CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 1 to 20 of 186

_id ga0132
id ga0132
authors Abe, Yoshiyuki
year 2001
title Beyond the math visualization - Geometrica and Stochastica
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Mathematically controlled imaging process provides attractive results because of its infinite scaling capabilities with some other elements that contribute to the visualization. Its global/local and precise manipulation of parameters holds potential for realizing an unpredictable horizon of imagery. When it meets the artist's taste, this method could be a strong enough system of creation, and I have been producing images using the surfaces of hyperbolic paraboloid. On the other hand, a method absolutely free from the geometric parameter manipulation is possible with a stochastic process [1]. Like the technique of pendulum in photography, while its production rate of acceptable result is very low, its potential of generating a strong visual message is also very attractive. It is possible to set stochastic elements at any stage of the process, and conditional probability on those elements, or the hierarchy of probability management characterizes the probability distribution. Math space has no light. No gravity. No color on the math surfaces. And the math equation providesonly the boundary in 3D or higher mathematical dimensions. The fact means that artists can keep artistic reality with their unique tastes in colors on the surface and light sources, and this is the most important element of the math based imaging. Being able to give artists' own choice of colors and that the artist may take only right ones from the results of a stochastic process guarantee the motif and aesthetics of artist could be reflected onto the work.
series other
email y.abe@ieee.org
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ascaad2014_033
id ascaad2014_033
authors Al-Mousa , Sukainah Adnan
year 2014
title Temporary Architecture: An urban mirage
source Digital Crafting [7th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2014 / ISBN 978-603-90142-5-6], Jeddah (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia), 31 March - 3 April 2014, pp. 405-413
summary One of the emerging multidisciplinary contemporary art practices is interactive installation art, which is concerned with constructing a temporary artistic environment that is digital, responsive and engaging. It is usually displayed within existing architectural context whether indoor in a gallery space or outdoor in a public space. Recent examples of such art projects show that interactivity and illusion are effectively present and highly influential in the perception and memory of the place. A digital display on a building façade can remain attached to the history of the site in the spectator’s memory even after the display is removed. An interactive space that involves body response and emotional sensory interaction can determine the narrative perceived from the experience. These trends seemingly bring together the physical context and the digital space to contain the spectator. The two mediums are merged to provide a new genre of space, hence a new mode of perception where the art space mediates people’s movement and overlay the context with new meanings. Multiple backgrounds are involved in the creative process of interactive installation art, all of which involve examining various concepts through artistic engagement with temporary spaces. Here, particularly because of interactivity and immerseveness, the spectator becomes part of the performance (the subject); with his moving and reacting he activates the narrative and probably gives it its shape. This paper aims to explore the potentials of the digital spatial display to enhance or weaken our sense of belonging to the surrounding environments while creating an illusionary space within the real physical one. It also aims to discuss how this influence would affect the memory of the mixed experience; the installation being digital, temporary and illusive and the space being physical, permanent and real. What happens to the “spectator” when contained by the digital-interactive and the physical medium(s)?. In order to unfold the mentioned questions, the study uses theories of perception and performance reflected on live case studies of recent art projects where the researcher becomes a member of the audience and an observer at the same time in order to trace the journey inside this new medium. In an era where time is being more difficult to grasp and identities of visual culture is becoming more difficult to define, temporary responsive environments can provide some openings where space becomes durational, yet, influential, and where people’s movements become more meaningful in the visual terrain.
series ASCAAD
email s.almousa@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 2016/02/15 12:09

_id acadia17_72
id acadia17_72
authors Alfaiate, Pedro; Caetano, In?s; Leit?o, António
year 2017
title Luna Moth: Supporting Creativity in the Cloud
source ACADIA 2017: DISCIPLINES & DISRUPTION [Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-96506-1] Cambridge, MA 2-4 November, 2017), pp. 72-81
summary Algorithmic design allows architects to design using a programming-based approach. Current algorithmic design environments are based on existing computer-aided design applications or building information modeling applications, such as AutoCAD, Rhinoceros 3D, or Revit, which, due to their complexity, fail to give architects the immediate feedback they need to explore algorithmic design. In addition, they do not address the current trend of moving applications to the cloud to improve their availability. To address these problems, we propose a software architecture for an algorithmic design integrated development environment (IDE), based on web technologies, that is more interactive than competing algorithmic design IDEs. Besides providing an intuitive editing interface which facilitates programming tasks for architects, its performance can be an order of magnitude faster than current algorithmic design IDEs, thus supporting real-time feedback with more complex algorithmic design programs. Moreover, our solution also allows architects to export the generated model to their preferred computer-aided design applications. This results in an algorithmic design environment that is accessible from any computer, while offering an interactive editing environment that integrates into the architect’s workflow.
keywords design methods; information processing; generative system; computational / artistic cultures
series ACADIA
email pedro.a.f.alfaiate@gmail.com
last changed 2017/10/17 09:12

