CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 10 of 10

_id caadria2014_164
id caadria2014_164
authors Jemtrud, Michael and Keith G. Ragsdale
year 2014
title Three Little Shacks
source Rethinking Comprehensive Design: Speculative Counterculture, Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2014) / Kyoto 14-16 May 2014, pp. 883–892
summary The paper is premised upon the notion that tools and techniques have the potential to resist the premature prefiguring of problems and solutions in projectbased activity, with particular relevance in collaborative design practices. The architect’s métier and mode of knowledge production is marked by the capacity to make artefacts. Because our age is characterized by the imperative to innovate and evolve technically, architectural ideation must now engage an array of computationally-based tools for imaging, information management, simulation and fabrication. This paper, framed within the theoretical and productive context of a research-creation project, investigates the ontological status of process-work, speed, and the notion of failing fast through the prototyping of three small buildings, or shacks. It does this through a strategic choreography of factual and counterfactual investigations that give rise to fabricative knowledge incapable of being prescribed conceptually from the outset. It will be claimed that, in the case of architecture, the potential of technics to reflectively and playfully re-work things and ideas is also a participatory mode of ethical engagement.
keywords Tools; tool-making; technics; prototyping; architecture
series CAADRIA
email michael.jemtrud@mcgill.ca
last changed 2014/04/22 08:23

