CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 241

_id ascaad2014_033
id ascaad2014_033
authors Al-Mousa , Sukainah Adnan
year 2014
title Temporary Architecture: An urban mirage
source Digital Crafting [7th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2014 / ISBN 978-603-90142-5-6], Jeddah (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia), 31 March - 3 April 2014, pp. 405-413
summary One of the emerging multidisciplinary contemporary art practices is interactive installation art, which is concerned with constructing a temporary artistic environment that is digital, responsive and engaging. It is usually displayed within existing architectural context whether indoor in a gallery space or outdoor in a public space. Recent examples of such art projects show that interactivity and illusion are effectively present and highly influential in the perception and memory of the place. A digital display on a building façade can remain attached to the history of the site in the spectator’s memory even after the display is removed. An interactive space that involves body response and emotional sensory interaction can determine the narrative perceived from the experience. These trends seemingly bring together the physical context and the digital space to contain the spectator. The two mediums are merged to provide a new genre of space, hence a new mode of perception where the art space mediates people’s movement and overlay the context with new meanings. Multiple backgrounds are involved in the creative process of interactive installation art, all of which involve examining various concepts through artistic engagement with temporary spaces. Here, particularly because of interactivity and immerseveness, the spectator becomes part of the performance (the subject); with his moving and reacting he activates the narrative and probably gives it its shape. This paper aims to explore the potentials of the digital spatial display to enhance or weaken our sense of belonging to the surrounding environments while creating an illusionary space within the real physical one. It also aims to discuss how this influence would affect the memory of the mixed experience; the installation being digital, temporary and illusive and the space being physical, permanent and real. What happens to the “spectator” when contained by the digital-interactive and the physical medium(s)?. In order to unfold the mentioned questions, the study uses theories of perception and performance reflected on live case studies of recent art projects where the researcher becomes a member of the audience and an observer at the same time in order to trace the journey inside this new medium. In an era where time is being more difficult to grasp and identities of visual culture is becoming more difficult to define, temporary responsive environments can provide some openings where space becomes durational, yet, influential, and where people’s movements become more meaningful in the visual terrain.
series ASCAAD
email s.almousa@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 2016/02/15 12:09