_id ascaad2007_042
id ascaad2007_042
authors Ameireh, O.M.
year 2007
title Abstract Thinking: An Introduction to Creative Thinking in Basic Design
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 527-542
summary This paper critically examines the nature of the dramatic increase in the number of students accepted in schools of architecture in Jordan, and the contradictory decrease in their artistic, creative, thought process, projects problem solving and other skills. The paper also reviews architectural curriculum and courses to identify weaknesses in handling the changes and ultimately within these constraints and in order to handle the students variable potentials, abilities and contradictions, certain exercises in the basic design course are devised in ways that; reduces its dependency on learnable manual skills and conceptual thinking; uses teaching techniques that correlates and incorporates Arts, Architecture and Sciences as complementary topics; approaches and reaches creativity as a procedure not a gift; transfers and travels easily between complexities and simplicities, between natural and artificial intelligence, between abstract and relative thinking; employ geometries and design tools as the main structure of any composition; makes self evaluations of choices, decisions and variables easier. Taking Abstraction as a framework in solving the problem of the exercises gave answers and solution to many problems that was not easy solving under the conventional ways of design.
series ASCAAD
email oma_amir2000@yahoo.co.uk
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id sigradi2012_192
id sigradi2012_192
authors Andres, Carolina Reichert; Minuzzi, Reinilda
year 2012
title Cultmapas urbanos [Urban cultmaps]
source SIGraDi 2012 [Proceedings of the 16th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Brasil - Fortaleza 13-16 November 2012, pp. 38-42
summary This research aims to address the catalog urban interventions as graffiti, stencil and sticker spotted in association with the city. As a result, they develop artistic urban mappings which assemble a structure marking the artistic manifestations. The urban arts, are georeferenced and eventually become part of a catalografia which can be viewed on the web entitled Cultmap art.
keywords arte e tecnologia, mapeamentos artísticos, graffiti, web arte
series SIGRADI
email reichertcarolina@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2008_080
id sigradi2008_080
authors Andrés, Roberto
year 2008
title Hybrid Art > Synthesized Architecture
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary This paper investigates possible intersections between some contemporary artistic modalities and architectural practice. At first, it describes and discusses different uses of art in architectural history. Through the analyzes of Le Corbusier’s artistic and architectural practices, it observes the limits of looking at art as only ‘inspiration’ for architectural form and points to the necessity of surpassing this formal approach. More than bringing pictorial ‘inspiration’, art, as a experimental field, can change our architectural procedures and approaches - a much richer and powerful addition to the development of architecture. It discusses then, the confluence of architecture, information and communication technologies. Very commonly present in our contemporary life, not only on the making of architecture – computer drawings and modeling of extravagant buildings – nor in ‘automated rooms’ of the millionaire’s houses. Televisions, telephones and computers leave the walls of our houses “with as many holes as a Swiss cheese”, as Flusser has pointed. The architecture has historically manipulated the way people interact, but this interaction now has been greatly changed by new technologies. Since is inevitable to think the contemporary world without them, it is extreme urgent that architects start dealing with this whole universe in a creative way. Important changes in architecture occur after professionals start to research and experiment with different artistic medias, not limiting their visions to painting and sculpture. The main hypothesis of this paper is that the experiments with new media art can bring the field of architecture closer to information and communication technologies. This confluence can only take form when architects rise questions about technology based interaction and automation during their creative process, embodying these concepts into the architecture repertoire. An educational experience was conducted in 2007 at UFMG Architecture School, in Brazil, with the intention of this activity was to allow students to research creatively with both information technology and architecture. The students’ goal was to create site-specific interventions on the school building, using physical and digital devices. Finally, the paper contextualizes this experience with the discussion above exposed. Concluding with an exposition of the potentialities of some contemporary art modalities (specially the hybrid ones) in qualifying architectural practices.
keywords Architecture; Information and Communication Technologies; Digital Art; Site Specific Art; Architectural Learning.
series SIGRADI
email robertoandres@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ecaade2008_153
id ecaade2008_153
authors Andrés, Roberto
year 2008
title Hybrid Art > Synthesized Architecture
source Architecture in Computro [26th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-7-2] Antwerpen (Belgium) 17-20 September 2008, pp. 267-274
summary This paper investigates possible intersections between some contemporary artistic modalities and architectural practice. It observes the limits of looking at art as only ‘inspiration’ for architectural form and points to the necessity of surpassing this formal approach. It discusses then, the confluence of architecture, information and communication technologies. The architecture has historically mediated the way people interact, but this interaction now has been greatly changed by new technologies. Then, it analyses the hypothesis that the experiments with new media art can bring the field of architecture closer to information and communication technologies. An educational experience is presented, aiming to verify some points discussed on the text. Concluding with an exposition of the potentialities of some hybrid art modalities in qualifying architectural practices.
keywords Architecture, Information and Communication Technologies, Digital Art, Site Specific Art, Architectural Learning
series eCAADe
email andres@superficie.org
last changed 2008/09/09 13:55

