CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 21 to 40 of 41

_id 50a1
authors Hoffman, Donald
year 1998
title Visual Intelligence
source Norton Publishing, New York
summary After his stroke, Mr. P still had outstanding memory and intelligence. He could still read and talk, and mixed well with the other patients on his ward. His vision was in most respects normal---with one notable exception: He couldn't recognize the faces of people or animals. As he put it himself, "I can see the eyes, nose, and mouth quite clearly, but they just don't add up. They all seem chalked in, like on a blackboard ... I have to tell by the clothes or by the voice whether it is a man or a woman ...The hair may help a lot, or if there is a mustache ... ." Even his own face, seen in a mirror, looked to him strange and unfamiliar. Mr. P had lost a critical aspect of his visual intelligence. We have long known about IQ and rational intelligence. And, due in part to recent advances in neuroscience and psychology, we have begun to appreciate the importance of emotional intelligence. But we are largely ignorant that there is even such a thing as visual intelligence---that is, until it is severely impaired, as in the case of Mr. P, by a stroke or other insult to visual cortex. The culprit in our ignorance is visual intelligence itself. Vision is normally so swift and sure, so dependable and informative, and apparently so effortless that we naturally assume that it is, indeed, effortless. But the swift ease of vision, like the graceful ease of an Olympic ice skater, is deceptive. Behind the graceful ease of the skater are years of rigorous training, and behind the swift ease of vision is an intelligence so great that it occupies nearly half of the brain's cortex. Our visual intelligence richly interacts with, and in many cases precedes and drives, our rational and emotional intelligence. To understand visual intelligence is to understand, in large part, who we are. It is also to understand much about our highly visual culture in which, as the saying goes, image is everything. Consider, for instance, our entertainment. Visual effects lure us into theaters, and propel films like Star Wars and Jurassic Park to record sales. Music videos usher us before surreal visual worlds, and spawn TV stations like MTV and VH-1. Video games swallow kids (and adults) for hours on end, and swell the bottom lines of companies like Sega and Nintendo. Virtual reality, popularized in movies like Disclosure and Lawnmower Man, can immerse us in visual worlds of unprecedented realism, and promises to transform not only entertainment but also architecture, education, manufacturing, and medicine. As a culture we vote with our time and wallets and, in the case of entertainment, our vote is clear. Just as we enjoy rich literature that stimulates our rational intelligence, or a moving story that engages our emotional intelligence, so we also seek out and enjoy new media that challenge our visual intelligence. Or consider marketing and advertisement, which daily manipulate our buying habits with sophisticated images. Corporations spend millions each year on billboards, packaging, magazine ads, and television commercials. Their images can so powerfully influence our behavior that they sometimes generate controversy---witness the uproar over Joe Camel. If you're out to sell something, understanding visual intelligence is, without question, critical to the design of effective visual marketing. And if you're out to buy something, understanding visual intelligence can help clue you in to what is being done to you as a consumer, and how it's being done. This book is a highly illustrated and accessible introduction to visual intelligence, informed by the latest breakthroughs in vision research. Perhaps the most surprising insight that has emerged from vision research is this: Vision is not merely a matter of passive perception, it is an intelligent process of active construction. What you see is, invariably, what your visual intelligence constructs. Just as scientists intelligently construct useful theories based on experimental evidence, so vision intelligently constructs useful visual worlds based on images at the eyes. The main difference is that the constructions of scientists are done consciously, but those of vision are done, for the most part, unconsciously.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 7e68
authors Holland, J.