_id avocaad_2001_18
id avocaad_2001_18
authors Aleksander Asanowicz
year 2001
title The End of Methodology - Towards New Integration
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The present paper is devoted to the deliberation on the genesis and development of designing from the point of view of the potential use of computers in the process. Moreover, it also presents the great hopes which were connected with the use of the systematic designing methods in the 1960’s, as well as the great disappointment resulting from the lack of concrete results. At this time a great deal of attention was paid to the process of design as a branch of a wider process of problem-solving. Many people believed that the intuitive methods of design traditionally used by architects were incapable of dealing with the complexity of the problems to be solved. Therefore, the basic problem was the definition of a vertical structure of the designing process, which would make it possible to optimise each process of architectural design. The studies of design methodology directed at the codification of the norms of actions have not brought about any solutions which could be commonly accepted, as the efforts to present the designing process as a formally logical one and one that is not internally “uncontrary” from the mathematical point of view, were doomed to fail. Moreover, the difficulties connected with the use of the computer in designing were caused by the lack of a graphic interface, which is so very characteristic of an architect’s workshop. In result, the methodology ceased to be the main area of the architect’s interest and efforts were focused on facilitating the method of the designer’s communication with the computer. New tools were created, which enabled both the automatic generation of diversity and the creation of forms on the basis of genetic algorithms, as well as the presentation of the obtained results in the form of rendering, animation and VRML. This was the end of the general methodology of designing and the beginning of a number of methods solving the partial problems of computer-supported design. The present situation can be described with the words of Ian Stewart as a “chaotic run in all directions”. An immediate need for new integration is felt. Cyber-real space could be a solution to the problem. C-R-S is not a virtual reality understood as an unreal world. Whilst VR could be indeed treated as a sort of an illusion, C-R-S is a much more realistic being, defining the area in which the creative activities are taking place. The architect gains the possibility of having a direct contact with the form he or she is creating. Direct design enables one to creatively use the computer technology in the designing process. The intelligent system of recognising speech, integrated with the system of virtual reality, will allow to create an environment for the designer – computer communication which will be most natural to the person. The elimination of this obstacle will facilitate the integration of the new methods into one designing environment. The theoretical assumptions of such an environment are described in the present paper.
series AVOCAAD
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id bba7
authors Alexander, Christopher W.
year 1964
title Notes on the Synthesis of Form
source Harvard Graduate School of Design
summary Every design problem begins with an effort to achieve fitness between two entities: the form in question and its context. The form is the solution to the problem; the context defines the problem. We want to put the context and the form into effortless contact or frictionless coexistence, i.e., we want to find a good fit. For a good fit to occur in practice, one vital condition must be satisfied. It must have time to happen. In slow-changing, traditional, unselfconscious cultures, a form is adjusted soon after each slight misfit occurs. If there was good fit at some stage in the past, no matter how removed, it will have persisted, because there is an active stability at work. Tradition and taboo dampen and control the rate of change in an unselfconscious culture's designs. It is important to understand that the individual person in an unselfconscious culture needs no creative strength. He does not need to be able to improve the form, only to make some sort of change when he notices a failure. The changes may not always be for the better; but it is not necessary that they should be, since the operation of the process allows only the improvements to persist. Unselfconscious design is a process of slow adaptation and error reduction. In the unselfconscious process there is no possibility of misconstruing the situation. Nobody makes a picture of the context, so the picture cannot be wrong. But the modern, selfconscious designer works entirely from a picture in his mind - a conceptualization of the forces at work and their interrelationships - and this picture is almost always wrong. To achieve in a few hours at the drawing board what once took centuries of adaptation and development, to invent a form suddenly which clearly fits its context - the extent of invention necessary is beyond the individual designer. A designer who sets out to achieve an adaptive good fit in a single leap is not unlike the child who shakes his glass-topped puzzle fretfully, expecting at one shake to arrange the bits inside correctly. The designer's attempt is hardly as random as the child's is; but the difficulties are the same. His chances of success are small because the number of factors which must fall simultaneously into place is so enormous. The process of design, even when it has become selfconscious, remains a process of error-reduction. No complex system will succeed in adapting in a reasonable amount of time or effort unless the adaptation can proceed component by component, each component relatively independent of the others. The search for the right components, and the right way to build the form up from these components, is the greatest challenge faced by the modern, selfconscious designer. The culmination of the modern designer's task is to make every unit of design both a component and a system. As a component it will fit into the hierarchy of larger components that are above it; as a system it will specify the hierarchy of smaller components of which it itself is made.
series thesis:PhD
email services@patternlanguage.com
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id sigradi2016_615
id sigradi2016_615
authors Almeida , Rafael Goffinet de; Santos, Fábio Lopes Souza
year 2016
title Um olhar sobre a relação entre sujeitos e meios técnicos: O público como construção social mediada [Looking at the relationship between subjects and technical means: The audience as mediated social construction]
source SIGraDi 2016 [Proceedings of the 20th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-956-7051-86-1] Argentina, Buenos Aires 9 - 11 November 2016, pp.872-879
summary This article analyses some of the proposals produced in the late 1970´s by the American contemporary artist Dan Graham, in which he uses technical means to investigate the audience´s perception and behavior. The questions raised highlight reciprocity phenomena and identity constructions – factors that affect our experience and behavior in contemporary cities daily life. All of these issues derive from Graham´s investigations of the main information and communication technologies (media) produced at that time, and which continue to offer reflections on current relationship between technical means and the subject – that is, his/her condition as audience, observer, spectator or user.
keywords Dan Graham; Contemporary art; Contemporary Architecture and City; Technical means; Contemporary spatiality
series other
type normal paper
email rafael.goffinet.almeida@usp.br
last changed 2017/06/21 12:49

