CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id _id
id id
authors authors
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title title
source source
wos WOS
summary summary
keywords keywords
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last changed 1970/01/01 00:00

_id ee30
id ee30
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; El-Khouly, Tamer
year 2009
title Representing Reflective Practice in a Remote Design Collaboration Process
source Digital proceedings of the 3rd Conference of International Association of Societies of Design Research (IASDR 2009), COEX, Seoul, Korea, pp. 1317 – 1326.
summary This paper addresses a new method to describe the remote collaborative design process from the perspective of reflective practice. We aim at understanding the mutual effect between internal and external structures in remote collaborative design. According to the cognitive coding scheme of Suwa et al., we encoded the process into a set of indices—new, continual and revisited—that describe each primitive design move. In a case study which involved the authors as design collaborators, we identified the degree of dependency among these moves and developed a 3D graphical representation to account for reflective practice between us as collaborators. In this representation, we re-interpreted our collaborative process through three main axes: axis of idea exchange as lateral component, axis of idea development as vertical component, and axis of dependency as depth component. We believe this representation can be used to re-interpret the collaboration process among geographically dispersed design team members.
keywords Collaborative design, reflective practice, collective reflection-in-action, cognitive actions, design moves, dependency relationships, remote collaboration
series other
type normal paper
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2010/01/30 06:26