_id 2004_435
id 2004_435
authors Jemtrud, Michael
year 2004
title Between Mediation and Making CIMSp: A Technoètic Modus Operandi
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 435-442
summary The following paper describes an ongoing research project whose goal is to define a scalable, hybrid production and deployment protocol (CIMSp) for the creation of virtual environments (VE). Ultimately, the aim is to establish a creative workflow and infrastructure that embodies architectural and urban design activity as practiced by the research unit. The objective of the present paper is to schematically outline the current state of the research and its practical and theoretical context for further development. A theoretical position will be stated which assumes that the content, tool, epistemological, and speculative realms are consubstantial (technoèsis). The practical endeavour is to create the informational and embodied temporal--spatial condition of possibility for the imaginative production of cultural artifacts. It must accommodate varying individual and collaborative forms and styles of making and no presumption of a self-enclosed and referential system is made. A critical position is particularly compelling when this production is immersed in technological modalities of making where information and embodiment are inextricably intertwined. CIMSp is based on the workflow from acquisition and creation to output and storage. The work environment is comprised of a select set of software applications and visualization technologies. Secondly, an XML-based content and information management system is under construction to ensure project quality control, rigorous documentation practices, and bi-directional knowledge feedback procedures to enable an effective and resource-full workflow. Lastly, scalability of output modalities for use in the design process and for final presentation from WWW deployment to a high-resolution collaborative work environment (CWE) is being developed. The protocol is a multiuser mode of creation and production that aims to transform the technologies and their interrelation, thus dramatically impacting the creative process and intended content. It is a digital production workflow that embodies intensive visualization criteria demanded by the end users. The theoretical and practical intention of CIMSp is to provisionally structure the collaborative creative process and enable a choreographed movement between the realms of the technologically mediated and made in the pursuit of significant digital content creation.
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id acadia06_496
id acadia06_496
authors Jemtrud, Michael
year 2006
title Eucalyptus: User Controlled Lightpath Enabled Participatory Design Studio
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 496-509
summary A new notion of participation is at stake with advances in technologically mediated work environments. The digitally mediated e-design studio has been around since the mid-1990’s and has been employed in various forms in disciplines including architecture/engineering/construction (AEC), industrial design, and the automotive industry. Insufficient bandwidth and insufficiently powerful, crudely coordinated tools resulted in distributed task-based modes of collaboration that did not allow full participation by members of the distributed design team. At the very least, the present “second generation” network severely limits the applications, tools, and modes of communication that can be used in data and visualization intense design scenarios. The emergence of Service Oriented Architectures and User-Controlled LightPaths (“intelligent infrastructure”) herald the beginning of a new age where fully participatory multi-site design may become possible. The networks, visualization & communication tools, Service Oriented Architecture & Web Services, work protocols, and physical site designs of the Participatory Design Studio (PDS) being developed by the authors will constitute one of the first working examples of this future. This paper will briefly outline the “mise en scène” or staging of the technical configuration of the Eucalyptus project; observations and results from the creative activity of the PDS in the context of two case studies; and speculate on the implications for design activity, pedagogy, and a more robust mode of participation.
series ACADIA
email mjemtrud@connect.carleton.ca
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id jemtrud02_paper_eaea07
id jemtrud02_paper_eaea07
authors Jemtrud, Michael
year 2008
title Emerging Technologies in a Participatory Design Studio_between Carleton University and Pennsylvania State University
source Proceedings of the 8th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference
summary As a preliminary report on a proof-of-concept design studio conducted during the spring semester of 2007 between the Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS) at Carleton University in Ottawa and the Immersive Environment Laboratory (IEL) at Pennsylvania State University, the paper first describes the implementation of this network-centric collaborative design platform. The report articulates the “staging” of the conditions of possibility for a dynamic interplay between technological mediation and the reality of making, then compares the use of high bandwidth technology with customized symmetrical toolsets in the tele-collaborative educational environment, versus commercial toolsets deployed over moderate bandwidth connections. In each setting, the collaborative environment is assessed according to issues encountered by students and design outcomes. The effectiveness of the digitally mediated collaborative studio is also gauged in terms of student reaction to the learning process via feedback surveys and questionnaires.
keywords design, collaboration, tele-presence, visualization, broadband
series EAEA
email michael.jemtrud@mcgill.ca
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id sigradi2005_362
id sigradi2005_362
authors Jemtrud, Michael; Konstantin Privalov
year 2005
title “User Controlled LightPath” Enabled Participatory Design Studio: first steps
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 362-368
summary The technical scheme and creative scenario of a new media-based “User Controlled Lightpath Provisioning” (UCLP) enabled “Participatory Design Studio” will be elaborated. This practical collaborative work environment model represents a technologically robust and sophisticated means of communication and sharing of resources that stands to radically transform design processes. UCLP technology is a fibre based software solution designed to enable end-users to create their own discipline or application-specific IP network whose topology and architecture is optimized for their particular applications needs and requirements. A distinction between “task-based collaboration” found in conventional “Virtual Design Studios” and the heterogeneous nature of the “participatory” work environment will be made. UCLP technology provides a secure, large bandwidth, low latency network that can accommodate up to 10Gbps. This capability creates an environment which is not dependent upon traditional low bandwidth requirements for communication, visualization, and production therefore allowing a greater range of desired tools for creative activity.
series SIGRADI
email michael_jemtrud@carleton.ca
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id 2006_486
id 2006_486
authors Jemtrud, Michael; Martin Brooks; Bobby Ho; Sandy Lui; Philam Nguyen; John Spence and Bruce Spencer
year 2006
title Intelligent Infrastructure Enabled Participatory Design Studio - Eucalyptus: Collaborating at the speed of light
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 486-493
summary A new notion of participation is at stake with advances in technologically mediated work environments. Insufficient bandwidth and insufficiently powerful, crudely coordinated tools resulted in distributed task-based modes of collaboration that did not allow full participation by members of the distributed design team. The emergence of Service Oriented Architectures and User-Controlled LightPaths (“intelligent infrastructure”) herald the beginning of a new age where fully participatory multi-site design may become possible. This paper will briefly outline the “mise en scène” or staging of the technical configuration of the Eucalyptus project; observations and results from the creative activity of the PDS in the context of two case studies; and speculate on the implications for design activity, pedagogy, and a more robust mode of participation.
keywords participatory design studio; e-design; SOA; architectural design education; design methods; dashboard
series eCAADe
email mjemtrud@ccs.carleton.ca
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_710
id 2006_710
authors Jemtrud, Michael; Philam Nguyen; James Hayes; Grant Oikawa and Ryan McLennan
year 2006
title A Theory of Artistry for 3D Data Fusion - The element of craft in digital reconstruction
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 710-713
summary The following paper will articulate through an urban renewal proposal project for an area in Montréal, Canada that uses a “3D imaging and modeling protocol” and that accounts for the interaction between mediation and making in digitizing and constructing existing conditions digital artifacts. The protocol incorporates multi-sensor technologies with modeling and rendering techniques through a process of interpolation between a heterogeneous set of existing photographic, physical, and 2D documentation. The mode of operation implemented is a multi-layered and hybrid approach that recognizes the interplay between human scale and perception, visualization and abstraction of data and geometric accuracy, space and time.
keywords 3D modeling; digital reconstruction; craft; urban re-development
series eCAADe
email mjemtrud@ccs.carleton.ca
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id cf2009_547
id cf2009_547
authors Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Hawker, Ronald; Terzidis, Kostas; Narahara, Taro; Abdelhameed, Wael; Fukuda, Tomohiro; Labarca, Claudio; Calderon, Carlos and Jemtrud, Michael
year 2009
title World8: International working group for new virtual reality applications in architecture
source T. Tidafi and T. Dorta (eds) Joining Languages, Cultures and Visions: CAADFutures 2009, PUM, 2009, pp. 547- 556
summary This paper introduces the activities of World8, an international working group on virtual reality, and demonstrates the group’s developed VR applications in architecture. Group members come from eight universities around the world, including the United States, the United Kingdom, Japan, Chile, Canada, Egypt, and the United Arab Emirates. The main objective is to develop a research framework for collaboration between architectural schools and a software developing company. Specifically, the group is looking to create new applications for VR visualizations of urban settings with dynamic agents such as human and vehicular traffic. Models developed by these members are explained, and the project is reviewed based on survey results.
keywords Virtual reality, 3D city modeling, agent-based simulations, international project, education
series CAAD Futures
type normal paper
email ykobaya@asu.edu
last changed 2010/04/04 14:41

