CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 1 to 20 of 418

_id ascaad2007_058
id ascaad2007_058
authors Abdelhameed, W. and Y. Kobayashi
year 2007
title Developing a New Approach of Computer Use ‘KISS Modeling’ for Design-Ideas Alternatives of Form Massing: A framework for three-Dimensional Shape Recognition in Initial Design Phases
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 745-756
summary This research aims at developing a new approach called ‘KISS Modeling’. KISS is generally a rule of ‘Keep It Simple, Stupid’ that will be applied in modeling process investigated and presented by the research. The new approach is implemented in a computer program ‘KISS Modeling’ that generates three dimensional forms based on simplifying the concept of shape recognition in design. The research, however, does not employ totally concepts of shape recognition or shape understanding in Artificial Intelligence and psychology. The research, in summary, investigates and describes: 1) a new approach of computer use contributing to generating design-ideas alternatives of form massing in initial design phases, within a simple way that any designer can understand at single glance, 2) implementation of shape recognition for generative three dimensional forms, 3) function to generate different outputs from different recognition, and 4) case studies introduced through applications and functions of the three dimensional modeling system presented by the research. The research concluded that the introduced processes help the user improve the management of conceptual designing through facilitating a discourse of his/her modeling of design-ideas massing.
series ASCAAD
email wael.abdelhameed@gmail.com
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id 01c0
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 2000
title Modelling for Virtual Reality in Architecture
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 209-213
summary CAAD systems are using object modelling methods for building databases to make information available. Object data must then be made useful for many different purposes in the design process. Even if the capacity of the computer will allow an almost unlimited amount of information to be transformed, the eye does not make the transformations in the same “simple” mathematical way. Trained architects have to involve in an inventive process of finding ways to “harmonize” this new medium with the human eye and the architect’s professional experience. This paper will be an interimistic report from a surveying course. During the spring semester 2000 the CAAD division of TU-Lund is giving a course “Modelling for VR in Architecture”. The students are practising architects with experience from using object modelling CAAD. The aims are to survey different ways to use available hard- and software to create VR-models of pieces of architecture and evaluate them in desktop and CAVE environments. The architect is to do as much preparation work as possible with his CAAD program and only the final adjustments with the special VR tool.
keywords CAAD, VR, Modelling, Spatial Experience
series eCAADe
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 678e
authors Aish, Robert
year 1986
title Three-dimensional Input and Visualization
source Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [CAAD Futures Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-408-05300-3] Delft (The Netherlands), 18-19 September 1985, pp. 68-84
summary The aim of this chapter is to investigate techniques by which man-computer interaction could be improved, specifically in the context of architectural applications of CAD. In this application the object being designed is often an assembly of defined components. Even if the building is not actually fabricated from such components, it is usually conceptualized in these terms. In a conventional graphics- based CAD system these components are usually represented by graphical icons which are displayed on the graphics screen and arranged by the user. The system described here consists of three- dimensional modelling elements which the user physically assembles to form his design. Unlike conventional architectural models which are static (i.e. cannot be changed by the users) and passive (i.e. cannot be read by a CAD system), this model is both 'user generated' and 'machine readable'. The user can create, edit and view the model by simple, natural modelling activities and without the need to learn complex operating commands often associated with CAD systems. In particular, the user can view the model, altering his viewpoint and focus of attention in a completely natural way. Conventional computer graphics within an associated CAD system are used to represent the detailed geometry which the different three-dimensional icons may represent. In addition, computer graphics are also used to present the output of the performance attributes of the objects being modelled. In the architectural application described in this chapter an energy- balance evaluation is displayed for a building designed using the modelling device. While this system is not intended to offer a completely free-form input facility it can be considered to be a specialist man-machine interface of particular relevance to architects or engineers.
series CAAD Futures
email Robert.Aish@bentley.com
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ddssar0214
id ddssar0214
authors Al Hassan, F., Trum, H.M.G.J. and Rutten, P.G.S.