_id cf2011_p109
id cf2011_p109
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Lee Jinkook, Eastman Chuck
year 2011
title Automated Cost Analysis of Concept Design BIM Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 403-418.
summary AUTOMATED COST ANALYSIS OF CONCEPT DESIGN BIM MODELS Interoperability: BIM models and cost models This paper introduces the automated cost analysis developed for the General Services Administration (GSA) and the analysis results of a case study involving a concept design courthouse BIM model. The purpose of this study is to investigate interoperability issues related to integrating design and analysis tools; specifically BIM models and cost models. Previous efforts to generate cost estimates from BIM models have focused on developing two necessary but disjoint processes: 1) extracting accurate quantity take off data from BIM models, and 2) manipulating cost analysis results to provide informative feedback. Some recent efforts involve developing detailed definitions, enhanced IFC-based formats and in-house standards for assemblies that encompass building models (e.g. US Corps of Engineers). Some commercial applications enhance the level of detail associated to BIM objects with assembly descriptions to produce lightweight BIM models that can be used by different applications for various purposes (e.g. Autodesk for design review, Navisworks for scheduling, Innovaya for visual estimating, etc.). This study suggests the integration of design and analysis tools by means of managing all building data in one shared repository accessible to multiple domains in the AEC industry (Eastman, 1999; Eastman et al., 2008; authors, 2010). Our approach aims at providing an integrated platform that incorporates a quantity take off extraction method from IFC models, a cost analysis model, and a comprehensive cost reporting scheme, using the Solibri Model Checker (SMC) development environment. Approach As part of the effort to improve the performance of federal buildings, GSA evaluates concept design alternatives based on their compliance with specific requirements, including cost analysis. Two basic challenges emerge in the process of automating cost analysis for BIM models: 1) At this early concept design stage, only minimal information is available to produce a reliable analysis, such as space names and areas, and building gross area, 2) design alternatives share a lot of programmatic requirements such as location, functional spaces and other data. It is thus crucial to integrate other factors that contribute to substantial cost differences such as perimeter, and exterior wall and roof areas. These are extracted from BIM models using IFC data and input through XML into the Parametric Cost Engineering System (PACES, 2010) software to generate cost analysis reports. PACES uses this limited dataset at a conceptual stage and RSMeans (2010) data to infer cost assemblies at different levels of detail. Functionalities Cost model import module The cost model import module has three main functionalities: generating the input dataset necessary for the cost model, performing a semantic mapping between building type specific names and name aggregation structures in PACES known as functional space areas (FSAs), and managing cost data external to the BIM model, such as location and construction duration. The module computes building data such as footprint, gross area, perimeter, external wall and roof area and building space areas. This data is generated through SMC in the form of an XML file and imported into PACES. Reporting module The reporting module uses the cost report generated by PACES to develop a comprehensive report in the form of an excel spreadsheet. This report consists of a systems-elemental estimate that shows the main systems of the building in terms of UniFormat categories, escalation, markups, overhead and conditions, a UniFormat Level III report, and a cost breakdown that provides a summary of material, equipment, labor and total costs. Building parameters are integrated in the report to provide insight on the variations among design alternatives.
keywords building information modeling, interoperability, cost analysis, IFC
series CAAD Futures
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ce52
authors Abram, Greg, Weslover, Lee and Whitted, Turner
year 1985
title Efficient Alias-Free Rendering using Bit-masks and Look-up Tables
source SIGGRAPH '85 Conference Proceedings. July, 1985. vol. 19 ; no. 3: pp. 53-59 : ill. (some col.). includes bibliography
summary The authors demonstrate methods of rendering alias-free synthetic images using a precomputed convolution integral. The method is based on the observation that a visible polygon fragment's contribution to an image is solely a function of its position and shape, and that within a reasonable level of accuracy, a limited number of shapes represent the majority of cases encountered in images commonly rendered. The basic technique has been applied to several different rendering algorithms. A version of the newly non-uniform sampling technique implemented in the same program but with different tables values was introduced
keywords algorithms, computer graphics, anti-aliasing
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id avocaad_2001_14
id avocaad_2001_14
authors Adam Jakimowicz
year 2001
title Non-Linear Postrationalisation: Architectural Values Emergence in a Teamwork Interpretation
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The paper presents the outcomes of the experiment being conducted at the Faculty of Architecture in Bialystok, which derives form three main sources: a new course of architectural composition by computer modelling, developed and conducted in Bialystok postrationalisation as a formulation platform for new architectural values and theories, applied by e.g. Bernard Tschumi the idea of new values emergence resulting form a teamwork, when placed in an appropriate environment; It is assumed that the work performed first intuitively, can be later seriously interpreted, and to some extent rationalised, verbalised, described. With no doubt we can state, that in creative parts of architectural activities, very often decision are taken intuitively (form design). So this ‘procedure’ of postrationalisation of intuitively undertaken efforts and results seems to be very important –when trying to explain ideas. This kind of activity is also very important during the first years of architectural education. In case of this experiment, the students’ works from the course of architectural composition are taken as a base and subjects for interpretation, and values research. However, when at first, individual works are being interpreted by their authors, at the latter stage, the teams are to be formed. The aim of the teamwork is to present individual works, analyse them, find common value(s), and represent it (them) in an appropriate, creative way. The ideal environment to perform this work is hypertext based internet, because the non-linearity of team interpretations is unavoidable. On the other hand, the digital input data (computer models) is a very appropriate initial material to be used for hypermedia development. The experiment is to analyse the specific of the following: the self-influence of the group on the individual work ‘qualification’, mutual influence of the team members on their own work interpretation, the influence of the digital non-linear environment on the final outcome definition. The added value of hypertext in architectural groupwork digital performance shall be examined and described. A new value of individualised, though group based, non-linearity of expression will be presented and concluded.
series AVOCAAD
email jakima@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ecaade2012_212
id ecaade2012_212
authors Aghaei Meibodi, Mania ; Aghaiemeybodi, Hamia
year 2012
title The Synergy Between Structure and Ornament: A Reflection on the Practice of Tectonic in the Digital and Physical Worlds
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 245-254
wos WOS:000330320600024
summary The use of digital design and fabrication technologies in architecture has followed a paradigm shift, which has seen the topology, form and structure of architecture pushed to incorporate areas such as climate, construction, acoustic etc. While these digital technologies are intended to enhance the processes and performance, a discussion of aesthetics has been ignored. Surmising that the use of digital technology enhances the performability and effi ciency aspects of architecture as well as the aesthetics, this research questions what the new relationships and arrangements for structure and ornament are. What are the challenges when structure uses a process-based logic and is sensitive to materiality whereas the aesthetics has a representation-based logic and is not sensitive to materiality? The authors of this paper contribute to this debate by using the notion of tectonic as a platform for gaining and creating knowledge about this issue and examining the issues through the design and prototyping of a Multi-functional Pavilion.
keywords Processes; ornament; digital technology; tectonic; architectural expression
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email mania.meibodi@ltu.se
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id acadia12_47
id acadia12_47
authors Aish, Robert ; Fisher, Al ; Joyce, Sam ; Marsh, Andrew
year 2012
title Progress Towards Multi-Criteria Design Optimisation Using Designscript With Smart Form, Robot Structural Analysis and Ecotect Building Performance Analysis"
source ACADIA 12: Synthetic Digital Ecologies [Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-62407-267-3] San Francisco 18-21 October, 2012), pp. 47-56
summary Important progress towards the development of a system that enables multi-criteria design optimisation has recently been demonstrated during a research collaboration between Autodesk’s DesignScript development team, the University of Bath and the engineering consultancy Buro Happold. This involved integrating aspects of the Robot Structural Analysis application, aspects of the Ecotect building performance application and a specialist form finding solver called SMART Form (developed by Buro Happold) with DesignScript to create a single computation environment. This environment is intended for the generation and evaluation of building designs against both structural and building performance criteria, with the aim of expediently supporting computational optimisation and decision making processes that integrate across multiple design and engineering disciplines. A framework was developed to enable the integration of modeling environments with analysis and process control, based on the authors’ case studies and experience of applied performance driven design in practice. This more generalised approach (implemented in DesignScript) enables different designers and engineers to selectively configure geometry definition, form finding, analysis and simulation tools in an open-ended system without enforcing any predefined workflows or anticipating specific design strategies and allows for a full range of optimisation and decision making processes to be explored. This system has been demonstrated to practitioners during the Design Modeling Symposium, Berlin in 2011 and feedback from this has suggested further development.
keywords Design Optimisation , Scripting , Form Finding , Structural Analysis , Building Performance
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email robert.aish@autodesk.com
last changed 2013/01/09 10:06