year 1992
title Genetic Algorithms
source Scientific America, July 1992
summary Living organisms are consummate problem solvers. They exhibit a versatility that puts the best computer programs to shame. This observation is especially galling for computer scientists, who may spend months or years of intellectual effort on an algorithm, whereas organisms come by their abilities through the apparently undirected mechanism of evolution and natural selection. Pragmatic researchers see evolution's remarkable power as something to be emulated rather than envied. Natural selection eliminates one of the greatest hurdles in software design: specifying in advance all the features of a problem and the actions a program should take to deal with them. By harnessing the mechanisms of evolution, researchers may be able to "breed" programs that solve problems even when no person can fully understand their structure. Indeed, these so-called genetic algorithms have already demonstrated the ability to made breakthroughs in the design of such complex systems as jet engines. Genetic algorithms make it possible to explore a far greater range of potential solutions to a problem than do conventional programs. Furthermore, as researchers probe the natural selection of programs under controlled an well-understood conditions, the practical results they achieve may yield some insight into the details of how life and intelligence evolve in the natural world.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id dee5
authors Koutamanis, Alexander and Mitossi, Vicky
year 2001
title A "spelling" checker for architectural drawings: Grammatical and syntactic analysis in structured representations
source CAADRIA 2001 [Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 1-86487-096-6] Sydney 19-21 April 2001, pp. 369-378
summary CAAD representations for the early design stages have traditionally focused on aspects apparently relating to design creativity. These, however, may be unconnected to the control and analysis of design constraints that affect the further development of the design. The stability and reliability of control and analysis rely on what (despite the dangers of the linguistic analogy) we might call the grammatical and syntactic well-formedness of the representation. The paper reports on the control of grammar and syntax in a representation of spatial and building elements with respect to both the syntagmatic and the paradigmatic dimension.
series CAADRIA
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2001/05/27 16:27

_id ddssar0016
id ddssar0016
authors Koutamanis, Alexander and Mitossi, Vicky
year 2000
title Grammatical and syntactic properties of CAAD representations for the early design stages
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary CAAD representations for the early design stages have traditionally focused on aspects apparently relating to design creativity, such as flexible, effortless and rich geometric modelling. However, modelling capabilities are generally unconnected to the control and analysis of design constraints that affect the further development of the design. These usually refer to functional and spatial aspects that are only implicit in a CAAD representation of design ‘solids’. Moreover, the stability and reliability of control and analysis rely on the grammatical and syntactic quality of the representation. In particular, (a) the grammatical well-formedness of spatial and building primitives, and (b) the syntactic completeness and unambiguity of spatial relations are essential prerequisites to any meaningful analysis of aspects such as fulfilment of programmatic requirements, indoor climate, lighting or human interaction with the built environment. The paper describes a dual spatial and building element representation implemented on top of a standard drawing system. The representation attempts to minimize input requirements, while at the same time providing feedback on the grammatical and syntactic quality of the design description.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id acadia16_344
id acadia16_344
authors Leach, Neil
year 2016
title Digital Tool Thinking: Object-Oriented Ontology versus New Materialism
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 344-351
summary Within contemporary philosophy, two apparently similar movements have gained attention recently, New Materialism and Object Oriented Ontology. Although these movements have quite distinct genealogies, they overlap on one key issue: they are both realist movements that focus on the object. In contrast to much twentieth-century thinking centered on the subject, these two movements address the seemingly overlooked question of the object. In shifting attention away from the anthropocentrism of Humanism, both movements can be seen to subscribe to the broad principles of Posthumanism. Are these two movements, however, as similar as they first appear? And how might they be seen to differ in their approach to digital design? This paper is an attempt to evaluate and critique the recent strain of Object Oriented Ontology and question its validity. It does so by tracing the differences between OOO and New Materialism, specifically through the work of the neo-Heideggerian philosopher Graham Harman and the post-Deleuzian philosopher Manuel DeLanda, and by focusing on the question of the ‘tool’ in particular. The paper opens up towards the question of the digital tool, questioning the connection between Object Oriented Ontology and Object Oriented Programming, and introducing the theory of affordances as an alternative to the stylistic logic of ‘parametricism’ as a way of understanding the impact of digital tools on architectural production. The paper concludes that we need to recognize the crucial differences between the work of DeLanda and Harman, and that—if nothing else—within progressive digital design circles, we should be cautious of Harman’s brand of Object Oriented Ontology, not least because of its heavy reliance on the work of the German philosopher, Martin Heidegger.