year 2002
title Strategic Briefing A Conceptual Process Model for Building Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Nowadays building design problems are divided in partial discipline related sub-problems. Through targeted and focused attention to sub problems however the awareness of the whole is lost. Each designparticipant gives his sub-problem first priority. In contrast in the past the master builder saw the whole problem as his problem first. Thus the process of seeing the design problem as a whole, as a result ofprioritizing, considering constraints, or strategizing, is lost in today’s practice, basically because this process is a mental and implicit process, that occurred in the brain of the multi-disciplinary master builder.In most cases it is the task of no one in a design team today. The aim of this paper is modeling this conceptual mental implicit process design using System Theory and Cognitive Psychology, trying to determine the structure of the design problem as it occurs intuitively in the brain. The result will provide us with a mechanism that enables us each time to refine a unique common design problem representation. This leads to more effective use of design team capabilities, and forms an essential basis for organizing efforts toward collaborative solutions. Also some kind of clarity is provided as to how proposed solutions are to be judged.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ascaad2014_033
id ascaad2014_033
authors Al-Mousa , Sukainah Adnan
year 2014
title Temporary Architecture: An urban mirage
source Digital Crafting [7th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2014 / ISBN 978-603-90142-5-6], Jeddah (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia), 31 March - 3 April 2014, pp. 405-413
summary One of the emerging multidisciplinary contemporary art practices is interactive installation art, which is concerned with constructing a temporary artistic environment that is digital, responsive and engaging. It is usually displayed within existing architectural context whether indoor in a gallery space or outdoor in a public space. Recent examples of such art projects show that interactivity and illusion are effectively present and highly influential in the perception and memory of the place. A digital display on a building façade can remain attached to the history of the site in the spectator’s memory even after the display is removed. An interactive space that involves body response and emotional sensory interaction can determine the narrative perceived from the experience. These trends seemingly bring together the physical context and the digital space to contain the spectator. The two mediums are merged to provide a new genre of space, hence a new mode of perception where the art space mediates people’s movement and overlay the context with new meanings. Multiple backgrounds are involved in the creative process of interactive installation art, all of which involve examining various concepts through artistic engagement with temporary spaces. Here, particularly because of interactivity and immerseveness, the spectator becomes part of the performance (the subject); with his moving and reacting he activates the narrative and probably gives it its shape. This paper aims to explore the potentials of the digital spatial display to enhance or weaken our sense of belonging to the surrounding environments while creating an illusionary space within the real physical one. It also aims to discuss how this influence would affect the memory of the mixed experience; the installation being digital, temporary and illusive and the space being physical, permanent and real. What happens to the “spectator” when contained by the digital-interactive and the physical medium(s)?. In order to unfold the mentioned questions, the study uses theories of perception and performance reflected on live case studies of recent art projects where the researcher becomes a member of the audience and an observer at the same time in order to trace the journey inside this new medium. In an era where time is being more difficult to grasp and identities of visual culture is becoming more difficult to define, temporary responsive environments can provide some openings where space becomes durational, yet, influential, and where people’s movements become more meaningful in the visual terrain.
series ASCAAD
email s.almousa@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 2016/02/15 12:09

_id avocaad_2001_13
id avocaad_2001_13
authors Alexander Koutamanis
year 2001
title Modeling irregular and complex forms
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Computational technologies provide arguably the first real opportunity architectural design has had for a comprehensive description of built form. With the advent of affordable computer-aided design systems (including drafting, modeling, visualization and simulation tools), architects believe they can be in full control of geometric aspects and, through these, of a wide spectrum of other aspects that are implicit or explicit in the geometric representation. This belief is based primarily on the efficiency and effectiveness of computer systems, ranging from the richness and adaptability of geometric primitives to the utility of geometric representations in simulations of climatic aspects. Such capabilities support attempts to design and construct more irregular or otherwise complex forms. These fall under two main categories: (1) parsing of irregularity into elementary components, and (2) correlation of the form of a building with complex geometric structures.The first category takes advantage of the compactness and flexibility of computational representations in order to analyse the form of a design into basic elements, usually elementary geometric primitives. These are either arranged into simple, unconstrained configurations or related to each other by relationships that define e.g. parametric relative positioning or Boolean combinations. In both cases the result is a reduction of local complexity and an increase of implicit or explicit relationships, including the possibility of hierarchical structures.The second category attempts to correlate built form with constraints that derive usually from construction but can also be morphological. The correlation determines the applicability of complex geometric structures (minimally ruled surfaces) to the description of a design. The product of this application is generally variable in quality, depending upon the designer's grounding in geometry and his ability to integrate constraints from different aspects in the definition of the design's geometry.Both categories represent a potential leap forward but are also equally hampered by the rigidity of the implementation mechanisms upon which they rely heavily. The paper proposes an approach to making these mechanisms subordinate to the cognitive and technical aspects of architectural thinking through fuzzy modeling. This way of modeling involves a combination of (a) canonical forms, (b) tolerances around canonical forms and positions, (c) minimal and maximal values, (d) fuzzy boundaries, and (e) plastic interaction between elements based on the dual principles of local intelligence and autonomy. Fuzzy models come therefore closer to the intuitive manners of sketching, while facilitating transition to precise and complex forms. The paper presents two applications of fuzzy modeling. The first concerns the generation of schematic building layouts, including adaptive control of programmatic requirements. The second is a system for designing stairs that can adapt themselves to changes in their immediate environment through a fuzzy definition of geometric and topological parametrization.