_id eb23
authors Akin, Omer
year 1981
title Efficient Computer-User Interface in Electronic Mail Systems
source Department of Computer Science, April, 1981. ii, 24 p. includes bibliography
summary This research explores the question of improving user- computer interface. The approach is one of observing and codifying various parameters that influence the efficiency of interface in the context of electronic mail tasks. In the paper the authors observe 'expert' and 'regular' users of a mail system and analyze the sources of efficiency. It is clear that experts use a different, more specialized, set of commands in performing standard mail tasks. While experts perform these tasks with fewer errors and more 'completely,' it is not clear that they achieve this any faster than regular users. Recommendations for design are made
keywords user interface, protocol analysis
series CADline
email oa04@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/05/17 08:09

_id acadia17_62
id acadia17_62
authors Al-Assaf, Nancy S.; Clayton, Mark J.
year 2017
title Representing the Aesthetics of Richard Meier’s Houses Using Building Information Modeling
source ACADIA 2017: DISCIPLINES & DISRUPTION [Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-96506-1] Cambridge, MA 2-4 November, 2017), pp. 62-71
summary Beyond its widespread use for representing technical aspects and matters of building and construction science, Building information modeling (BIM) can be used to represent architectural relationships and rules drawn from aesthetic theory. This research suggests that BIM provides not only vocabulary but also syntactical tools that can be used to capture an architectural language. In a case study using Richard Meier’s language for single-family detached houses, a BIM template has been devised to represent the aesthetic concepts and relations therein. The template employs parameterized conceptual mass objects, syntactical rules, and a library of architectonic elements, such as walls, roofs, columns, windows, doors, and railings. It constrains any design produced using the template to a grammatically consistent expression or style. The template has been used as the starting point for modeling the Smith House, the Douglas House, and others created by the authors, demonstrating that the aesthetic template is general to many variations. Designing with the template to produce a unique but conforming design further illustrates the generality and expressiveness of the language. Having made the formal language explicit, in terms of syntactical rules and vocabulary, it becomes easier to vary the formal grammar and concrete vocabulary to produce variant languages and styles. Accordingly, this approach is not limited to a specific style, such as Richard Meier's. Future research can be conducted to demonstrate how designing with BIM can support stylistic change. Adoption of this approach in practice could improve the consistency of architectural designs and their coherence to defined styles, potentially increasing the general level of aesthetic expression in our built environment.
keywords design methods; information processing; BIM; education
series ACADIA
email nancy.alassaf@tamu.edu
last changed 2017/10/17 09:12

