CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 14 of 14

_id 011e
authors Engeli, M. and Kurmann, D.
year 1996
title Spatial objects and intelligent agents in a virtual environment
source Automation in Construction 5 (3) (1996) pp. 141-150
summary Many CAD software tools are available today for architectural design. They are useful for drafting, but tools that support design development in an early stage are still missing. In a conceptual phase of the design aspects other than precision and measurements become important. With today's knowledge and technological possibilities new ways of interaction, different data structures and intelligent support tools can be implemented. This article describes our research on new ways to support the design development in an early stage. The concept of modelling spaces, the virtual modelling tool and the integration of intelligent agents are described.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id ec0e
authors Engeli, M. and Kurmann, D.
year 1996
title A Virtual Reality Design Environment with Intelligent Objects and Autonomous Agents
source H.J.P. Timmermans (ed.), Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Conference, Vol. 1: Architecture Proceedings, pp. 132-142
summary New technological achievements and research results allow for the creation of innovative design tools for architects, that do not originate from paper-based paradigms but instead make optimised use of the present technology and programming concepts. The core of our system is comprised of an intuitive interactive modelling tool. It runs in a virtual reality set-up, where the user can use 3D glasses to experience rooms and 3D input devices to model in three dimensions. The interface is free from widget-like buttons or menus, so that the user is undisturbed when moving into the virtual world of the design. The system can also run in a distributed fashion, so that a number of users can look at and modify the same design. The 3D model can be generated in a sketch-like fashion using solids and voids, void modelling turns out to be very valuable for architectural design. The objects in this system can contain forms of intelligence to produce such behaviour as: falling because of gravity, collision avoidance, and autonomous motion. Interactive behaviour can also be assigned to the objects. Autonomous Agents are added to the system to enhance the designer support. These are agents that enhance the virtual environment, agents that take over tasks, and agents that help to test the design. The system shows new interface and interaction approaches that support the architectural design process intelligently.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 0128
authors Engeli, M., Kurmann, D. and Schmitt, G.
year 1995
title A New Design Studio: Intelligent Objects and Personal Agents
source Computing in Design - Enabling, Capturing and Sharing Ideas [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-04-7] University of Washington (Seattle, Washington / USA) October 19-22, 1995, pp. 155-170
summary As design processes and products are constantly increasing in complexity, new tools are being developed for the designer to cope with the growing demands. In this paper we describe our research towards a design environment, within which different aspects of design can be combined, elaborated and controlled. New hardware equipment will be combined with recent developments in graphics and artificial intelligence programming to develop appropriate computer based tools and find possible new design techniques. The core of the new design studio comprises intelligent objects in a virtual reality environment that exhibit different behaviours drawn from Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Artificial Life (AL) principles, a part already realised in a tool called 'Sculptor'. The tasks of the architect will focus on preferencing and initiating good tendencies in the development of the design. A first set of software agents, assistants that support the architect in viewing, experiencing and judging the design has also been conceptualised for this virtual design environment. The goal is to create an optimised environment for the designer, where the complexity of the design task can be reduced thanks to the support made available from the machine.
keywords Architectural Design, Design Process, Virtual Reality, Artificial Intelligence, Personal Agents
series ACADIA
email maia@enge.li
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id ddssar9609
id ddssar9609
authors Engeli, Maia and Kurmann, David
year 1996
title A Virtual Reality Design Environment with Intelligent Objects and Autonomous Agents
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary New technological achievements and research results allow for the creation of innovative design tools for architects, that do not originate from paper-based paradigms but instead make optimised use of the present technology and programming concepts. The core of our system is comprised of an intuitive interactive modelling tool. It runs in a virtual reality set-up, where the user can use 3D glasses to expe-rience rooms and 31) input devices to model in three dimensions. The interface is free from widget-like buttons or menus, so that the user is undisturbed when moving into the virtual world of the design. The system can also run in a distributed fashion, so that a number of users can look at and modify the same design. The 31) model can be generated in a sketch-like fashion using solids and voids, void modelling turns out to be very valuable for architectural design. The objects in this system can contain forms of intelligence to produce such behaviour as: falling because of gravity, collision avoidance, and autonomous motion. Interactive behaviour can also be assigned to the objects. Autonomous Agents are added to the system to enhance the designer support. These are agents that enhance the virtual environment, agents that take over tasks, and agents that help to test the design. The system shows new interface and interaction approaches that support the architectural design process intelligently.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id c408
authors Hirschberg, U., Schmitt, G., Kurmann, D., Kolarevic, B., Johnson, B. and Donath, D.
year 1999
title The 24 Hour Design Cycle: An Experiment in Design Collaboration over the Internet
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 181-190
summary This paper describes a Virtual Design Studio exercise involving three academic institutions University - Hong Kong (China), ETH Zurich (Switzerland), and University of Washington, Seattle (USA) - whereby teachers and students, obviously on three different continents and in three different time zones, roughly eight hours apart, were working on a common design project using computer-aided design systems, video-conferencing and a web-based central database that managed and displayed all works throughout the process. The 24 hour design cycle is a metaphor for a more open and international approach to design, facilitated through computer networks. It implies a new form of collective authorship and distributed credits and thus deals with some of the essential challenges and opportunities the internet poses to creative disciplines.
series CAADRIA
email hirschberg@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2000/01/13 11:02

