_363
id caadria2006_363
authors HSIAO-CHEN YOU, SHANG-CHIA CHIOU, YI-SHIN DENG
year 2006
title DESIGN BY ACTIONS: An Affordance-based Modeling System in Spatial Design
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 363-369
summary From the viewpoint of interaction design, Gibson's affordance concept is interpreted as an emergent action possibility of the physical human-environment-system, which consists of three key components: the user, the environment, and the possible actions. It could help user to perform the suitable action within an artificial environment. This study aims to develop a formal description of affordance in spatial design. Using the formal description as groundwork, an affordance-based modeling system is then proposed to facilitate its further implementation in design and elucidate the new role of users and designers in spatial design. A simplified sink area design is used as an example to illustrate how this affordance-based modeling system works. For users of different conditions, different spatial arrangements in design will affect the performance and users’ behavior as well. This study demonstrates how design by action can be achieved, and then simulates the action sequence of different design solutions to evaluate the system performance.
series CAADRIA
email hcyou@ntit.edu.tw, chiousc@yuntech.edu.tw, ydest@faculty.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id caadria2004_k-1
id caadria2004_k-1
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.
year 2004
title CONTEXTUALIZATION AND EMBODIMENT IN CYBERSPACE
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 5-14
summary The introduction of VRML (Virtual Reality Markup Language) in 1994, and other similar web-enabled dynamic modeling software (such as SGI’s Open Inventor and WebSpace), have created a rush to develop on-line 3D virtual environments, with purposes ranging from art, to entertainment, to shopping, to culture and education. Some developers took their cues from the science fiction literature of Gibson (1984), Stephenson (1992), and others. Many were web-extensions to single-player video games. But most were created as a direct extension to our new-found ability to digitally model 3D spaces and to endow them with interactive control and pseudo-inhabitation. Surprisingly, this technologically-driven stampede paid little attention to the core principles of place-making and presence, derived from architecture and cognitive science, respectively: two principles that could and should inform the essence of the virtual place experience and help steer its development. Why are the principles of place-making and presence important for the development of virtual environments? Why not simply be content with our ability to create realistically-looking 3D worlds that we can visit remotely? What could we possibly learn about making these worlds better, had we understood the essence of place and presence? To answer these questions we cannot look at place-making (both physical and virtual) from a 3D space-making point of view alone, because places are not an end unto themselves. Rather, places must be considered a locus of contextualization and embodiment that ground human activities and give them meaning. In doing so, places acquire a meaning of their own, which facilitates, improves, and enriches many aspects of our lives. They provide us with a means to interpret the activities of others and to direct our own actions. Such meaning is comprised of the social and cultural conceptions and behaviors imprinted on the environment by the presence and activities of its inhabitants, who in turn, ‘read’ by them through their own corporeal embodiment of the same environment. This transactional relationship between the physical aspects of an environment, its social/cultural context, and our own embodiment of it, combine to create what is known as a sense of place: the psychological, physical, social, and cultural framework that helps us interpret the world around us, and directs our own behavior in it. In turn, it is our own (as well as others’) presence in that environment that gives it meaning, and shapes its social/cultural character. By understanding the essence of place-ness in general, and in cyberspace in particular, we can create virtual places that can better support Internet-based activities, and make them equal to, in some cases even better than their physical counterparts. One of the activities that stands to benefit most from understanding the concept of cyber-places is learning—an interpersonal activity that requires the co-presence of others (a teacher and/or fellow learners), who can point out the difference between what matters and what does not, and produce an emotional involvement that helps students learn. Thus, while many administrators and educators rush to develop webbased remote learning sites, to leverage the economic advantages of one-tomany learning modalities, these sites deprive learners of the contextualization and embodiment inherent in brick-and-mortar learning institutions, and which are needed to support the activity of learning. Can these qualities be achieved in virtual learning environments? If so, how? These are some of the questions this talk will try to answer by presenting a virtual place-making methodology and its experimental implementation, intended to create a sense of place through contextualization and embodiment in virtual learning environments.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
last changed 2004/05/20 16:37

_id 8ec5
authors Kvan, Th., Gibson, I. and Ling, W.M.
year 2001
title RAPID PROTOTYPING FOR ARCHITECTURAL MODELS
source Euro RP 10th European Conference on Rapid Prototyping and Manufacturing, Paris, France, June 7-8, 2001, 9 p.
summary Rapid prototyping (RP) technology has developed as a result of the requirements of manufacturing industry. There are a number of other application areas where RP has been used to good effect and one of these is architectural modelling. However; such application areas often have different requirements from what is offered by the current technology. This paper describes work carried out by the authors to investigate potential applications for architectural modelling; as well as an attempt to explore the limits of the technology. It will go on to discuss how the technology may be developed to better serve the requirements of architects.
keywords Rapid Prototyping; Architectural Design; Learning
series other
type normal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2005/08/06 05:51