_id eb5f
authors Al-Sallal, Khaled A. and Degelman, Larry 0.
year 1994
title A Hypermedia Model for Supporting Energy Design in Buildings
source Reconnecting [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-03-9] Washington University (Saint Louis / USA) 1994, pp. 39-49
summary Several studies have discussed the limitations of the available CAAD tools and have proposed solutions [Brown and Novitski 1987, Brown 1990, Degelman and Kim 1988, Schuman et al 1988]. The lack of integration between the different tasks that these programs address and the design process is a major problem. Schuman et al [1988] argued that in architectural design many issues must be considered simultaneously before the synthesis of a final product can take place. Studies by Brown and Novitski [1987] and Brown [1990] discussed the difficulties involved with integrating technical considerations in the creative architectural process. One aspect of the problem is the neglect of technical factors during the initial phase of the design that, as the authors argued, results from changing the work environment and the laborious nature of the design process. Many of the current programs require the user to input a great deal of numerical values that are needed for the energy analysis. Although there are some programs that attempt to assist the user by setting default values, these programs distract the user with their extensive arrays of data. The appropriate design tool is the one that helps the user to easily view the principal components of the building design and specify their behaviors and interactions. Data abstraction and information parsimony are the key concepts in developing a successful design tool. Three different approaches for developing an appropriate CAAD tool were found in the literature. Although there are several similarities among them, each is unique in solving certain aspects of the problem. Brown and Novitski [1987] emphasize the learning factor of the tool as well as its highly graphical user interface. Degelman and Kim [1988] emphasize knowledge acquisition and the provision of simulation modules. The Windows and Daylighting Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) emphasizes the dynamic structuring of information, the intelligent linking of data, the integrity of the different issues of design and the design process, and the extensive use of images [Schuman et al 19881, these attributes incidentally define the word hypermedia. The LBL model, which uses hypermedia, seems to be the more promising direction for this type of research. However, there is still a need to establish a new model that integrates all aspects of the problem. The areas in which the present research departs from the LBL model can be listed as follows: it acknowledges the necessity of regarding the user as the center of the CAAD tool design, it develops a model that is based on one of the high level theories of human-computer interaction, and it develops a prototype tool that conforms to the model.

series ACADIA
email l-degelman@neo.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ecaade2017_240
id ecaade2017_240
authors Al-Sudani, Amer, Hussein, Hussein and Sharples, Steve
year 2017
title Sky View Factor Calculation - A computational-geometrical approach
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 673-682
summary Sky view factor (SVF) is a well-known parameter in urban-climatic studies, but there is a lack of consensus on its effectiveness, especially with regard to the interpretation of changes in urban air temperatures. This led the authors to develop the new concept of the partial sky view factor (SVFp), which showed promise in a previous study. The objective of this study is to save the time associated with manual methods of calculating SVF and SVFp by developing a Rhino-Grasshopper component to quantify them via the hemispheric projection of a 3D model. In addition, a different approach, in terms of a hemispheric projection to calculate SVF, will be introduced by another component, and the pros and cons of each approach are considered. We will name these methods 'Ray Method' and 'Geometrical Method' respectively. The Ray Method has achieved a good balance between accuracy, processing time and urban scale and complexity compared to the Geometrical Method.
keywords Sky view factor; parametric design; Rhino - Grasshopper; urban morphology; partial Sky view factor
series eCAADe
email A.H.A.Al-Sudani@liverpool.ac.uk
last changed 2017/09/13 13:30

_id ecaade2017_184
id ecaade2017_184
authors Almeida, Daniel and Sousa, José Pedro
year 2017
title Tradition and Innovation in Digital Architecture - Reviewing the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2005
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 267-276
summary Please write your aToday, in a moment when digital technologies are taking command of many architectural design and construction processes, it is important to examine the place and role of traditional ones. Designed by Álvaro Siza and Eduardo Souto de Moura in collaboration with Cecil Balmond, the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2005 reflects the potential of combining those two different approaches in the production of innovative buildings. For inquiring this argument, this paper investigates the development of this project from its conception to construction with a double goal: to uncover the relationship between analogical and digital processes, and to understand the architects' role in a geographically distributed workflow, which involved the use of computational design and robotic fabrication technologies. To support this examination, the authors designed and fabricated a 1:3 scale prototype of part of the Pavilion, which also served to check and reflect on the technological evolution since then, which is setting different conditions for design development and collaboration.bstract here by clicking this paragraph.
keywords Serpentine Gallery Pavilion; Computational Design; Digital Fabrication; Wooden Construction; Architectural Representation;
series eCAADe
email jsousa@arq.up.pt
last changed 2017/09/13 13:13