keywords digital tools, obect-oriented ontology, new materialism, sensate systems
series ACADIA
type paper
email leachneil@gmail.com
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id a9f0
authors Lentz, Uffe
year 1994
title New Tools: New Architecture
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, p. 217
summary Our young students have no strong bindings to the tools and methods of our profession. With their open-minded access to the media, they often try to do things, which are surprising and new. Things which would have been impossible to think of without a computer. They are inspired of apparently unknown design-options, which they find in CAD-tools, or they are exploring possibilities in 'strange' combinations of media, not unknown from Television-commercials and music-videos. This Blitz-session will show some students' projects in a very short while. The common thing is, that the students have broken rules, that the teacher never realised were rules, because of his (my) traditional education. One student uses a solid modelling -tool for inspiration, - another uses an auto-tracing tool to generate the concept - and a group of students used a combination of video, grabbing and 3D-modelling to generate new architecture.
series eCAADe
email uffe.lentz@a-aarhus.dk
last changed 2003/04/01 19:04

_id 6e9f
authors Muñoz, Patricia Laura and López Coronel, Juan
year 1999
title About the Need of Stopping in the Road: the Fruitful Pause in a Fertile Course
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 93-97
summary Our burdened end of the century seems to demand vertiginous progress, without pauses, frequently without even asking where this course leads. What is most important is to go further, is not to be left behind. In this view, computer science offers more alternatives in less time. However, its greatest risk is to make us covet more, without even trying to inquire what is its value or sense. After working in some researches on generation of forms, we were specially attracted by some of them. Instead of going further in the study of the new generative methods available, we decided to make a pause to look back at those forms we had already obtained. We decided to use computer instruments to understand more deeply forms that we apparently knew. This technology offered us the possibility of visualizing extraordinary forms, of exploring multiple series of curves hidden in their surface. By means of this work, we promote the need of making a pause in our work, in order to try to know intensively the object of our troubles and inquiries, giving it the indispensable time to enjoy it completely.
series SIGRADI
email pamun@teletel.com.ar, dable@infomatic.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 208caadria2004
id 208caadria2004
authors Paul Murty and Terry Purcell
year 2004
title Discoveries Throughout Conceptual Design
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 319-334
summary This paper describes current progress of an interview study of architects which considers how these individuals design, focusing on breakthroughs and unexpected discoveries made throughout conceptual design. The study considers creative outcomes that occur while these individuals are not intentionally designing, as well as when they are, with the intention of identifying and evaluating evidence of latent creative activity. While not described in this paper, issues of insightfulness, based on a Gestalt perspective, are also considered in the study. The completed interviews described in the paper suggest that, in order to achieve breakthroughs, designers adopt distinctive methods of disengaging from currently unproductive designing. These may be categorized by degree and type of disengagement, or subsequent re-engagement. In general, disengaging, instead of persisting in designing, when apparently stuck, appears to be the rule rather than the exception. Statements by the interviewees suggest that discoveries during, or just after, times when they are not actively designing, referred to as cold discoveries, are more important than is currently recognized, which is scarcely at all. Statements describing interviewee experiences of discovery and providing indications of the genesis of discoveries are included in the paper. The paper discusses implications of the wide range of perceptions and experiences of each individual. One interesting finding is that individuals appear to experience and appreciate cold discoveries regardless of differences in key aspects of the way they design, described in the paper. This suggests that the genesis of cold discoveries may be as complex as that of discoveries in general.
series CAADRIA
email paul@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2004/05/20 16:46

_id 0fba
authors Quarendon, P. and Woodwark, J.R.
