CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id ddss2004_ra-177
id ddss2004_ra-177
authors Ballas, D., R. Kingston, and J. Stillwell
year 2004
title Using a Spatial Microsimulation Decision Support System for Policy Scenario Analysis
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) Recent Advances in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, ISBN: 1-4020-2408-8, p. 177-191
summary This paper discusses the potential of a spatial microsimulation-based decision support system for policy analysis. The system can be used to describe current conditions and issues in neighbourhoods, predict future trends in the composition and health of neighbourhoods and conduct modelling and predictive analysis to measure the likely impact of policy interventions at the local level. A large dynamic spatial micro-simulation model is being constructed for the population of Leeds (approximately 715,000 individuals) based on spatial microsimulation techniques in conjunction with a range of data, including 2001 Census data for Output Areas and sample data from the British Household Panel Survey. The project has three main aims as follows: (i) to develop a static microsimulation model to describe current conditions in Leeds; (ii) to enable the performance of ‘What if?’ analysis on a range of policy scenarios; and (iii) to develop a dynamic microsimulation model to predict future conditions in Leeds under different policy scenarios. The paper reports progress in meeting the above aims and outlines the associated difficulties and data issues. One of the significant advantages of the spatial microsimulation approach adopted by this project is that it enables the user to query any combination of variables that is deemed desirable for policy analysis. The paper will illustrate the software tool being developed in the context of this project that is capable of carrying out queries of this type and of mapping their results. The decision support tool is being developed to support policy-makers concerned with urban regeneration and neighbourhood renewal.
keywords Spatial Microsimulation, Spatial Decision Support Systems, Geotools
series DDSS
last changed 2004/07/03 20:13

_id a1cc
authors Bridges, Alan H.
year 1997
title Building Systems Integration and the Implications for CAD Education
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary The author has been a member of two important U.K. reviews of construction computing (references [1] and [2]). The paper draws on these reports, other U.K. Government Reports and theoretical work on collaborative design undertaken at the University of Strathclyde to present an evaluation of Information Technology use in practice and its implications for education.
keywords Use of computers in British architectural practice, The implications of information technology on the structure and working methods of the UK building industry, Implications for CAD education
series eCAADe
email a.h.bridges@strath.ac.uk
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/bridges/bridges.htm
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ddssar9606
id ddssar9606
authors Doughty, D.C. and Zwirner, W.G.
year 1996
title Spa Hotels and Facilities - a Comparison of Hotels in Budapest, Buxton and Piestany
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary In Britain, health and leisure tourism seems primarily to mean leisure with health being normally merely a secondary consideration ranging from fresh air to diet. In central Europe Spas still draw tourists and patients for leisure and for treatments from their own as well as neighbouring countries. Indeed, whilst Buxton, Bath, Harrogate and Leamington draw day trippers to see their historic buildings, Carlsbad, Budapest, Piestany and many of the other grand old Spas of central Europe are filled with longer-term guests seeking an improvement to their own chronic ailments. The reasons for this decline in British Spas and the continuing relative good health of Spas in central Europe are a complex mix that includes national characteristic, financial constraints and a disbelief by the British medical establishment in the efficacy of the water cure and related Spa treatments. This reluctance to acknowledge complementary health care is certainly not the case in Germany and the old Austro-Hungarian lands and Spa tourism presents a challenge as well as a promise of lucrative international tourism to the emerging "new" states of pre-communist Europe.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id maver_104
id maver_104
authors Ennis, Gareth and Maver, Tom
year 1999
title Inside the Map - The Glasgow Directory
source Proceedings of 36th Annual Symposium of the British Cartographic Society, Glasgow (UK)
summary The characteristics of the traditional map have remained unchanged for centuries A symbolic representation of reality, the map relies on the user's understanding of scale, orientation, reference and location.
series other
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/03 13:36

_id maver_096
id maver_096
authors Ennis, Gareth and Maver, Tom
year 1999
title Inside the Map - The Glasgow Directory
source Proceedings of 36th Annual Symposium of the British Cartographic Society, Glasgow (UK)
summary The characteristics of the traditional map have remained unchanged for centuries A symbolic representation of reality, the map relies on the user's understanding of scale, orientation, reference and location.
series other
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/03 13:01