_id sigradi2016_803
id sigradi2016_803
authors Almeida, Marcela Alves de
year 2016
title A teoria da ludificação e os ambientes responsivos [The theory of ludification and responsive environments]
source SIGraDi 2016 [Proceedings of the 20th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-956-7051-86-1] Argentina, Buenos Aires 9 - 11 November 2016, pp.838-843
summary This paper reports the responsive environments and the Theory of Ludification towards the interaction design using the structure of games on feedback process. It presents an interaction classification that can be reactive, responsive and dialogical based on authors related to cybernetics studies. It exposes the need for rationality in environments as an intrinsic and necessary condition for achieving the interaction. It also uses dialogue and game Vilém Flusser’s concepts to support this argument. Thus, it broadens the contemporary architectural discussion that encompassing communication processes that do not recognize the physical boundaries of the buildings.
keywords Resposive Environment; Ludification; Interaction; Play; Game
series other
type normal paper
email marcela@ufsj.edu.br
last changed 2017/06/21 12:51

_id 456a
authors Alvarado, R.G., Parra, J.C., Vergara, R.L. and Chateau, H.B.
year 2000
title Architectural References to Virtual Environments Design
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 151-155
summary Based on a comparison between the perception of digital and real construction, the development of virtual systems and the review of additional sources, this paper states some differences between the design of virtual environments and architectural spaces. Virtual-reality technologies provide advanced capabilities to simulate real situations, and also to create digital worlds not referred to physical places, such as imaginary landscapes or environments devoted to electronic activities, like entertainment, learning or commerce. Some on-line services already use 3D-stages, resembling building halls and domestic objects, and several authors have mentioned virtual modeling as a job opportunity to architects. But it will argue in this paper that the design of those environments should consider their own digital characteristics. Besides, the use of virtual installations on networks impells a convergence with global media, like Internet or TV. Virtual environments can be a 3Devolution of communicational technologies, which have an increasing participation in culture, reaching a closer relationship to contemporary architecture.
keywords Virtual Environments, Spatial Perception, Design Methodology
series eCAADe
email rgarcia@ubiobio.cl
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id caadria2015_202
id caadria2015_202
authors Amtsberg, Felix; Felix Raspall and Andreas Trummer
year 2015
title Digital-Material Feedback in Architectural Design
source Emerging Experience in Past, Present and Future of Digital Architecture, Proceedings of the 20th International Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2015) / Daegu 20-22 May 2015, pp. 631-640
summary This paper studies the architectural potential of the implementation of material feedback using computer vision before and during an automated fabrication process. The combination of an industrial robot and a 3D camera is used expand the typical one-way design and fabrication process (from a digital design to a physical output), to a feedback loop, where specific material information becomes the main trigger of design decisions and fabrication processes. Several projects developed by the authors and tested during a robotic workshop aim to unveil different aspects of material feedback in architectural design, opening a discussion for the benefit and challenges of this new approach to design and fabrication.
keywords Material feedback; robotic fabrication; computer vision; digital workflow; robotic workshop;
series CAADRIA
email felix.amtsberg@tugraz.at
last changed 2015/06/05 05:14

_id acadia03_002
id acadia03_002
authors Anders, Peter
year 2003
title Four Degrees Of Freedom
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, p. 17
summary Letting go is hard to do. Remember back to when, after months of trying, you let go of the handlebars of your bicycle and sailed down the street, effortless and assured. It was a freedom born of mastery, balance and technique. You had let go, but were in control. Technique extends to other devices as well and we are here to discuss architectural computation. Here too, as we will see, mastery is shown by letting go. These papers explore new degrees of freedom in design computation. Each is on a separate aspect of architecture, whether it be aesthetics, process, or structure. Two papers inquire into the entities of design and the processes by which they are manifested. They pose important questions. If we can affect the course of design going forward, are we free to change its past? By defining the characteristics of objects at the outset, are we through automation free to choose from a refined spectrum of outcomes? From the evidence of these papers, the answer to both questions is yes. Through the agency of parametric design we can affect the future and past of architectural processes and their products. Rather than being locked into rigid, linear decisions we are temporally free to choose, tweak and modify. Choice and chance play an important role in aesthetics as well. This has become emblematic of design trends as we have seen in recent years. One of our papers addresses the indeterminacy of particle systems in the design of a monument to the victims of 9/11. By letting go of the handlebars of the computer, the author has been freed to new, poetic forms and processes. Another paper opens urban design to its client community by use of a sophisticated web site. In the tradition of populist innovators like Charles Moore and Lucien Kroll, the authors have extended the design process beyond the office walls to the city itself. The designers, by loosening their grip on the project have made the effort democratic and participatory. Intriguingly, at the end of the paper, they note that this use of cyberspace opens the door to a non-physical architecture. Could architecture, then, let go its materialist biases as well? We hope to engage this and other questions shortly.We are pleased then, to share with you these insights and projects. Wassim and I hope that these presentations will be as liberating for you as they were for us.
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/11/27 14:21