_id 5f69
authors Kvan, Th., Gibson, I. and Ming, L.W.
year 2000
title Rapid Prototyping for Architectural Models
source ECPPM2000 – Product and Process Modelling in Building and Construction, Lisbon, Portugal, Balkema Publishers, September 25-27, 2000, pp. 351-359
summary Rapid prototyping (RP) technology has developed as a result of the requirements of manufacturing industry. There are a number of other application areas where RP has been used to good effect and one of these is architectural modelling. However; such application areas often have different requirements from what is offered by the current technology. This paper describes work carried out by the authors to investigate potential applications for architectural modelling; as well as an attempt to explore the limits of the technology. It will go on to discuss how the technology may be developed to better serve the requirements of architects.
keywords Rapid Prototyping; Architectural Design
series other
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2002/11/15 17:29

_id 5c07
authors Lee, H.-L., Liu, Y.-T., Chen, S.-C., Tang, S.-K. and Huang, C.-P., Huang, C.-H., Chang, Y.-L., Chang, K.-W. and Chen, K.-Y.
year 2002
title A Comparative study of protocol analysis for - Spatiality of a Text-based Cyberspace
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 262-266
summary Graduate Institute of Architecture, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 30050, TAIWAN The adaptation of the word cyberspace (Gibson, 1984) following the emergence of the World Wide Web Internet not only succinctly revolutionized the correlation of time and space but also poised to challenge how we view the existing spatial concept. This research tries to use protocol analysis to examine text-based cyberspace, such as bulletin board, chart rooms and so forth, and the objective of this research is to realize the spatiality of cyberspace through the cognitive point of view, and to compare the differences of the definitions and perception ways of spatiality between people with general domain and in design fields. Finally, we validate the existence of cyberspace, where the process not only allows further categorization of spatial elements concluded from the earlier study, but discover that varied backgrounds can affect how a user defines and perceives cyberspace (Strate, 1999).
series eCAADe
email aleppo@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id caadria2006_629
id caadria2006_629
authors MICHAEL A. AMBROSE
year 2006
title VERTICALITY AND HORIZONTALITY. FROM THE PANTHEON TO THE PLAYSTATION, SPATIAL EXPERIENCE AND THE HUMAN BODY IN ARCHITECTURE
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 629-631
summary This research seeks to question the assumed relationship between perspectival projection and architecture as means of investigation, representation and ultimately re-presentation of architectural idea and spatial experience. Spatial experience is primarily a product of corporeal sensation. The human body, as the site of experience reveals a conceptual contradiction between our innate senses and learned perceptions (Gibson, 1966). Verticality and horizontality are abstract conceptual and perceptual constructs used simultaneously in human sensory systems to locate one in space and time. The spatial experience as generated from, and translated by, the human body through visual sensory perception is the focus of the work that looks at first, second and third person spatial experience in architecture and architectural representation. As society continues on the path of further cybernetic extension of the body’s sense-image, the context and spatial/visual literacy of the ‘learned’ sense of space-time will continue to evolve, transform and alter as cultures stretch to engage both edges of the physical and virtual worlds. Vitruvius articulated the human experience (and the subsequent expression of architecture) as inherently a vertical one.
series CAADRIA
email ambrosem@umd.edu
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id 8c88
authors Tweed, Christopher
year 2001
title Highlighting the affordances of designs. Mutual realities and vicarious environments
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 681-696
summary Computer-aided evaluation of predicted design performance is an enduring theme within CAAD research and practice. However, most evaluative systems address aspects of design that are readily amenable to formal or quantitative treatments. Analyses of how people use and interact with designs rarely progress beyond a narrow functionalism, in which ‘the user’ figures as a type with poorly defined needs and characteristics. This paper outlines a theory of actor-environment interaction based on Gibson’s notion of affordance as a precursor to exploring how computers can be used to highlight the affordances of designs. Two simple prototypes are described. The main conclusion is that while computers are unlikely to be able to detect affordances, they can generate and present information in ways that will enable human designers to appreciate more fully the possible implications of their designs for a broader range of potential occupants.
keywords Affordances, Human-Environment Interaction, Design Evaluation, Agents
series CAAD Futures
email c.tweed@qub.ac.uk
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 7b3d
authors Wei, Dong and Gibson, Kathleen
year 1998
title Computer visualization:an integrated approach for interior design and architecture
source McGraw-Hill
summary This unique guide offers beginning and experienced CAD users a working understanding of 2D and 3D computer graphics within the context of design issues and principles. One primary feature of this book is its integration of several software applications, highlighting AutoDesk and Adobe products. Its focus, however, is on the way CAD enables you and your clients to visualize built environments, explore alternative ideas, and revise design solutions before construction begins. Accessible enough for university courses, this valuable resource is essential to every architect and interior designer who wants to stay current with new technology and remain competitive in the marketplace
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

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