series AVOCAAD
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id bba7
authors Alexander, Christopher W.
year 1964
title Notes on the Synthesis of Form
source Harvard Graduate School of Design
summary Every design problem begins with an effort to achieve fitness between two entities: the form in question and its context. The form is the solution to the problem; the context defines the problem. We want to put the context and the form into effortless contact or frictionless coexistence, i.e., we want to find a good fit. For a good fit to occur in practice, one vital condition must be satisfied. It must have time to happen. In slow-changing, traditional, unselfconscious cultures, a form is adjusted soon after each slight misfit occurs. If there was good fit at some stage in the past, no matter how removed, it will have persisted, because there is an active stability at work. Tradition and taboo dampen and control the rate of change in an unselfconscious culture's designs. It is important to understand that the individual person in an unselfconscious culture needs no creative strength. He does not need to be able to improve the form, only to make some sort of change when he notices a failure. The changes may not always be for the better; but it is not necessary that they should be, since the operation of the process allows only the improvements to persist. Unselfconscious design is a process of slow adaptation and error reduction. In the unselfconscious process there is no possibility of misconstruing the situation. Nobody makes a picture of the context, so the picture cannot be wrong. But the modern, selfconscious designer works entirely from a picture in his mind - a conceptualization of the forces at work and their interrelationships - and this picture is almost always wrong. To achieve in a few hours at the drawing board what once took centuries of adaptation and development, to invent a form suddenly which clearly fits its context - the extent of invention necessary is beyond the individual designer. A designer who sets out to achieve an adaptive good fit in a single leap is not unlike the child who shakes his glass-topped puzzle fretfully, expecting at one shake to arrange the bits inside correctly. The designer's attempt is hardly as random as the child's is; but the difficulties are the same. His chances of success are small because the number of factors which must fall simultaneously into place is so enormous. The process of design, even when it has become selfconscious, remains a process of error-reduction. No complex system will succeed in adapting in a reasonable amount of time or effort unless the adaptation can proceed component by component, each component relatively independent of the others. The search for the right components, and the right way to build the form up from these components, is the greatest challenge faced by the modern, selfconscious designer. The culmination of the modern designer's task is to make every unit of design both a component and a system. As a component it will fit into the hierarchy of larger components that are above it; as a system it will specify the hierarchy of smaller components of which it itself is made.
series thesis:PhD
email services@patternlanguage.com
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id sigradi2016_615
id sigradi2016_615
authors Almeida , Rafael Goffinet de; Santos, Fábio Lopes Souza
year 2016
title Um olhar sobre a relação entre sujeitos e meios técnicos: O público como construção social mediada [Looking at the relationship between subjects and technical means: The audience as mediated social construction]
source SIGraDi 2016 [Proceedings of the 20th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-956-7051-86-1] Argentina, Buenos Aires 9 - 11 November 2016, pp.872-879
summary This article analyses some of the proposals produced in the late 1970´s by the American contemporary artist Dan Graham, in which he uses technical means to investigate the audience´s perception and behavior. The questions raised highlight reciprocity phenomena and identity constructions – factors that affect our experience and behavior in contemporary cities daily life. All of these issues derive from Graham´s investigations of the main information and communication technologies (media) produced at that time, and which continue to offer reflections on current relationship between technical means and the subject – that is, his/her condition as audience, observer, spectator or user.