_id 1a52
authors Amor, R., Augenbroe, G., Hosking, J., Rombouts and W., Grundy, J.
year 1995
title Directions in modelling environments
source Automation in Construction 4 (3) (1995) pp. 173-187
summary Schema definition is a vital component in the computerised A/E/C projects. existing tools to manage this task are limited both in terms of the scope Of problems they can tackle and their integration with each other. This paper describes a global modellling and development environment for large modelling projects. This environment provides a total solution from initial design of schemas to validation, manipulation arid navigation through final models. A major benefit of the described system is the ability to provide multiple views of evolving schemas (or models) in both graphical and textual forms This allows modellers to visualise their schemas and instance models either textually or graphically as desired. The system automatically maintains the Conisistency of the informalion in these views even when modifications are made in other views. Simple and intuitive view navigation methods allow required information to he rapidly accessed. The environment supports strict checking of model instances and schemas in one of the major ISO-standardised modelling languages no used in product data technology. Ill this paper we show how such a modelling environment has been constructed for evaluation in the JOULE founded COMBINE project.
keywords Modelling Environment; Consistency; Multiple Views: Views; Building Models; Information Management; Integrated System; Product Modelling
series journal paper
email trebor@cs.auckland.ac.nz
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 12:33

_id ga9922
id ga9922
authors Annunziato, M. and Pierucci, P.
year 1999
title The Art of Emergence
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Since several years, the term emergence is mentioned in the paradigm of chaos and complexity. Following this approach, complex system constituted by multitude of individual develop global behavioral properties on the base of local chaotic interactions (self-organization). These theories, developed in scientific and philosophical milieus are rapidly spreading as a "way of thinking" in the several fields of cognitive activities. According to this "way of thinking" it is possible revise some fundamental themes as the economic systems, the cultural systems, the scientific paths, the communication nets under a new approach where nothing is pre-determined, but the global evolution is determined by specific mechanisms of interaction and fundamental events (bifurcation). With a jump in scale of the life, also other basic concepts related to the individuals as intelligence, consciousness, psyche can be revised as self-organizing phenomena. Such a conceptual fertility has been the base for the revision of the artistic activities as flexible instruments for the investigation of imaginary worlds, metaphor of related real worlds. In this sense we claim to the artist a role of "researcher". Through the free exploration of new concepts, he can evoke qualities, configurations and hypothesis which have an esthetical and expressive value and in the most significant cases, they can induce nucleation of cultural and scientific bifurcation. Our vision of the art-science relation is of cooperative type instead of the conflict of the past decades. In this paper we describe some of the most significant realized artworks in order to make explicit the concepts and basic themes. One of the fundamental topics is the way to generate and think to the artwork. Our characterization is to see the artwork not as a static finished product, but as an instance or a dynamic sequence of instances of a creative process which continuously evolves. In this sense, the attention is focused on the "generative idea" which constitutes the envelop of the artworks generable by the process. In this approach the role of technology (computers, synthesizers) is fundamental to create the dimension of the generative environment. Another characterizing aspect of our artworks is derived by the previous approach and specifically related to the interactive installations. The classical relation between artist, artwork and observers is viewed as an unidirectional flux of messages from the artist to the observer through the artwork. In our approach artist, artwork and observer are autonomous entities provided with own personality which jointly intervene to determine the creative paths. The artist which generate the environment in not longer the "owner" of the artwork; simply he dialectically bring the generative environment (provided by a certain degree of autonomy) towards cultural and creative "void" spaces (not still discovered). The observers start from these platforms to generate other creative paths, sometimes absolutely unexpected , developing their new dialectical relations with the artwork itself. The results derived by these positions characterize the expressive elements of the artworks (images, sequences and sounds) as the outcomes of emergent behavior or dynamics both in the sense of esthetical shapes emergent from fertile generative environments, either in terms of emergent relations between artist, artwork and observer, either in terms of concepts which emerge by the metaphor of artificial worlds to produce imaginary hypothesis for the real worlds.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ga9926
id ga9926
authors Antonini, Riccardo
year 1999
title Let's Improvise Together