year 1987
title Three-Dimensional Models for Computer Graphics
source [2] 17 p. : col. ill. Winchester, UK: IBM UK Scientific Center, May, 1987. IBM UKSC Report 158. includes bibliography
summary The various object models which are in use for generating computer graphics are reviewed and some of their advantages and disadvantages discussed. In particular, methods of overcoming the apparently unpromising performance characteristics of set-theoretic solid models are described. A number of examples are given showing the use of set- theoretic models in graphics applications. It is concluded that, while these models were developed for computer-aided design, they will have increasing use in computer graphics
keywords geometric modeling, methods, performance, evaluation, solid modeling,boolean operations, computer graphics, B- rep
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 93d5
authors Regis, Héctor and Cardozo, Julio
year 2001
title MULTI-MEDIA-MIRADA / CONECTA-DESCONECTA (Multi-Media-Watched / Connect-Disconnects)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 246-247
summary This work studies the creative process as information that must be recovered, redefined and recreated, using different multimedia tools. The Club de Grabado de Montevideo has made exploratory works combining images, texts and music in an apparently connectionless juxtaposition. For the text, we summoned contemporary national poets of different generations. And, we use digitally manipulated photographies and computer graphics that register, in the work, its creative process. This lead to a new dynamics in the way to read “virtual books”: it unfolds in a succession of “pages” in which each page constitutes a microcosm that finds unit in the diversity.
series SIGRADI
email hregis@clubdegrabado.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:58

_id c804
authors Richens, P.
year 1994
title Does Knowledge really Help?
source G. Carrara and Y.E. Kalay (Eds.), Knowledge-Based Computer-Aided Architectural Design, Elsevier
summary The Martin Centre CADLAB has recently been established to investigate software techniques that could be of practical importance to architects within the next five years. In common with most CAD researchers, we are interested in the earlier, conceptual, stages of design, where commercial CAD systems have had little impact. Our approach is not Knowledge-Based, but rather focuses on using the computer as a medium for design and communication. This leads to a concentration on apparently superficial aspects such as visual appearance, the dynamics of interaction, immediate feedback, plasticity. We try to avoid building-in theoretical attitudes, and to reduce the semantic content of our systems to a low level on the basis that flexibility and intelligence are inversely related; and that flexibility is more important. The CADLAB became operational in January 1992. First year work in three areas – building models, experiencing architecture, and making drawings – is discussed.
series other
more http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/pubs/
last changed 2003/03/05 12:19

_id daff
authors Richens, P.
year 1994
title CAD Research at the Martin Centre
source Automation in Construction, No. 3
summary The Martin Centre CADLAB has recently been established to investigate software techniques that could be of practical importance to architects within the next five years. In common with most CAD researchers, we are interested in the earlier, conceptual, stages of design, where commercial CAD systems have had little impact. Our approach is not Knowledge-Based, but rather focuses on using the computer as a medium for design and communication. This leads to a concentration on apparently superficial aspects such as visual appearance, the dynamics of interaction, immediate feedback, plasticity. We try to avoid building-in theoretical attitudes, and to reduce the semantic content of our systems to a low level on the basis that flexibility and intelligence are inversely related; and that flexibility is more important. The CADLAB became operational in January 1992. First year work in three areas – building models, experiencing architecture, and making drawings – is discussed.
series journal
email paul.richens@arct.cam.ac.uk
more http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/pubs/pdfs/rich94a.pdf
last changed 2000/03/05 18:05

_id c4e4
authors Robinson, Julia W.
year 1990
title Architectural Research : Incorporating Myth and Science
source Journal of Architectural Education November, 1990. vol. 44: pp. 20-32 : ill. includes bibliography.