keywords Dan Graham; Contemporary art; Contemporary Architecture and City; Technical means; Contemporary spatiality
series other
type normal paper
email rafael.goffinet.almeida@usp.br
last changed 2017/06/21 12:49

_id f500
authors Almeida Sampaio, A.
year 1999
title Automation of Deck Bridge Representations
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 69-79
summary The bridge deck has a apparent simple shape, but it is the result of an adequate combination of two longitudinal geometric components: the deck shape evolution along de longitudinal section the layout of the road, that acts in simultaneous over a cross section, defining the deck exact shape. A geometric modelling computer programme was developed for box girder decks, allowing the generation of cross sections along the deck, defined with correct shape and location. In the elaboration of the deck plan drawings, the geometric information of the real deck shape is required. This information is not managed in an integrated and automatic way. On the creation of these drawings, directly executed over a graphic system, the time consumed is considerable and it is easy to comet errors. This paper describes the drawing module included in the computer program refereed. The deck plan projections are obtained, in DXF format drawing files, using the geometric information obtained from 3D-deck model. Using the drawing module it is possible to generate the usual deck drawings required in bridge design process. Then, his module is a great support for the design process within its geometric design stage.
series AVOCAAD
email zita@civil.ist.utl.pt
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 8ccf
authors Alvarez, Darío
year 2000
title Atravesando el portal digital: la novísima Arquitectura de los tiempos de la Internet. - (Crossing the Digital Gateway: The Latest Architecture of the Times of the Internet)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 30-33
summary Our architectonical environment is based on the material concept - entity whose control marks the relevance of the XX century: the atom. Across the threshold of the XXI century a new virtual entity - concept: the bit, spreads to became the basic unit of power - control - production, being its more dynamic evidence the phenomenon known as Internet, establishing complex relationships with groups constituted in the net like Virtual Communities, outlining metaphors that involve Urbanists and Architects inviting them as protagonist. Against this newest reality the Architect should change his vision of the typical CAAD work in relative isolation with his computer, until crossing the doors of the “digital reality”; we search to show the contemporary Architect as a manager coordinating multiple resources with different importance: into the alternative of building digital realities, inviting the architectonical students to integrated this Virtual Communities or conform his owns.
series SIGRADI
email dalvarez@posta.arq.ucv.ve, alvarezd@camelot.rect.ucv.ve
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2013_117
id sigradi2013_117
authors Alves Veloso, Pedro L.; Anja Pratschke
year 2013
title Uma Arqueologia de Diagramas Cibernéticos [An Archaeology of Cybernetic Diagrams]
source SIGraDi 2013 [Proceedings of the 17th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-956-7051-86-1] Chile - Valparaíso 20 - 22 November 2013, pp. 353 - 356
summary This paper investigates the use of explicit structures of information in architectural design. Particularly, it approaches the use of diagrams related to cybernetics and information theory in experimental practices in the 1960’s and 1970’s. It analyses the diagram of cybernetic control proposed by the cybernetician Gordon Pask for the Fun Palace, the diagrams produced by the utopian architect Yona Friedman in the conceptual description of the Flatwriter program and Christopher Alexander’s diagrams and his theories of Synthesis of Form and Pattern Language. Finally it establishes a brief parallel between current domestication and use of dataflow programming with the cybernetic diagrams, highlighting differences in their complexity approach.
keywords Dataflow diagrams; Cybernetics; Complexity
series SIGRADI
email pedroveloso13@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2014_108
id sigradi2014_108
authors Alves, Gilfranco Medeiros; Anja Pratschke
year 2014
title De Uexküll à Pask: a Conversação aplicada à Processos Digitais de Projeto [From Uexküll to Pask: Conversation applied to Didital Design Process]
source SIGraDi 2014 [Proceedings of the 18th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-9974-99-655-7] Uruguay - Montevideo 12 - 14 November 2014, pp. 82-85
summary The paper will present one specific aspect of the PhD research called Cibersemiótica e Processos de Projeto: Metodologia em Revisão, funded by FAPESP, which in turn is linked to the Nomads.usp research group of the University of São Paulo. The paper discusses the relevance of communication and information management in the digital design processes from the synchronic study of concepts such as feedback loop, control and self-regulation. These concepts are present in both biosemiotic and interactive design of functional cycle proposed in 1934 by biologist Jakob von Uexküll, as in cybernetic development proposed by Gordon Pask in his sophisticated Conversation Theory in the early 1970’s.