_id ga9922
id ga9922
authors Annunziato, M. and Pierucci, P.
year 1999
title The Art of Emergence
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Since several years, the term emergence is mentioned in the paradigm of chaos and complexity. Following this approach, complex system constituted by multitude of individual develop global behavioral properties on the base of local chaotic interactions (self-organization). These theories, developed in scientific and philosophical milieus are rapidly spreading as a "way of thinking" in the several fields of cognitive activities. According to this "way of thinking" it is possible revise some fundamental themes as the economic systems, the cultural systems, the scientific paths, the communication nets under a new approach where nothing is pre-determined, but the global evolution is determined by specific mechanisms of interaction and fundamental events (bifurcation). With a jump in scale of the life, also other basic concepts related to the individuals as intelligence, consciousness, psyche can be revised as self-organizing phenomena. Such a conceptual fertility has been the base for the revision of the artistic activities as flexible instruments for the investigation of imaginary worlds, metaphor of related real worlds. In this sense we claim to the artist a role of "researcher". Through the free exploration of new concepts, he can evoke qualities, configurations and hypothesis which have an esthetical and expressive value and in the most significant cases, they can induce nucleation of cultural and scientific bifurcation. Our vision of the art-science relation is of cooperative type instead of the conflict of the past decades. In this paper we describe some of the most significant realized artworks in order to make explicit the concepts and basic themes. One of the fundamental topics is the way to generate and think to the artwork. Our characterization is to see the artwork not as a static finished product, but as an instance or a dynamic sequence of instances of a creative process which continuously evolves. In this sense, the attention is focused on the "generative idea" which constitutes the envelop of the artworks generable by the process. In this approach the role of technology (computers, synthesizers) is fundamental to create the dimension of the generative environment. Another characterizing aspect of our artworks is derived by the previous approach and specifically related to the interactive installations. The classical relation between artist, artwork and observers is viewed as an unidirectional flux of messages from the artist to the observer through the artwork. In our approach artist, artwork and observer are autonomous entities provided with own personality which jointly intervene to determine the creative paths. The artist which generate the environment in not longer the "owner" of the artwork; simply he dialectically bring the generative environment (provided by a certain degree of autonomy) towards cultural and creative "void" spaces (not still discovered). The observers start from these platforms to generate other creative paths, sometimes absolutely unexpected , developing their new dialectical relations with the artwork itself. The results derived by these positions characterize the expressive elements of the artworks (images, sequences and sounds) as the outcomes of emergent behavior or dynamics both in the sense of esthetical shapes emergent from fertile generative environments, either in terms of emergent relations between artist, artwork and observer, either in terms of concepts which emerge by the metaphor of artificial worlds to produce imaginary hypothesis for the real worlds.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ga0013
id ga0013
authors Annunziato, Mauro and Pierucci, Piero
year 2000
title Artificial Worlds, Virtual Generations
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The progress in the scientific understanding/simulation of the evolution mechanisms and the first technological realizations (artificial life environments, robots, intelligent toys, self reproducing machines, agents on the web) are creating the base of a new age: the coming of the artificial beings and artificial societies. Although this aspect could seems a technological conquest, by our point of view it represent the foundation of a new step in the human evolution. The anticipation of this change is the development of a new cultural paradigm inherited from the theories of evolution and complexity: a new way to think to the culture, aesthetics and intelligence seen as emergent self-organizing qualities of a collectivity evolved along the time through genetic and language evolution. For these reasons artificial life is going to be an anticipatory and incredibly creative area for the artistic expression and imagination. In this paper we try to correlate some elements of the present research in the field of artificial life, art and technological grow up in order to trace a path of development for the creation of digital worlds where the artificial beings are able to evolve own culture, language and aesthetics and they are able to interact con the human people.Finally we report our experience in the realization of an interactive audio-visual art installation based on two connected virtual worlds realized with artificial life environments. In these worlds,the digital individuals can interact, reproduce and evolve through the mechanisms of genetic mutations. The real people can interact with the artificial individuals creating an hybrid ecosystem and generating emergent shapes, colors, sound architectures and metaphors for imaginary societies, virtual reflections of the real worlds.
series other
email plancton@plancton.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id caadria2005_a_1a_b
id caadria2005_a_1a_b
authors B. Senyapili, I. Basa
year 2005
title RECONCILING COMPUTER AND HAND: THE CASE OF AUTHOR IDENTITY IN DESIGN PRESENTATIONS
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 13-22
summary As computers were newly emerging in the field of architectural design, it was claimed that the impact of computers would change the way architects design and present. However, within the course of computer use in design, although the field of architectural practice might have been altered extremely, in architectural education there still seems to be a bond to conventional mind-hand-paper relation. One of the reasons for that bond is the fact that although being r 1000 elated to many technologies, architecture essentially positions itself around an artistic core that is still fed with conventional modes of creation. Architectural education aims at adopting and working on this very core. One of the major contributors in the formation of this core is the presence of author identity. This paper makes a critical approach to computers in terms of expressing author identity in design presentations especially during design education. We believe that the author identity is important in design education in terms of identifying the potential and skills of the student. Especially in design education the final step of design process turns out to be the presentation, unlike architectural practice where the presented design is actually built. Within this conception, two different studies were held in an educational environment with 160 design students and 20 design instructors. The results of both studies pointed at the fact that the digital opportunities that exist for design education should evolve around preserving and underlining the author identity in design presentations.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email burcu@bilkent.edu.tr, basa@bilkent.edu.tr
last changed 2006/04/17 16:00