summary Despite an apparently common assumption that science and myth are totally incompatible approaches to architecture, especially as related to architectural design, the author argues that science and myth are both explanations of phenomena, each different, but both valid. Positing the desirability of a research and design process that would take advantage of both approaches, it addresses the problems of existing conceptual categories and the possible productive relationship between myth and science for architecture. Anthropology is then proposed as a paradigm for an architectural research that could address both science and myth, and this is illustrated with examples of research and design studio instruction
keywords education, architecture, research, design process
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 504a
authors Rodrigo Alvarado, García
year 1999
title Design-Based on VR-Modeling of Environemntal Conditions
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 126-129
summary The research on CAD has been looking for a long time a creative contribution to architectural design, including recently the use of virtual-reality as an immersive modeling system, but without much practical results. However, contemporary architecture is increasingly including digital characteristics based more on cultural influences than on the use of electronic tools. This shows an evolution of the discipline in relation to digital media and apparently distant from environmental concerns. But the works and reflexions reveal a common convergence in the role of body in architecture as a pivot between virtual and local dimension of design. Based on that relationship we propose to take advantage of virtual-reality for modeling environmental conditions of the location in order to guide architectural design, using for example the potential of representing characteristics not visible in reality or to simulate time cycles. Sun displacement, wind direction, temperature ranges, topography and landscape are specific conditions in design that define energy consumption and human comfort. Such characteristics can establish optimal shapes crossing the different variables with timelines. VR-modeling and interactive control allow an spatial evaluation of environmentally efficient forms. That is showed through an exercise of housing in different locations of Chile. This merger between digital media and ecological concerns represents a crossing of contemporary cultural trends to motivate exploration of new geometries, supported on the potential of technology and on sustainable human development
series SIGRADI
email rgarcia@pegsasus.dci.ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id 45f3
id 45f3
authors Russell Lowe
year 2007
title COMPUTER GAMING, BIOTECHNOLOGY AND ARCHITECTURE: EMBEDDING THE INTERSECTION WITHIN AN ARCHITECTURAL CURRICULUM.
source AASA2007
summary Today, leading computer games provide real time environments including spaces, objects and characters that range (by manipulating an enormous array of parameters and being subject to simulations of real world physics) from the super realistic to the super delirious. Biotechnology, although apparently unrelated, also requires the manipulation of information in space and time and promises to affect environments in a range of ways that is at least as extreme. The opportunities suggested by an intersection between Architecture, Computer Gaming and Biotechnology were instrumental in the creation of courses and topics for students in first year right through to students studying toward a Masters degree. This paper reflects on and critically reviews the implementation, strategies and outcomes of embedding the intersection between Computer Gaming and Biotechnology within an Architectural curriculum. It draws from the experience of over 500 students, two Universities and major technological shifts. It develops the notion of the experiment in design. In contrast with the introduction of computer gaming technology into a core first year course, that had the underlying aim of including these technologies as a part of a general design curriculum, the introduction of issues connecting architecture with biotechnology (through computer gaming technology) reflects the specific research agenda of the author and is not intended for general application across an architectural curriculum. For more general application it could be seen as a strategy to promote cross disciplinary collaboration through the concept of the ‘boundary object’.
keywords Architecture, Computer gaming, Biotechnology, Design Experiment, Boundary Object
series other
type normal paper
email russell.lowe@unsw.edu.au
more http://www.russelllowe.com/publications/aasa2007/aasa2007.htm
last changed 2008/04/28 05:48

_id acadia05_036
id acadia05_036
authors Senagala, Mahesh
year 2005
title Building is a Network for Living in: Toward New Architectures
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 36-47
summary Our societies today are beginning to think, communicate, interact and live differently as everything in the human world is beginning to be networked wirelessly at the speed of light with everything else in the world (including architecture). This article looks at the big picture and outlines a series of recent developments in digital technologies that would enable architecture to become sensate, supple and globally networked at the speed of light. New thinking, new commerce, new polity, and new architectures are emerging out of the apparently disparate yet closely related design and technological inventions. We are on the verge of moving from the outmoded notions of space and time to the post-spatial notion of sensate and supple space-time.
series ACADIA
email mahesh.senagala@utsa.edu
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id 305caadria2004
id 305caadria2004
authors Somen Chakraborty
year 2004
title Archimetrics: A Necessary Discipline for Obtaining Objective Values From Architectural Subjective Values
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 443-452
summary If we are serious about using CAAD then many subjective design steps normally performed by the architect apparently creatively using subjective values are to be performed by the computer. To fulfil this purpose a tremendous research work is necessary to transform subjective design methods and values to objective design methods and values which should give realistic design solutions not less efficient than that produced by human being. For this purpose it has become imperative now to develop new methods or borrow methods from other disciplines like statistics and psychometrics so that this kind of transformation can be done effectively. It appears that this may form a distinct discipline by itself which may be termed as “archimetrics” keeping parity with similar terms like psychometrics, econometrics, anthropometrics etc. With this view in mind the author has attempted to develop few methods and concepts by virtue of which some of the subjective design methods and values can be transformed into objective design methods and values. The author describes here some basic concepts required for this purpose.