keywords Biosemiotics; Cybernetics; Cybersemiotics; Conversation Theory; functional cycle;
series SIGRADI
email gilfranco.alves@ufms.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id cf2015_485
id cf2015_485
authors Anaf, Márcia and Harris, Ana Lúcia Nogueira de Camargo
year 2015
title The geometry of Chuck Hoberman as the basis for the development of dynamic experimental structures
source The next city - New technologies and the future of the built environment [16th International Conference CAAD Futures 2015. Sao Paulo, July 8-10, 2015. Electronic Proceedings/ ISBN 978-85-85783-53-2] Sao Paulo, Brazil, July 8-10, 2015, pp. 485.
summary The cognitive-theoretical foundation referring to teach drawing as a way of thinking, as well as the construction of the environment by means of drawing using transforming geometries and the formal and para-formal computational process, creating unusual geometries through generative design processes and methodologies, can be seen as some of the main possibilities in exploring dynamic experimental structures for an Adaptive Architecture. This article presents the development of a model for articulated facades, inspired by Hoberman´s Tessellates, and his Adaptive Building Initiative (ABI) project to develop facades models that respond in real time to environmental changes. In addition, we describe an experiment based on the retractable structures, inspired by Hoberman´s work and experimentations. Solutions for responsive facades can offer more flexible architectural solutions providing better use of natural light and contributing to saving energy. Using Rhinoceros and the Grasshopper for modeling and test the responsiveness, the parametric model was created to simulate geometric panels of hexagonal grids that would open and close in reaction to translational motion effects, regulating the amount of light that reaches the building.
keywords Parametric architecture, Hoberman´s Tessellates, Adaptive Building Initiative (ABI), Articulated Facades, Complex Geometries, Retractable structures, Retractable polyhedra.
series CAAD Futures
email marciaanaf@uol.com.br
last changed 2015/06/29 05:55

_id acadia10_125
id acadia10_125
authors Andersen, Paul; Salomon, David
year 2010
title The Pattern That Connects
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 125-132
summary While patterns have a spotty history in architecture, their definitions and uses in other fields offer new possibilities for design. This paper examines those definitions and uses—including theories put forward by architectural theorist, Christopher Alexander; art educator, Gyorgy Kepes; chemist, Ilya Prigogine; and anthropologist, Gregory Bateson. Of particular interest is the shift from eternal, essential, universal, and fundamental patterns to fleeting, superficial, specific, and incidental versions. While endemic to many contemporary architectural practices, this multifaceted view of patterns was anticipated by Bateson, who saw them as agents of evolution and learning. His desire to combine redundancy and noise offers architects new ways to understand patterns and use them to link form and information, matter and thought.
keywords pattern, Bateson, evolution, noise, redundancy, feedback
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email Paul@indiearchitecture.com
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id sigradi2005_000
id sigradi2005_000
authors Angulo, Antonieta and Vásquez de Velasco, Guillermo (eds.)
year 2005
title SiGradi2005: Vision and Visualization
source Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics Graphics / ISBN 978-1-59975-306-5] Lima (Perú) 21-23 november 2005, 826 p.
summary Paradoxically, one of the most difficult but enjoyable things we do is to imagine. To open the eyes of our mind and see what no one else can see. We see images of things that are yet to be and through the same skill we devise ways in which to make them happen. We design the future in the form of environments, graphics, products, films, and a growing range of new media. Our ability to develop a vision and to visualize it is a gift that we are called to cultivate and put to good use. We have been privileged with a great responsibility. In the process of developing a vision and communicating that vision to others, we “visualize”. Visualization can be a very private experience in which we are alone with mental images that help us shape our vision. In other instances visualization can be a component of mass communication. Visualization can be a means or can be an end. It can be a small architectural sketch on a paper napkin or a mega-graphic covering a high-rise building, an airplane or a ship. In every case, the relationship between vision and visualization is a mutually supportive articulation of what our eyes and our minds can see. Our vision of the role of computers in the art and science of visualization is in constant development. Computer visualization can support an intimate dialog between a designer and his/her vision. It can translate and communicate that vision to a larger audience and in the hands of a new-media artist it can actually constitute his/her vision. The 9th Annual Conference of SIGraDI (Ibero American Society for Computer Graphics) will explore our collective vision on the future of digital visualization and digital media in Environmental Design, Product Design, Graphic Design, Cinematography, New Media, and Art. Authors are invited to share their research work with a focus on how it contributes to shape a collective understanding of the past, awareness of the present, and vision of the future in our multiple disciplines.