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The creators of ‘Let's-Improvise-Together’ adhere to the idea that while there is a multitude of online games now available in cyberspace, it appears that relatively few are focused on providing a positive, friendly and productive experience for the user. Producing this kind of experience is one the goals of our Amusement Project.To this end, the creation of ‘Let's Improvise Together’ has been guided by dedication to the importance of three themes:* the importance of cooperation,* the importance of creativity, and* the importance of emotion.Description of the GameThe avatar arrives in a certain area where there are many sound-blocks/objects. Or he may add sound "property" to existing ones. He can add new objects at will. Each object may represents a different sound, they do not have to though. The avatar walks around and chooses which objects he likes. Makes copies of these and add sounds or change the sounds on existing ones, then with all of the sound-blocks combined make his personalized "instrument". Now any player can make sounds on the instrument by approaching or bumping into a sound-block. The way that the avatar makes sounds on the instrument can vary. At the end of the improvising session, the ‘composition’ will be saved on the instrument site, along with the personalized instrument. In this way, each user of the Amusement Center will leave behind him a unique instrumental creation, that others who visit the Center later will be able to play on and listen to. The fully creative experience of making a new instrument can be obtained connecting to Active Worlds world ‘Amuse’ and ‘Amuse2’.Animated colorful sounding objects can be assembled by the user in the Virtual Environment as a sort of sounding instrument. We refrain here deliberately from using the word musical instrument, because the level of control we have on the sound in terms of rythm and melody, among other parameters, is very limited. It resembles instead, very closely, to the primitive instruments used by humans in some civilizations or to the experience made by children making sound out of ordinary objects. The dimension of cooperation is of paramount importance in the process of building and using the virtual sounding instrument. The instrument can be built on ones own effort but preferably by a team of cooperating users. The cooperation has as an important corolary: the sharing of the experience. The shared experience finds its permanence in the collective memory of the sounding instruments built. The sounding instrument can be seen also as a virtual sculpture, indeed this sculpture is a multimedial one. The objects have properties that ranges from video animation to sound to virtual physical properties like solidity. The role of the user representation in the Virtual World, called avatar, is important because it conveys, among other things, the user’s emotions. It is worth pointing out that the Avatar has no emotions on its own but it simply expresses the emotions of the user behind it. In a way it could be considered a sort of actor performing the script that the user gives it in real-time while playing.The other important element of the integration is related to the memory of the experience left by the user into the Virtual World. The new layout is explored and experienced. The layout is a permanent editable memory. The generative aspects of Let's improvise together are the following.The multi-media virtual sculpture left behind any participating avatar is not the creation of a single author/artist. The outcome of the sinergic interaction of various authors is not deterministic, nor predictable. The authors can indeed use generative algorythm in order to create the texture to be used on the objects. Usually, in our experience, the visitors of the Amuse worlds use shareware programs in order to generate their texture. In most cases the shareware programs are simple fractals generators. In principle, it is possible to generate also the shape of the object in a generative way. Taking into account the usual audience of our world, we expected visitors to use very simple algorythm that could generate shapes as .rwx files. Indeed, noone has attempted to do so insofar. As far as the music is concerned, the availability of shareware programs that allow simple generation of sounds sequences has made possible, for some users, to generate sounds sequences to be put in our world. In conclusion, the Let's improvise section of the Amuse worlds could be open for experimentation on generative art as a very simple entry point platform. We will be very happy to help anybody that for educational purposes would try to use our platform in order to create and exhibit generative forms of art.
series other
email Riccardo.Antonini@UniRoma2.it
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id sigradi2004_257
id sigradi2004_257
authors Antonio Serrato-Combe
year 2004
title Something 's gotta give' architectural animations
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary Architectural animations are like Harry Langer, a fifty-something entertainment mogul played by best actor nominee Jack Nicholson in the film Something.s Gotta Give. They.ve been surrounded by plenty of pathetic spiritless gimmicks. And, like Harry in the film, they have suffered a heart attack. Harry did not die. Architectural animations are still around, barely. Something.s wrong with them. When Harry begins to recover, he.s surprised to find himself growing fond of a woman his own age (played by best actress nominee Dianne Keaton). This is precisely what should happen to architectural animations. They need to come to terms with more mature attitudes and approaches. This paper presents a new and different approach to architectural animations. In ninety nine percent of the cases, architectural animations have been produced at the end of the design process, just when architects or architecture students are ready to present their schemes to an audience or client group. All design decisions have been made. All aspects of the architectural solutions have been set. Tectonic qualities, lighting schemes, construction approaches, everything has been cast in stone. The animation is simply shown as a public relations gesture to broadcast to the audience that the design team is digitally savvy and uses the latest technologies. The proposition contained herein is that animations be used throughout the design process, that is, from beginning to end.