_id 9d10
authors Anders, Peter and Livingstone, Daniel
year 2001
title STARS: Shared Transatlantic Augmented Reality System
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 350-355
summary Since October 2000 the authors have operated a laboratory, the Shared Transatlantic Augmented Reality System (STARS), for exploring telepresence in the domestic environment. The authors, an artist and an architect, are conducting a series of experiments to test their hypotheses concerning mixed reality and supportive environments. This paper describes these hypotheses, the purpose and construction of the lab, and preliminary results from the ongoing collaboration.
keywords Mixed Reality, Cybrid, Art, Cyberspace, CAiiA-STAR
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id caadria2005_b_5b_d
id caadria2005_b_5b_d
authors Andre Brown, Michael Knight, Martin Winchester
year 2005
title Representation and Delivery of City Models
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 344-352
summary City modelling has a considerable range of potential applications and because of this, as a field of research has attracted a great deal of attention over recent years. Here we reflect on work already reported by the authors in this area, describe some more recent work on improving the system that had been developed and show an example of how city modelling is being applied in practice as a planning tool in the UK.
series CAADRIA
email andygpb@liv.ac.uk
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id sigradi2012_30
id sigradi2012_30
authors Angeluzzi, Gustavo; Hanns, Daniela Kutschat
year 2012
title Um levantamento de requisitos gerais para o desenvolvimento e posicionamento de DOOTERS – um aplicativo lúdico de listas de tarefas para iPhone [A survey of general requirements for developing and positioning DOOTERS - a to-do list application for iPhone]
source SIGraDi 2012 [Proceedings of the 16th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Brasil - Fortaleza 13-16 November 2012, pp. 191-195
summary DOOTERS is a to-do list application for iPhone which entertains and motivates the user to get things done. It was developed based on requirements obtained trough: 1. the study of several personal information organizing methods (Covey, 1989; Allen, 2005; Foster, 2006); 2. answers to a task lists user focused questionnaire; 3. observation of to-do list users while creating lists and organizing tasks; 4. comparison of digital and non-digital task list media (paper, computer and mobile device); 5. analysis of profiles, behaviors and to-do list applications for iPhone. In this paper, the authors present the process of obtaining requirements for developing and positioning DOOTERS.
keywords information and interface design, requirements, to-do list application, iPhone, DOOTERS
series SIGRADI
email dk.hanns@uol.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2005_000
id sigradi2005_000
authors Angulo, Antonieta and Vásquez de Velasco, Guillermo (eds.)
year 2005
title SiGradi2005: Vision and Visualization
source Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics Graphics / ISBN 978-1-59975-306-5] Lima (Perú) 21-23 november 2005, 826 p.
summary Paradoxically, one of the most difficult but enjoyable things we do is to imagine. To open the eyes of our mind and see what no one else can see. We see images of things that are yet to be and through the same skill we devise ways in which to make them happen. We design the future in the form of environments, graphics, products, films, and a growing range of new media. Our ability to develop a vision and to visualize it is a gift that we are called to cultivate and put to good use. We have been privileged with a great responsibility. In the process of developing a vision and communicating that vision to others, we “visualize”. Visualization can be a very private experience in which we are alone with mental images that help us shape our vision. In other instances visualization can be a component of mass communication. Visualization can be a means or can be an end. It can be a small architectural sketch on a paper napkin or a mega-graphic covering a high-rise building, an airplane or a ship. In every case, the relationship between vision and visualization is a mutually supportive articulation of what our eyes and our minds can see. Our vision of the role of computers in the art and science of visualization is in constant development. Computer visualization can support an intimate dialog between a designer and his/her vision. It can translate and communicate that vision to a larger audience and in the hands of a new-media artist it can actually constitute his/her vision. The 9th Annual Conference of SIGraDI (Ibero American Society for Computer Graphics) will explore our collective vision on the future of digital visualization and digital media in Environmental Design, Product Design, Graphic Design, Cinematography, New Media, and Art. Authors are invited to share their research work with a focus on how it contributes to shape a collective understanding of the past, awareness of the present, and vision of the future in our multiple disciplines.
series SIGRADI
email vasquez@archone.tamu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

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