_id acadia17_128
id acadia17_128
authors Bacharidou, Maroula
year 2017
title Touch, See, Make: Employing Active Touch in Computational Making
source ACADIA 2017: DISCIPLINES & DISRUPTION [Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-96506-1] Cambridge, MA 2-4 November, 2017), pp. 128-137
summary In architectural education and practice, we don’t come in physical contact with what we make until the later stages of the design process. This vision-oriented approach to design is something deeply rooted in architectural practice: from Alberti’s window to the screens of our computers, design has traditionally been more of a visual and less of a hands-on process. The vision of the presented study is that if we want to understand the way we make in order to improve tools for computational design and making, we need to understand how our ability to make things is enhanced by both our visual and tactile mechanisms. Bringing the notion of active touch from psychology into the design studio, I design and execute a series of experiments investigating how seeing, touching, or seeing and touching exhibit different sensory competencies, and how these competencies are expressed through the process of making. The subjects of the experiment are asked to tactilely, visually, or tactilely and visually observe a three-dimensional object, create descriptions of its composition, and to remake it based on their experience of it using plastic materials. After the execution of the experiment, I analyze twenty-one reproductions of the original object; I point to ways in which touch can detect scale and proportions more accurately than vision, while vision can detect spatial components more efficiently than touch; I then propose ways in which this series of experiments can lead to the creation of new design and making tools.
keywords education society & culture; computational / artistic culture;s hybrid practices; digital craft; manual craft
series ACADIA
email maroulab@mit.edu
last changed 2017/10/17 09:12

_id 6357
id 6357
authors Bahman Kalantari
year 2004
title POLYNOMIOGRAPHY IN ART AND DESIGN
source Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference of Mathematics & Design, Special Edition of the Journal of Mathematics & Design, Volume 4, No.1, pp. 305-311.
summary As polynomiography gains more recognition its potential applications in art and design will become more evident. Polynomiography is the art and science of visualization in the approximation of zeros of polynomials. In this paper we will demonstrate some of its applications in art and design and show that although its basis is mathematical, artists and designers can learn to work with it just as they do with any other artistic tool. Indeed polynomiography has enormous range of applications. Although the main products are two-dimensional images they could also inspire three-dimensional architectural deigns. The paper will demonstrate some particular applications of polynomiography, ranging from artistic designs, to carpet and fabric designs, to animation. Within the realm of art and design, polynomiography also finds many educational applications.
series other
type normal paper
email kalantari@cs.rutgers.edu
last changed 2005/04/07 13:46