series SIGRADI
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id asanowicz02_paper_eaea2007
id asanowicz02_paper_eaea2007
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander; Katarzyna Asanowicz
year 2008
title The Dynamic Perception of Digitally Created Abstract Urban Space
source Proceedings of the 8th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference
summary Sigmund Freud in his book has used a City as a Metaphor of human Psyche. According to him City is not only images of the forms given us in the process of perception but all invisible and nowadays not existing forms (buildings) too. This way of representing historical sequences is possible thanks to ability of our mind to parallel consideration of different spatial meanings. Aldo Rossi called it - “analogous City” – a city which includes the existing buildings, buildings which was existed in the same place in the past and imaginary buildings (our visions of future development of the city). As a result – City is a place where real and virtual meet. Aldo Rossi presents an “analogous city” as a mental map which includes real and unreal forms representing, at the same time, remembered and imagined events. He has written: “When we back to the place after long absence we not only recognize it, but at the same time start remembering events which has happened at this place in the past. Peter Eisenman in “The City of Artificial Excavation” has analyzed the city as an archaeologist, who excaved forgotten buildings and showed us unknown connections and meanings.
keywords city perception, emotions, digital composition
series EAEA
email asan@pb.bialystok.pl
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id ascaad2014_036
id ascaad2014_036
authors Assassi, Abdelhalim; Belal Taher and Samai Rachida
year 2014
title Intelligent Digital Craft to Recognize Spatial Installations for Residential Designs
source Digital Crafting [7th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2014 / ISBN 978-603-90142-5-6], Jeddah (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia), 31 March - 3 April 2014, pp. 195-196; 443-456
summary Architecture took an evolutionary context over time, where designers were interested in finding pragmatic spontaneous appropriate solutions and met the needs of people in urban and architectural spaces. Whereas, in modern architecture an intense and varied competition happens between architects through various currents of thoughts , schools and movements, however, that creativity was the ultimate goal , and a the same time we find that every architect distinguishes himself individually or collectively through tools of architectural expression and design representation adopting a school of thought, using , for example, the leaves of various sizes and diverse technical drawing tools to accurately show that he can be read by professionals or craftsmen outside the geographical scope to which it belongs .With the rapid technological development which accompanied the digital craft in the contemporary world , The digital craft summed up time, distance and tools , so they gave the concept more appropriate accuracy , as virtualization has become the most effective tool for Architecture To reach the ideal and typical results at the practical level, or pure research. At the level of residential design and on the grounds that housing plays an important role in the government policies and given that housing is a basic unit common to all urban communities on earth , the use of different programs to show its typicality in two dimensions or in the third dimension - for example, using software "AutoCAD " " 3D Max " , " ArchiCAD " ... etc. - gave virtualisation smart, creative and beautiful forms which lead to better understand the used /or to be used residential spaces, and thus the conclusion that the life system of dwelling under design or under study , as can specifically recognize spatial structure in housing design - using digital software applying "Space Syntax" for example - in the shadow of slowly growing digital and creative development with the help of high-speed computers . the morphological structure of the dwelling is considered to be the most important contemporary residential designs Investigation through which the researcher in this area aims to understand the various behavioral relations and social structures within the projected residential area, using Space Syntax techniques. Through the structural morphology of dwellings can be inferred quality networks, levels of connectivity and depth and places of openness or closure within the dwelling under study, or under design. How, then, have intelligently contributed this digital craft to the perception of those spatial fixtures ? The aim of this research is to apply an appropriate program in the field of vernacular residential design and notably Space syntax which relate to the understanding and analysis of spatial structures, and also demonstrate its role at the morphological and spatial structure aspects, and prove how effective it helps to understand the social logic of domestic space through social individual/collective relationships and behaviors projected on the spatial configurations of dwellings. The answer to the issue raised above and at the methodological aspect, the study discussed the application of space syntax techniques on the subject. The findings tend to prove the efficiency by comparing samples of Berber vernacular domestic spaces from the Mzab, the Aures and Kabilya in Algeria, and has also led to ascertain the intelligibility of space syntax techniques in reading the differences between the behaviors in domestic spaces in different areas of the sample through long periods of time .
series ASCAAD
email abdelhalim.assassi@gmail.com
last changed 2016/02/15 12:09