series CAADRIA
email somen_c@eudoramail.com
last changed 2004/05/20 17:39

_id 41a6
authors Thomas, Wolfgang
year 1993
title Oberhausen ”Center” — Marketstreet under One Roof
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 99-108
summary Oberhausen/Germany is said to be the birth place of the Ruhr industry. At present we can witness a unique structural change in the history of this city. Well into the sixties still an internationally renowned industrial location for coal and steel Oberhausen shall, according to the plans of local and regional governments, be developed into a center of service industries of top European niveau within the next three years. This development was and is the logical consequence of its salient position in the nexus of important European traffic routes. If one includes nearby Holland which is situated to the northwest Oberhausen can draw on the resources of a substantial market area. Attractive services provided, it can and shall be developed into an international center of attraction for more than 13 million people within a travel time radius of only 60 minutes. In its present borders, the town comprises the communities of Sterkrade, Osterfeld and old Oberhausen which had been independent up to 1929. On their joint boundaries a competitive metropolis of coal related and heavy industry developed, and that particularly after the Second World War. Oberhausen had excellent connections on water, rail and road with all the supraregional transportation networks. The continuous economic power of the settlement area could, apparently, not be questioned. At the beginning of the sixties Oberhausen was hit the harder by the downfall of this seemingly safe economic branch. Up to 1992 almost 40 000 jobs were lost in the city. Within 30 years Oberhausen lost everything it had gained in the years since its foundation. In the heart of the city a huge industrial wasteland was left.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id ddssar0029
id ddssar0029
authors Vries, B. de, Jessurun, J. and Engeli, M.
year 2000
title Development of an intuitive 3D sketching tool
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary 3D sketching is a confusing description of an architectural design means. It is confusing, or even worse apparently wrong, because traditional sketching is inherently a two dimensional activity. Though the final stages of design are currently well support by CAD packages, almost every architect prefers paper and pencil for the early sketching phases. The challenge is to develop a (computer supported) design tool that is as direct and intuitive as paper and pencil. The computer enables us to directly map our spatial mental model into 3D rendered images. As such a new kind of design means is created which is best indicated as an intuitive 3D sketching tool. Within the VR-DIS research programme of the Design Systems group of the Eindhoven University of Technology a tool named DDDoolz has been developed as an experimental 3D sketching tool. This paper will report on the preliminary phase in which several input devices such as mouse, bird and voice were tested. For this purpose simple prototype applications were implemented. Building upon these experiences a functional brief was defined for the sketching tool. The system design will be elaborated in this paper using OO schema techniques. Because of its limited yet powerful functionality, a comprehensive system description can be presented. The application has been used in a first years CAD course. Students’ experiences will be discussed demonstrating the strengths and weaknesses of DDDoolz. In conclusion, a list of improvements will be presented and the future directions are indicated that will be followed in regard of the continuing research on design and decision support tools.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 672b
authors Vélez Jahn, Gonzalo
year 2000
title Arquitectura Virtual: Fronteras (Virtual Architecture: The Border)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 126-131
summary This paper seeks to provide an updated vision about activities occurring in the area of Virtual Architecture, while identifying an important trend in that area, and pointing a way towards future development of architectural objects based on its ultimate virtual existence. It also forecasts the future rise and boom of the architectural designers of the virtual. As such, this paper is structured according to three basic parts. (1) Basic concepts, environment and evolution. (2) Current state and limitation of virtual architecture. . (3) Foreseeable future- new professional opportunities. // As the focal point in this presentation, this third part presents recent advances identified in the research activity concerning the subject of PermanentVirtual Architecture: multi-user models, inhabited television, mixed realities among others. A number of considerations are also included regarding new design activities opportunities in this new area apparently opening to architectural designers within a foreseeable future.
series SIGRADI
email gvelez@reacciun.ve
last changed 2016/03/10 09:02

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