_id ijac20097205
id ijac20097205
authors Muramoto, Katsuhiko; Jemtrud, Michael; Kumar, Sonali; Balakrishnan, Bimal; Wiley, Danielle
year 2009
title A Cyber-Enabled Collaborative Design Studio
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 7 - no. 2, 267-288
summary The research project investigates the use of a network-enabled platform involving a combination of technologies. As a preliminary report on a proof-of-concept design studio conducted in 2007 between Carleton University and Pennsylvania State University, the paper first describes the implementation of this network-centric collaborative design platform. The report articulates the “staging” of the conditions of possibility for a dynamic interplay between technological mediation and the reality of making, then compares the use of high bandwidth technology with customized symmetrical toolsets in the telecollaborative environment, versus commercial toolsets deployed over moderate bandwidth connections. In each setting, the collaborative environment is assessed according to issues encountered by students and design outcomes. The effectiveness of the digitally mediated collaborative studio is also gauged in terms of student reaction to the learning process via feedback surveys and questionnaires.
series journal
last changed 2009/08/11 06:39

_id caadria2008_45_session4b_364
id caadria2008_45_session4b_364
authors Muramoto, Katsuhiko; Sonali Kumar, Michael Jemtrud, Danielle Wiley
year 2008
title Participation, Intersubjectivity, And Presence In a Digitally Mediated Workspace: A Participatory Design Studio between Pennsylvania State University and Carleton University
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 364-370
summary A paradigm shift in the world of architecture brought by the recent developments in visualization and communication technology not only offers us drastically different ways to collaborate, but also questions traditional location dependent collaborations. This new technology offers us new possibilities for a more phenomenologically rich mode of creative activity and participation. The goal of the Participatory Design Studio was to allow architecture students in multiple locations to collaborate in real-time by sharing computational resources, geometric datasets, and multimedia content including high-definition video. The technologies involved in this research include the National LambdaRail (layer 3, PacketNet with 1Gb/s connection) and CA*net 4 (Canadian broadband layer 2 with 10gb/s lightpath connectivity) allowing Standard Definition videoconference, utilization of Deep Computing Visualization, Remote Visual Networking (RVN) and Web Service access and control of the APN devices through the dashboard solution that makes integration seamless to the workflow and transparent to the user.
keywords design: collaboration; tele-presence; visualization; broadband
series CAADRIA
email {kxm15, suk189}@psu.edu, michael.jemtrud@mcgill.ca, dwiley@connect.carleton.ca
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

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