_id 50ce
authors Baker, R.
year 1993
title Designing the Future: The Computer Transformation of Reality
source Thames and Hudson, Hong Kong
summary A coffee table book on computer applications? Well, yes, because it does deal largely with matters of graphic design in architecture, fashion and textiles, painting, and photography; but it also has items which might be of interest in its sections on digital publication, typography, and electronic communication in general. It also seeks to discuss the way in which these applications may force us to change the way we think. Robin Baker writes in an unfortunately stiff and abstract manner about the impact computer programmes have had on the world of art and design, but the graphic images and extended picture captions help to keep the reader awake - even though the main text sometimes disappears for two or three double page spreads on end. There are also smatterings of pretentious art-world-speak about 'solving certain spatial problems' (in the design of curtain fabrics or teapots) and the introduction (inevitable?) of new jargon: 'shape grammar'(a list of so-called shape 'rules'), 'repurposing' (putting somebody else's work to new use) and 'genetic algorithms' (sculptural designs based on re-processed organic shapes - most of which look like stomach tumours). In his favour, Baker very generously credits students and commercial designers who have produced the effects he describes and illustrates so well. For writers, he sketches in the possibilities of Hypertext and Hypermedia and points to the future of Hyper publishing which he (and Rupert Murdoch)believes will be with us before the end of the century. He seems to have a good oversight of what is possible and practicable - though one wonders how up-to-date the view is when his book may have begun its life anything up to three years ago. He usefully points out that much new technology exists in or drags along with it the forms of earlier periods - so that in an age of electronic communication we still have printed books as a dominant cultural form. Maybe this is as it should be - but Baker makes a persuasive case for the claim that All This is Going to Change.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id e118
authors Balas, Egon
year 1983
title Disjunctive Programming and a Hierarchy of Relaxations for Discrete Optimization Problems
source December, 1983. 38 p. : ill. includes bibliography
summary The author discuss a new conceptual framework for the convexification of discrete optimization problems, and a general technique for obtaining approximations to the convex hull of the feasible set. The concepts come from disjunctive programming and the key tool is a description of the convex hull of a union of polyhedra in terms of a higher dimensional polyhedron. Although this description was known for several years, only recently was it shown by Jeroslow and Lowe to yield improved representations of discrete optimization problems. The author expresses the feasible set of a discrete optimization problem as the intersection (conjunction) of unions of polyhedra, and define an operation that takes one such expression into another, equivalent one, with fewer conjuncts. He then introduces a class of relaxations based on replacing each conjunct (union of polyhedra) by its convex hull. The strength of the relaxations increases as the number of conjuncts decreases, and the class of relaxations forms a hierarchy that spans the spectrum between the common linear programming relaxation, and the convex hull of the feasible set itself. Instances where this approach presents advantages include critical path problems in disjunctive graphs, network synthesis problems, certain fixed charge network flow problems, etc. The approach on the first of these problems is illustrated, which is a model for machine sequencing
keywords polyhedra, computational geometry, optimization, programming, convex hull, graphs
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:07