series SIGRADI
email vasquez@archone.tamu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ga9926
id ga9926
authors Antonini, Riccardo
year 1999
title Let's Improvise Together
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The creators of ‘Let's-Improvise-Together’ adhere to the idea that while there is a multitude of online games now available in cyberspace, it appears that relatively few are focused on providing a positive, friendly and productive experience for the user. Producing this kind of experience is one the goals of our Amusement Project.To this end, the creation of ‘Let's Improvise Together’ has been guided by dedication to the importance of three themes:* the importance of cooperation,* the importance of creativity, and* the importance of emotion.Description of the GameThe avatar arrives in a certain area where there are many sound-blocks/objects. Or he may add sound "property" to existing ones. He can add new objects at will. Each object may represents a different sound, they do not have to though. The avatar walks around and chooses which objects he likes. Makes copies of these and add sounds or change the sounds on existing ones, then with all of the sound-blocks combined make his personalized "instrument". Now any player can make sounds on the instrument by approaching or bumping into a sound-block. The way that the avatar makes sounds on the instrument can vary. At the end of the improvising session, the ‘composition’ will be saved on the instrument site, along with the personalized instrument. In this way, each user of the Amusement Center will leave behind him a unique instrumental creation, that others who visit the Center later will be able to play on and listen to. The fully creative experience of making a new instrument can be obtained connecting to Active Worlds world ‘Amuse’ and ‘Amuse2’.Animated colorful sounding objects can be assembled by the user in the Virtual Environment as a sort of sounding instrument. We refrain here deliberately from using the word musical instrument, because the level of control we have on the sound in terms of rythm and melody, among other parameters, is very limited. It resembles instead, very closely, to the primitive instruments used by humans in some civilizations or to the experience made by children making sound out of ordinary objects. The dimension of cooperation is of paramount importance in the process of building and using the virtual sounding instrument. The instrument can be built on ones own effort but preferably by a team of cooperating users. The cooperation has as an important corolary: the sharing of the experience. The shared experience finds its permanence in the collective memory of the sounding instruments built. The sounding instrument can be seen also as a virtual sculpture, indeed this sculpture is a multimedial one. The objects have properties that ranges from video animation to sound to virtual physical properties like solidity. The role of the user representation in the Virtual World, called avatar, is important because it conveys, among other things, the user’s emotions. It is worth pointing out that the Avatar has no emotions on its own but it simply expresses the emotions of the user behind it. In a way it could be considered a sort of actor performing the script that the user gives it in real-time while playing.The other important element of the integration is related to the memory of the experience left by the user into the Virtual World. The new layout is explored and experienced. The layout is a permanent editable memory. The generative aspects of Let's improvise together are the following.The multi-media virtual sculpture left behind any participating avatar is not the creation of a single author/artist. The outcome of the sinergic interaction of various authors is not deterministic, nor predictable. The authors can indeed use generative algorythm in order to create the texture to be used on the objects. Usually, in our experience, the visitors of the Amuse worlds use shareware programs in order to generate their texture. In most cases the shareware programs are simple fractals generators. In principle, it is possible to generate also the shape of the object in a generative way. Taking into account the usual audience of our world, we expected visitors to use very simple algorythm that could generate shapes as .rwx files. Indeed, noone has attempted to do so insofar. As far as the music is concerned, the availability of shareware programs that allow simple generation of sounds sequences has made possible, for some users, to generate sounds sequences to be put in our world. In conclusion, the Let's improvise section of the Amuse worlds could be open for experimentation on generative art as a very simple entry point platform. We will be very happy to help anybody that for educational purposes would try to use our platform in order to create and exhibit generative forms of art.