_id sigradi2018_1417
id sigradi2018_1417
authors Bambozzi, Lucas
year 2018
title The Invisible Around: Art And Informational Space [The Unstable Place]
source SIGraDi 2018 [Proceedings of the 22nd Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISSN: 2318-6968] Brazil, São Carlos 7 - 9 November 2018, pp. 1128-1133
summary The paper discusses variants of informational spaces, permeated by connectivity and communication flow. The approach considers the 'place' as a field of semantic migrations, it seeks to investigate an architectural space that tends to include invisible aspects in its constitution, affected by a set of recent communication technologies. It comments on creative processes and artistic experiments investigating ways to "see" or visualize electromagnetic fields, radio waves, wi-fi and cellular signals generated by media in circulation spaces, in convergences of crossing signs and systems.
keywords Informational space; Electromagnetic fields; Obsolescence; Mobility; Context specificity
series SIGraDi
email lbambozzi@usp.br
last changed 2019/05/20 09:13

_id sigradi2015_7.184
id sigradi2015_7.184
authors Barber, Gabriela; Lafluf, Marcos
year 2015
title New Media Art; an approach to videomapping
source SIGRADI 2015 [Proceedings of the 19th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - vol. 1 - ISBN: 978-85-8039-135-0] Florianópolis, SC, Brasil 23-27 November 2015, pp. 283-291.
summary This approach to the videomapping technique and theory rises from the experience in the Vidialab environment. Aiming to generate a quality input in the knowledge of this technical and artistic practice that is closely linked to advanced digitalization and digital design, we have limited this study to the local state of the art of it in order to get quality results. The contribution to the unavoidable debate of a practice that involves technology, art, design, architecture and communication is our foremost objective.
series SIGRADI
email gbarber@farq.edu.uy
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 62c0
authors Barrallo, Javier and Iglesias, Alberto
year 1996
title Cybersculpture
source Approaches to Computer Aided Architectural Composition [ISBN 83-905377-1-0] 1996, pp. 35-43
summary From the first artistic expressions of mankind, the Mathematics has influence the shapes and proportions presents in the different artistic disciplines. The coming of Abstract art and modern Mathematics at the beginning of the century supposed a complete renovation of the way of understand the relationship between Mathematics and Art, reinforced by the huge expansion of computers nowadays. Chaos Theory or Fractal Geometry constitute examples of this tendencies, that normally are expressed in the two dimensional plane. The idea of this work consists on the utilisation of a series of elements from the contemporaneous Mathematics to express them in an artistic way in the three dimensional space. The result is a family of objects that we have called CYBERSCULPTURES, due to their sculptural character and the fact that they have Internet as their virtual museum.
series other
last changed 1999/04/08 15:16