_id cd01
authors Kolarevic, B. (et. al.)
year 1998
title An Experiment in Design Collaboration
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 90-99
summary Computer supported communication and collaboration among partners in the building design and construction process are no longer mere possibilities, but, given the will and know-how of the participants, a reality. Team members could work on a building design at any place, simultaneously together (synchronously) or separately (asynchronously), while the latest state of the design would always be available in a shared database. But to be successful, this emerging type of cooperation often requires new design and communication methods. This paper documents an experimental approach to design collaboration, tested in an intensive, one-week long Virtual Design Studio exercise involving three academic institutions. It briefly describes the structure and goals of the studio exercise, the methodologies applied, the resulting process of collaboration, and the lessons learned.

series ACADIA
email branko@hku.hk, schmitt@arch.ethz.ch, hirsch@arch.ethz.ch, kurmann@arch.ethz.ch, brj@u.washington.edu
last changed 1998/12/16 08:36

_id 217b
authors Kolarevic, B. Schmitt, G., Hirschberg, U., Kurmann, D. and Johnson, Brian
year 2000
title An experiment in design collaboration
source Automation in Construction 9 (1) (2000) pp. 73-81
summary Computer supported communication and collaboration among partners in the building design and construction process are no longer mere possibilities, but, given the will and know-how of the participants, a reality. Team members could work on a building design at any place, simultaneously together (synchronously) or separately (asynchronously), while the latest state of the design would always be available in a shared database. But to be successful, this emerging type of cooperation often requires new design and communication methods. This paper documents an experimental approach to design collaboration, tested in an intensive, one-week long Virtual Design Studio exercise involving three academic institutions. It briefly describes the structure and goals of the studio exercise, the methodologies applied, the resulting process of collaboration, and the lessons learned.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 12
authors Kolarevic, B., Schmitt, G., Hirschberg, U., Kurmann, D. and Johnson, B.
year 1998
title Virtual Design Studio - Multiplying Time: 3x8 H = 24 H
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 106-115
summary This paper describes a Virtual Design Studio exercise involving three academic institutions-University of Hong Kong, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Z¸rich, and University of Washington in Seattle-whereby teachers and students, obviously on three different continents and in three different time zones, roughly eight hours apart, tried to "multiply time". Students were asked to design a house for a Chinese painter and a Swiss writer on a small island in Puget Sound near Seattle. In a short and intensive design charrette, students explored in five different phases various dualities associated with the given design problem. In each phase students were asked to select someone else's design, thus implicitly forming design teams. The paper describes the structure and goals of the studio exercise, the methodologies applied, the resulting design processes, and the lessons learned.
series SIGRADI
email branko@pobox.upenn.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:54