series other
email Riccardo.Antonini@UniRoma2.it
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id sigradi2004_257
id sigradi2004_257
authors Antonio Serrato-Combe
year 2004
title Something 's gotta give' architectural animations
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary Architectural animations are like Harry Langer, a fifty-something entertainment mogul played by best actor nominee Jack Nicholson in the film Something.s Gotta Give. They.ve been surrounded by plenty of pathetic spiritless gimmicks. And, like Harry in the film, they have suffered a heart attack. Harry did not die. Architectural animations are still around, barely. Something.s wrong with them. When Harry begins to recover, he.s surprised to find himself growing fond of a woman his own age (played by best actress nominee Dianne Keaton). This is precisely what should happen to architectural animations. They need to come to terms with more mature attitudes and approaches. This paper presents a new and different approach to architectural animations. In ninety nine percent of the cases, architectural animations have been produced at the end of the design process, just when architects or architecture students are ready to present their schemes to an audience or client group. All design decisions have been made. All aspects of the architectural solutions have been set. Tectonic qualities, lighting schemes, construction approaches, everything has been cast in stone. The animation is simply shown as a public relations gesture to broadcast to the audience that the design team is digitally savvy and uses the latest technologies. The proposition contained herein is that animations be used throughout the design process, that is, from beginning to end.
series SIGRADI
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ascaad2006_paper19
id ascaad2006_paper19
authors Arjun, G. and J. Plume
year 2006
title Collaborative Architectural Design as a reflective Conversation: an agent facilitated system to support collaborative conceptual design
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary In this paper, definitions of collaborative design are discussed and understood in terms of a designer’s cognitive collaborations to explore his/her experiential memory for remote idea associations. Based on Schon’s reflective practice theory, Valkenburg and Dorst’s (1998) description of collaborative team designing is adopted as a model for a proposed design conversation system. The design conversation system is aimed at triggering the experiential memory of the designer by associating significant ideas from different design domains to provide different perspectives of a design situation. The paper describes a proposed framework for the design conversation system incorporating computational agents in a blackboard architecture environment.
series ASCAAD
email j.plume@unsw.edu.au
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id sigradi2009_864
id sigradi2009_864
authors Arruda, Anna Karla Trajano de; Arivaldo Leão de Amorim
year 2009
title Preservação e Gestão de Sítios Históricos: a contribuição do Heritage Information System [Preservation and Management of Cultural Heritage: the contribuition Heritage Information System]
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary The present article aims to discuss the application of the digital technologies in the preservation and management of cultural heritage development. The GIS is used by the international agencies heritage like UNESCO. The GIS applications that are largely applied in built cultural heritage are internationally known as Heritage Information System – HIS. In HIS, the space configuration of the historical sites is represented by a map or for a DTM, with the quantitative and qualitative attributes, 3D geometric models and hypermedia products. Their visualization are enriched by techniques of virtual reality and published in the web.
keywords Preservação e Gestão; Patrimônio Cultural; Documentação Arquitetônica; Geographic Information System; Banco de dados; Heritage Information System
series SIGRADI
email karlarruda@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ecaade2009_087
id ecaade2009_087
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 2009
title Evolution of Design Support Methods – from Formal Systems to Environment
source Computation: The New Realm of Architectural Design [27th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-8-9] Istanbul (Turkey) 16-19 September 2009, pp. 817-824
wos WOS:000334282200100
summary In the paper the main stages of the evolution of aided design methods (which led to the formation of new spaces of creation) will be presented. The first way in which human tried make his work easier were direct introduction of scientific researches in practice. Comprehension and studying the structure of design process creates real conditions for increase of its efficiency. Thanks to methodological researches the systematic design methods were developed. The next steep was introducing the IT technologies into the design process. Firstly as a simple tool, and after as the participant of the creative process. Last years an idea of “direct designing” – the use of VR as an environment for the spatial forms creation was elaborated. The environment starts to play a role of an active mediator joining the real world, the men and the computer. In this environment the designer has access to the processes and sources of creative activity. The qualitatively new process of architectural designing arises.
keywords Methodology, creativity, design environment
series eCAADe
email asan@pb.edu.pl
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

For more results click below:

this is page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5... show page 20HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_70468 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002