_id sigradi2009_887
id sigradi2009_887
authors Barría Chateau, Hernán Alberto; Rodrigo García Alvarado; Cecilia Poblete Arrendondo
year 2009
title Anarquitectura Digital [Digital Anarchitecture]
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary This article reviews the work and the artistic and architectural context of the artist Gordon Matta-Clark. It checks the context as well as the urban and social conditions of his interventions, to place these works in contemporary culture. In particular this paper analyzes “Splitting”, Matta-Clark´s work that synthesizes his critical attitude to the Modern condition; using computational techniques of geometric modeling, visualization, graphics, digital manufacturing and structural analysis to explore and determine the formal rules and materials used by the artist to develop actions with significant spatial and social connotations.
keywords Anarchitecture; Modeling; Visualization; Digital Manufacturing; Structural Analysis
series SIGRADI
email hbarria@ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ga0217
id ga0217
authors Bentley, Katie A.
year 2002
title Exploring Aesthetic Pattern Formation
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This paper is an exploration of an interdisciplinary nature. Through studies in fine art, pattern formation in nature, and artificial life, a mechanism for the artistic process is presented. Asynchronous updating schemes implemented in cellular automata and pheromonal agent swarms were evolved to produce aesthetic patterns and compared favourably to non-evolved synchronous production methods. The curious adaptive properties of the resulting patterns were investigated.
series other
email k.bentley@cs.ucl.ac.uk
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 4805
authors Bentley, P.
year 1999
title Evolutionary Design by Computers Morgan Kaufmann
source San Francisco, CA
summary Computers can only do what we tell them to do. They are our blind, unconscious digital slaves, bound to us by the unbreakable chains of our programs. These programs instruct computers what to do, when to do it, and how it should be done. But what happens when we loosen these chains? What happens when we tell a computer to use a process that we do not fully understand, in order to achieve something we do not fully understand? What happens when we tell a computer to evolve designs? As this book will show, what happens is that the computer gains almost human-like qualities of autonomy, innovative flair, and even creativity. These 'skills'which evolution so mysteriously endows upon our computers open up a whole new way of using computers in design. Today our former 'glorified typewriters' or 'overcomplicated drawing boards' can do everything from generating new ideas and concepts in design, to improving the performance of designs well beyond the abilities of even the most skilled human designer. Evolving designs on computers now enables us to employ computers in every stage of the design process. This is no longer computer aided design - this is becoming computer design. The pages of this book testify to the ability of today's evolutionary computer techniques in design. Flick through them and you will see designs of satellite booms, load cells, flywheels, computer networks, artistic images, sculptures, virtual creatures, house and hospital architectural plans, bridges, cranes, analogue circuits and even coffee tables. Out of all of the designs in the world, the collection you see in this book have a unique history: they were all evolved by computer, not designed by humans.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 2006_000
id 2006_000
authors Bourdakis, Vassilis and Charitos, Dimitris (eds.)
year 2006
title Communicating Space(s)
source 24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings [ISBN 0-9541183-5-9], Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, 914 p.
summary The theme of this conference builds on and investigates the pre-existing and endlessly unfolding relationship between two domains of scientific inquiry: Architecture, urban design and planning, environmental design, geography and Social theory, media and communication studies, political science, cultural studies and social anthropology. Architectural design involves communication and could thus be partly considered a communicational activity. Designers (or not) see architectural designs, implicitly, as carriers of information and symbolic content; similarly buildings and urban environments have been “read” and interpreted by many (usu- ally not architects) as cultural texts. At the same time, social and cultural studies have studied buildings and cities, as contexts for social and cultural activities and life in general, from their mundane expression of “everyday life” (Highmore, 2001) to elite expressions of artistic creativity and performance. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) support both of these levels of scientific inquiry in many ways. Most importantly however, ICTs need design studies, architectural and visual design, social and cultural studies in their quest to create aesthetically pleasing, ergonomically efficient and functional ICT sys- tems; this need for interdisciplinarity is best articulated by the low quality of most on-line content and applica- tions published on the web.
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email vas@uth.gr
more http://www.ecaade.org
last changed 2006/08/16 16:55

_id f2f1
authors Breen, Jack and Nottrot, Robert
year 2000
title Project a2W. A Dialogue on New Media Perspectives
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 291-296
summary This paper documents an initiative taking the form of a "dialogue". The format which has been developed is somewhat similar to that of the "conversation" which Mondrian conceived in 1919, taking place between two fictitious characters - A and B - discussing the new direction in art, which he called "Nieuwe Beelding" and which contributed to the "De Stijl" movement (the dialogue was followed later that year by a "trialogue" between X, Y and Z on a virtual walk taking them from the countryside to the city) 1 . This time the issue is not so much the evolvement of a new artistic or architectural style, but the role of "new media" in architecture... The present dialogue takes place between two fictitious media proponents ("Alpha" and "Omega"). They take turns questioning several issues and exchanging proposals... What are the values - and the promises - of computer supported instruments in creative design and research - concerning the art and science shaping the built environment? How do the present applications measure up, how do they compare to the expectations and ambitions expressed a number of years ago? The form of a dialogue means that issues and ideas, which are not often aired within the confines of academic discourse, can be played back and forth and a measure of exaggeration was intended from the beginning... This contribution does not in any way pretend to be all-inclusive. Rather, the paper is meant to put forward ideas and experiences - from the perspective of the Delft Media group, in practice, in teaching and in research - which may stimulate (or even irritate?) but will hopefully activate. The aim is to open up discussions, to allow other (hidden) agendas for the future to become more visible and to look for platforms for sharing concepts and fascinations, however improbable they might be...
keywords A Dialogue on New Media
series eCAADe
email j.l.h.breen@bk.tudelft.nl, r.nottrot@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

For more results click below:

this is page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5... show page 9HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_832774 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002