_id 0ab6
authors Kolarevic, B., Schmitt., G., Hirschberg, U. and Kurmann, D.
year 1998
title Virtual Design Studio : Multiplying Time
source Computerised Craftsmanship [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Paris (France) 24-26 September 1998, pp. 123-130
summary This paper describes a Virtual Design Studio exercise involving three academic institutions-University of Hong Kong, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich, and University of Washington in Seattle-whereby teachers and students, obviously on three different continents and in three different time zones, roughly eight hours apart, tried to "multiply time". Students were asked to design a house for a Chinese painter and a Swiss writer on a small island in Puget Sound near Seattle. In a short and intensive design charrette, students explored in five different phases various dualities associated with the given design problem. In each phase students were asked to select someone else?s design, thus implicitly forming design teams. The paper describes the structure and goals of the studio exercise, the methodologies applied, the resulting design processes, and the lessons learned.
series eCAADe
email hirschberg@tugraz.at
more http://www.paris-valdemarne.archi.fr/archive/ecaade98/html/18kolarevic/index.htm
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id 8569
authors Kurmann, D., Elte, N. and Engeli, M.
year 1997
title Real-Time Modeling with Architectural Space
source CAAD Futures 1997 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-7923-4726-9] München (Germany), 4-6 August 1997, pp. 809-819
summary Space as an architectural theme has been explored in many ways over many centuries; designing the architectural space is a major issue in both architectural education and in the design process. Based on these observations, it follows that computer tools should be available that help architects manipulate and explore space and spatial configurations directly and interactively. Therefore, we have created and extended the computer tool Sculptor. This tool enables the architect to design interactively with the computer, directly in real-time and in three dimensions. We developed the concept of 'space as an element' and integrated it into Sculptor. These combinations of solid and void elements - positive and negative volumes - enable the architect to use the computer already in an early design stage for conceptual design and spatial studies. Similar to solids modeling but much simpler, more intuitive and in real-time this allows the creation of complex spatial compositions in 3D space. Additionally, several concepts, operations and functions are defined inherently. Windows and doors for example are negative volumes that connect other voids inside positive ones. Based on buildings composed with these spaces we developed agents to calculate sound atmosphere and estimate cost, and creatures to test building for fire escape reasons etc. The paper will look at the way to design with space from both an architect's point of view and a computer scientist's. Techniques, possibilities and consequences of this direct void modeling will be explained. It will elaborate on the principle of human machine interaction brought up by our research and used in Sculptor. It will present the possibility to create VRML models directly for the web and show some of the designs done by students using the tool in our CAAD courses.
series CAAD Futures
email kurmann@arch.ethz.ch, elte@arch.ethz.ch, engeli@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 1999/04/06 07:19

_id fa87
authors Kurmann, David
year 1995
title Sculptor - A Tool for Intuitive Architectural Design
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 323-330
summary To manage the complexity in three-dimensional modelling and design in architecture, new approaches and methods are needed in computer based design tools. This paper identifies key factors in designing with computers and presents a computer program called 'Sculptor' for intuitive and direct virtual modelling in architecture. The program focuses on new methods for design in the early stages such as conceptual and abstract designs for massing studies.
keywords Architectural Design., User Interface, Virtual Reality, Distributed Modelling, Intelligent Agents
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/08/03 15:16

_id cfad
authors Kurmann, David
year 1998
title Sculptor - How to Design Space?
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 317-326
summary Architects face a significant lack of computer tools that truly support them in the early, conceptual stages of design. In this paper, we take a look at the reasons for that and propose some solutions. We introduce new human-machine interaction methods that do differ from construction based approaches. We define new spatial interface paradigms as well as new objects and their behavior. Finally we present their implementation in ‘Sculptor’ - a modeling prototype to enable designing in space with space.
keywords Spatial Modeling, Human Computer Interface, Cooperative Design
series CAADRIA
email kurmann@arch.ethz.ch
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:22

_id 6384
authors Kurmann, David
year 1999
title Informotion: Dynamic Representation of Information Structures
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 133-141
summary Information is everywhere. We are flooded by information and one can observe peoples problems handling the amount of information. The relational table as the mean to present information as well as simple html pages are having their obvious depts. Therefore, people are looking into three-dimensional representations and entire virtual environments to visualize data contents. Within this papers it is proposed to visualize information and information structures in a dynamic fashion. Therefore, we will have a look at some principles of dynamic representations as well as the metaphors and methods used to enables dynamic representations. With Autonomous Objects in Sculptor and inforMotion two examples are implemented in our research projects using dynamic data visualization.
series CAADRIA
email kurmann@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2000/01/13 10:25

_id 8c51
authors Schmitt, G., Wenz, F., Kurmann, D., Van der Mark, E.
year 1996
title Toward Virtual Reality in Architecture: Concepts and Scenarios from Architectural Space Laboratory
source Presence, Vol. 4, No. 3, July, pages pp. 267-285
summary Contributed by Bharat Dave (b.dave@architecture.unimelb.edu.au)
keywords 3D City modeling
series other
last changed 2001/06/04 18:23

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