CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id a977
authors Rivera , Antonieta and Wojtowicz, Jerzy
year 1997
title Aspects of Tenochtitlan: Nature of CD-ROM Production in the Construction of Content
source Design and Representation [ACADIA ‘97 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-06-3] Cincinatti, Ohio (USA) 3-5 October 1997, pp. 319-327
summary At the beginning of the sixteenth century, the Aztec capital, Tenochtitlan, was one of the world's largest cities. By 1521, the Spaniards under Hernan Cortes had destroyed both the Empire and the city. Tenochtitlan was razed to its foundations and Mexico City was built on top of it (Matos, 1993).

This paper discusses the process for developing digital interpretations of the Teocalli or Ceremonial Precinct of Tenochtitlan based on historical, iconographical, and archaeological materials. To this end, digital models were constructed by taking into consideration Aztec archaeoastronomical principles and measuring systems. The result is an interactive view of the Ceremonial Precinct, perhaps the most comprehensive since Tenochtitlan was destroyed more than 500 years ago. This project has been recently published on CD-ROM.

series ACADIA
email arivera@architecture.ubc.ca, jw@architecture.ubc.ca
last changed 1998/12/31 12:35

_id 9ea4
authors Serrato-Combe, Antonio
year 2001
title From Aztec Pictograms to Digital Media - The Case of the Aztec Temple Square
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 034-043
summary Virtual archaeology or re-creating ancient worlds digitally is not a new item. While the virtual reconstructions of Cahokia on the Mississippi or the Royal Cemetery at Ur in Iraq have provided us with glimpses of how those ancient sites might have looked, the ‘quality’ of the digital end product has been lacking. This is because virtual archaeology is in its infant stages. This paper makes the point that in order to truly develop the bases of a new cognitive science, virtual archaeology has to incorporate a willingness to achieve higher digital modeling and rendering qualities. In other words, our ability to explore, to interpret and to appropriately use digital tools needs to aspire to greater and more penetrating abilities to reconstruct the past. This paper presents the case of the digital reconstruction of the Aztec Temple Square. This is a unique project because, unlike other sites in antiquity where there is a substantial amount of archaeological evidence, the Aztec site contains little or almost no evidence. Most of what we know of the case comes from Indian manuscripts and Spanish chronicles.
keywords Virtual Archaeology, Reconstruction, History
series ACADIA
email serrato@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id b507
authors Serrato-Combe, Antonio
year 2002
title Visualizando el Pasado. El Caso del Templo Mayor de México [Visualizing the Past. Case of the Great Temple of Mexico]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 55-62
summary Like Ernesto Cardenal, Planet Earth is almost to the point of drinking, smoking, buying and eating the same identical items. Sadly, culture is not on the menu. This is poignantly true when the term culture relates to the appreciation of how countries and cultures came to be. Even history classes taught in elementary schools worldwide have chosen to dedicate more time and energies to the study of the immediate present rather than presenting to young minds the formidable cultural wealth thatwe inherited from our ancestors. This paper documents research in the field of virtual reconstructions of the past. It makes the point that in order to truly develop the bases of a solid appreciation of cultural patrimonies, virtual reconstructions of the past have to incorporate a willingness to achieve higher digital modeling and rendering qualities. And, they have to be well integrated into history courses at all education levels and through a variety of means of communication. In other words, our ability to explore, to interpret and to appropriately use digital tools needs to aspire to greater and more penetrating abilities to reconstruct the past.As a case study, the paper presents the theoretical reconstruction of the Aztec Templo Mayor in Mexico (1). The presentation includes animated sections, visualizations and animations, and how a variety of digital approaches was used to grasp and appreciate the very significant architectural contributions of the early inhabitants of the Americas.
series SIGRADI
email serrato@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 09:00

_id ijac20031302
id ijac20031302
authors Serrato-Combe, Antonio
year 2003
title The Aztec Templo Mayor - A Visualization
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 3
summary This article documents research in the field of virtual reconstructions of the past. It makes the point that in order to truly develop the bases of a solid appreciation of cultural patrimonies, historic virtual reconstructions need to incorporate a willingness to achieve higher digital modeling and rendering qualities. And, they should also be well integrated into history courses at all education levels and through a variety of means of communication. In other words, our ability to explore, to interpret and to appropriately use digital tools needs to aspire to greater and more penetrating abilities to reconstruct the past. As a case study, the paper presents the theoretical reconstruction of the Aztec Templo Mayor in Mexico (1). The presentation describes how a variety of digital approaches was used to grasp and appreciate the very significant architectural contributions of the early inhabitants of the Americas.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

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