_id 44b1
authors Balas, Egon
year 1984
title On the Facial Structure of Scheduling Polyhedra
source 49 p., 6 p. of appendix : ill. Pittsburgh, PA: Design Research Center, Carnegie Mellon Univ., December, 1984. includes bibliography
summary A well-known job shop scheduling problem can be formulated as follows. Given a graph G with node set N and with directed and undirected arcs, find an orientation of the undirected arcs that minimizes the length of a longest path in G. The author treats the problem as a disjunctive program, without recourse to integer variables, and give a partial characterization of the scheduling polyhedron P(N), i.e., the convex hull of feasible schedules. In particular, he derives all the facets inducing inequalities for the scheduling polyhedron P(K) defined on some clique with node set K, and gives a sufficient condition for such inequalities to also induce facets of P(N). One of our results is that any inequality that induces a facet of P(H) for some HCK, also induces a facet of P(K). Another one is a recursive formula for deriving a facet inducing inequality with p positive coefficients from one with p-1 positive coefficients. The author also addresses the constraint identification problem, and gives a procedure for finding an inequality that cuts off a given solution to a subset of the constraints
keywords polyhedra, graphs, optimization, convex hull
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:07

_id a6d8
authors Baletic, Bojan
year 1992
title Information Codes of Mutant Forms
source CAAD Instruction: The New Teaching of an Architect? [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Barcelona (Spain) 12-14 November 1992, pp. 173-186
summary If we assume that the statements from this quote are true, than we have to ask ourselves the question: "Should we teach architecture as we do?" This paper describes our experience in developing a knowledge base using a neural network system to serve as a "intelligent assistant" to students and other practicing architects in the conceptual phase of their work on housing design. Our approach concentrated on rising the awareness of the designer about the problem, not by building rules to guide him to a solution, but by questioning the categories and typologies by which he classifies and understands a problem. This we achieve through examples containing mutant forms, imperfect rules, gray zones between black and white, that carry the seeds of new solutions.
series eCAADe
email bbaletic@arhitekt.hr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 05f0
authors Ball, A.A.
year 1977
title CONSURF Part 3 : How the Program Is Used
source computer Aided Design. January, 1977. vol. 9: pp. 9-12 : ill. includes bibliography
summary This paper is the last of a series describing the surface lofting program CONSURF, and outlines how the program is used. The overall approach is geometrical and is modeled closely on manual lofting. The program user must have a practical understanding of shape and be able to visualize the surfaces he defines. He must also be numerate, but he does not need to understand the surface mathematics which is confined to the software. In this paper CONSURF, is considered as a production program and the contribution to the user are described
keywords mechanical engineering, curved surfaces, lofting
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id b9d1
authors Barlas, Adnan
year 1987
title STAGED BUILDING IN HIGH RISE HOUSING
source Proceedings of the 1st European Full-Scale Workshop Conference / ISBN 87-88373-20-7 / Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-16 January 1987, pp. 53-56
summary Since 1950s Turkey is experiencing a high rate of urbanization as a result of the inflow of Iarge number of rural immigrants to the urban areas, in addition to the natural urban population growth. This high level of urbanization gave rise to various burdens and problems within the urban areas. One of these problems.and the most important,is seen in the housing sector. The increasing level of housing need of the urban society could not be met by, the available urban housing a stock. Thus, there emerged a different type of production at the fringes of the urban areas, which is called as "squatter"; being completely unauthorized. In addition to the rapid urbanization -he general deficiencies in the Turkish economy have also effected the urban case. The rents and the prices of the dwelling units in the authorized stock increased to such level that, a great portion of the urban households with low and lower middle incomes could not afford to buy or rent a dwelling unit from the authorized stock. The situation is still the same now.
keywords Full-scale Modeling, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 13:07

_id 5cf4
id 5cf4
authors Barrionuevo, Luis F.
year 2004
title LOS "SPIROSPACES"
source Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference of Mathematics & Design, Special Edition of the Journal of Mathematics & Design, Volume 4, No.1, pp. 179-187.
summary This paper deals with “Spirospaces”. These are a conversion to the third dimension of the two dimensional geometric entities called “Spirolaterals”.

Abelson, Harold, diSessa and Andera (1968) gave the first rules concerning Spirolaterals. To obtain a Spirolateral from a set of straight lines, the first of them must be one unit long and the following must be incremented one unit at each step, at the same time that they turn in a constant direction. Odds (1973) establish the variation of the rotation direction, either to the left or the right. However, he did not give a mathematical relation able to calculate open Spirolaterals. Krawczyk (2001) developed a computer program that generates Spirolaterals following the method suggested by Abelson. These are Spirolaterals obtained by enumeration without a predictive mathematical formula. Krawczyc went farther proposing Spirolaterals based in curved lines. He pointed out that there are a variety of spirolateral forms that have architectural potentiality. Following this, the architectural potentiality of Spirolaterals is the basis of this paper.

