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_id 2e56
authors Coyne, Robert Francis
year 1991
title ABLOOS : an evolving hierarchical design framework
source Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Architecture
summary The research reported in this thesis develops an approach toward a more effective use of hierarchical decomposition in computational design systems. The approach is based on providing designers a convenient interactive means to specify and experiment with the decompositional structure of design problems, rather than having decompositions pre-specified and encoded in the design system. Following this approach, a flexible decomposition capability is combined with an underlying design method to form the basis for an extensible and evolving framework for cooperative (humdcomputer) design. As a testbed for this approach, the ABLOOS framework for layout design is designed and constructed as a hierarchical extension of LOOS.íThe framework enables a layout task to be hierarchically decomposed, and for the LOOS methodology to be applied recursively to layout subtasks at appropriate levels of abstraction within the hierarchy; layout solutions for the subtasks are then recomposed to achieve an overall solution, Research results thus far are promising: ABLOOS has produced high quality solutions for a class of industrial layout design tasks (an analog power board layout with 60 components that have multiple complex constraints on their placement); the adaptability of the framework across domains and disciplines has been demonstrated; and, further development of ABLOOS is underway including its extension to layouts in 2 1/2D space and truly 3D arrangements. The contribution of this work is in demonstrating an effective, flexible and extensible capability for hierarchical decomposition in design. It has also produced a more comprehensive layout system that can serve as a foundation for the further investigation of hierarchical decomposition in a variety of design domains.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 68c8
authors Flemming, U., Coyne, R. and Fenves, S. (et al.)
year 1994
title SEED: A Software Environment to Support the Early Phases in Building Design
source Proceeding of IKM '94, Weimar, Germany, pp. 5-10
summary The SEED project intends to develop a software environment that supports the early phases in building design (Flemming et al., 1993). The goal is to provide support, in principle, for the preliminary design of buildings in all aspects that can gain from computer support. This includes using the computer not only for analysis and evaluation, but also more actively for the generation of designs, or more accurately, for the rapid generation of design representations. A major motivation for the development of SEED is to bring the results of two multi-generational research efforts focusing on `generative' design systems closer to practice: 1. LOOS/ABLOOS, a generative system for the synthesis of layouts of rectangles (Flemming et al., 1988; Flemming, 1989; Coyne and Flemming, 1990; Coyne, 1991); 2. GENESIS, a rule-based system that supports the generation of assemblies of 3-dimensional solids (Heisserman, 1991; Heisserman and Woodbury, 1993). The rapid generation of design representations can take advantage of special opportunities when it deals with a recurring building type, that is, a building type dealt with frequently by the users of the system. Design firms - from housing manufacturers to government agencies - accumulate considerable experience with recurring building types. But current CAD systems capture this experience and support its reuse only marginally. SEED intends to provide systematic support for the storing and retrieval of past solutions and their adaptation to similar problem situations. This motivation aligns aspects of SEED closely with current work in Artificial Intelligence that focuses on case-based design (see, for example, Kolodner, 1991; Domeshek and Kolodner, 1992; Hua et al., 1992).
series other
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

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