To take advantage of that potentiality a computer program was implemented to generate spatial configurations based in Spirolaterals. When a third dimension is given to the Spirolaterals they become Spirospaces. These new entities need spatial and design parameters to be useful for architectural purposes. Barrionuevo and Borsetti (2001) gave results about that work establishing the concept of Spirospaces.

The aim of this paper is to describe a work directed to improve rules and procedures concerning Spirospaces. It is expected that these procedures governed by the proposed rules can be employed as tools during the early steps in the architectural design process.

In this work some aspects concerning Spirospaces are considered. First, Spirolaterals are presented as the predecessors of Spirospaces. Second, Spirospaces are defined, together with their structural parameters. Architectural modeling is studied at the light of two special elements of the Spirospaces: Interstitial spaces and Object spaces. Next, a computer program is presented as the appropriate tool to model configurations having architectural potentiality. Finally, the results obtained running the computer program are analyzed to determine their possible use as architectural forms. Several graphic illustrations are presented showing steps going from the exploration of spatial alternatives to the selection of a specific configuration to be developed.

It is expected that the described computer program could be employed as a design aid tool. As the operation of the program generates a variety of spaces able to dwell architectural objects, it eases the search of configurations suitable to specific functions. The results obtained have the possibility of being exported to computer graphic applications able to add materials, lights and cameras.

keywords Spirolaterals, Spirospaces, architectural spaces, interstitial spaces, objectual spaces
series other
type normal paper
email labsist@hotmail.com
last changed 2005/04/07 13:34

_id 6fb3
authors Bemergui Holcblat, Jeanette and Ortega Díaz - Arias, Félix
year 2001
title Usabilidad: su incorporación en la formación de los diseñadores de sitios web eficaces [Usability: Its Incorporation In the Creation of the Efficient Web Designers]
source 2da Conferencia Venezolana sobre Aplicación de Computadores en Arquitectura, Maracaibo (Venezuela) december 2001, pp. 184-193
summary To design in the user's function has become the fundamental key to achieve the effectiveness of a Web site. This work is guided to approach a key and fundamental concept to guarantee the success of a design for a web site that is the "usability". It is presented in first term the basic concepts of the usability, the importance of the establishment of some principles based on the usability engineering. In a second he/she leaves they will expose some guidelines, rules and methods that he/she offers this technique and that they constitute the essence of the design centered in users. some of the keys of the usability methods will be described.
keywords Web Site; Usability; Design
series other
email jennybemergui@terra.es, flodar@airtel.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id acadia14projects_07
id acadia14projects_07
authors Bieg, Kory
year 2014
title Caret 6
source ACADIA 14: Design Agency [Projects of the 34th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 9789126724478]Los Angeles 23-25 October, 2014), pp. 07-10
summary Caret 6 in an installation and exhibition designed and curated by Kory Bieg and his students from the University of Texas at Austin Studio he taught in the fall of 2013. The installation supports prototypes and the winning project from the Tex-Fab 2013 SKIN Competition.
keywords Digital Fabrication and Construction, Vault, Kangaroo, Grasshopper, Parametric, Installation
series ACADIA
type Research Projects
email kory@otaplus.com
last changed 2014/09/29 05:57

_id acadia14_199
id acadia14_199
authors Bieg, Kory
year 2014
title Caret 6 and the Digital Revival of Gothic Vaults
source ACADIA 14: Design Agency [Proceedings of the 34th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 9781926724478]Los Angeles 23-25 October, 2014), pp. 199-208
summary Caret 6 in an installation and exhibition designed and curated by Kory Bieg and his students from the University of Texas at Austin Studio he taught in the fall of 2013. The installation supports prototypes and the winning project from the Tex-Fab 2013 SKIN Competition.
keywords Digital Fabrication and Construction, Vault, Kangaroo, Grasshopper, Parametric, Installation
series ACADIA
type Normal Paper
email kory@otaplus.com
last changed 2014/09/29 05:51

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