_id b36d
authors Lewis, Martin Lewis and Wojtowicz, Jerzy
year 2001
title Design in the New Media - Digital Design Pedagogy at the SoA, University of British Columbia
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 256-261
summary The idea of the Bauhaus education was born out of the conviction that designs for mass production and modern architecture needed a new fundamental design strategy. Today, seventy-five years later, the modern, basic design pedagogy needs to be revisited, as the impact of the Information Technology Revolution on design practice and education is now extensive. The illustrations and reflections on a modern curriculum for fundamental design and communication presented in this paper are derived from the authors’ introduction of the new media to design studios at UBC and from design practice. In the case of the nascent student of architecture, a different, rudimentary approach is required: one calling for the combining of the modern, basic design agenda with the introduction of the new media. The fundamental digital design pedagogy is young and not fully established. This is a considerable problem, since the practice and learning of architecture today is increasingly aided by and dependent upon digital media. Parallel to the traditional methods, the contemporary student of design is now obliged to engage new and dynamic conditions at the formative stage of his or her education. In the recent past, the computer was considered as just another device, requiring the development of mechanical techniques or skills. While those skills still have to be mastered, more recently in design education and practice, IT has become accepted as MEDIA - not just as a drafting or modeling tool. This process is perhaps due to the rapid dissemination of computing literacy and to the progressive accessibility and ease of use of IT. At UBC, Techniques and the Foundation Studio are introductory courses intended to make students engage the new media in parallel with, and complimentary to, established conventions in design.
keywords Imagining, Communicating
series eCAADe
email jw@arch.ubc.ca
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id 8095
authors Mahrouq, Abdulrahman and Al-Haddad, Baha'uddin
year 2001
title Gaza City: Virtual space and the control of physical space
source CORP 2001, Vienna, pp. 397-402
summary The interaction between virtual space and physical space is increasingly gaining more importance and consideration [1]. Much of theinterest concentrates upon theorizing this interaction and investigating the different concepts behind it [2]. Another concern is toexplore aspects of the physical space through its virtuality especially in the field of architecture and urban design [3]. Yet with theevidence that the increasing pace of development in multimedia, information and communications technology is exerting vastchanges on the physical space, there is a disparate need for control over these very fast changes. Control of the physical space is themain subject of physical planning where it is crucial to develop new tools and procedures for better control of the urban change.Applications of data, information and communications technologies in urban planning and geographic information system (GIS)constitute one of the vital fields for the control and guidance of urban development.In Gaza Strip for example, unprecedented developments resulted after the declaration of the Palestinian- Israeli peace agreements in1994. Information and communications technologies and data sources were improved with the introduction of computers, moderntelephone and wireless communications and satellite imaging. The new developments began to impinge the existing British Mandatesystem and the physical planning process. The municipality of Gaza city took the lead and became the most important and activelocal planning institution to benefit from the new situation. Although the new developments are in their early stage, the positiveimpact on the planning process and the control over the built environment in the city are paramount.This paper aims at exploring the new developments of spatial technologies in the municipality of Gaza and their impact on theplanning conduct and the built environment in the city.
series other
more www.corp.at
last changed 2002/09/04 11:19

_id c7e9
authors Maver, T.W.
year 2002
title Predicting the Past, Remembering the Future
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 2-3
summary Charlas Magistrales 2There never has been such an exciting moment in time in the extraordinary 30 year history of our subject area, as NOW,when the philosophical theoretical and practical issues of virtuality are taking centre stage.The PastThere have, of course, been other defining moments during these exciting 30 years:• the first algorithms for generating building layouts (circa 1965).• the first use of Computer graphics for building appraisal (circa 1966).• the first integrated package for building performance appraisal (circa 1972).• the first computer generated perspective drawings (circa 1973).• the first robust drafting systems (circa 1975).• the first dynamic energy models (circa 1982).• the first photorealistic colour imaging (circa 1986).• the first animations (circa 1988)• the first multimedia systems (circa 1995), and• the first convincing demonstrations of virtual reality (circa 1996).Whereas the CAAD community has been hugely inventive in the development of ICT applications to building design, it hasbeen woefully remiss in its attempts to evaluate the contribution of those developments to the quality of the built environmentor to the efficiency of the design process. In the absence of any real evidence, one can only conjecture regarding the realbenefits which fall, it is suggested, under the following headings:• Verisimilitude: The extraordinary quality of still and animated images of the formal qualities of the interiors and exteriorsof individual buildings and of whole neighborhoods must surely give great comfort to practitioners and their clients thatwhat is intended, formally, is what will be delivered, i.e. WYSIWYG - what you see is what you get.• Sustainability: The power of «first-principle» models of the dynamic energetic behaviour of buildings in response tochanging diurnal and seasonal conditions has the potential to save millions of dollars and dramatically to reduce thedamaging environmental pollution created by badly designed and managed buildings.• Productivity: CAD is now a multi-billion dollar business which offers design decision support systems which operate,effectively, across continents, time-zones, professions and companies.• Communication: Multi-media technology - cheap to deliver but high in value - is changing the way in which we canexplain and understand the past and, envisage and anticipate the future; virtual past and virtual future!MacromyopiaThe late John Lansdown offered the view, in his wonderfully prophetic way, that ...”the future will be just like the past, onlymore so...”So what can we expect the extraordinary trajectory of our subject area to be?To have any chance of being accurate we have to have an understanding of the phenomenon of macromyopia: thephenomenon exhibitted by society of greatly exaggerating the immediate short-term impact of new technologies (particularlythe information technologies) but, more importantly, seriously underestimating their sustained long-term impacts - socially,economically and intellectually . Examples of flawed predictions regarding the the future application of information technologiesinclude:• The British Government in 1880 declined to support the idea of a national telephonic system, backed by the argumentthat there were sufficient small boys in the countryside to run with messages.• Alexander Bell was modest enough to say that: «I am not boasting or exaggerating but I believe, one day, there will bea telephone in every American city».• Tom Watson, in 1943 said: «I think there is a world market for about 5 computers».• In 1977, Ken Olssop of Digital said: «There is no reason for any individuals to have a computer in their home».The FutureJust as the ascent of woman/man-kind can be attributed to her/his capacity to discover amplifiers of the modest humancapability, so we shall discover how best to exploit our most important amplifier - that of the intellect. The more we know themore we can figure; the more we can figure the more we understand; the more we understand the more we can appraise;the more we can appraise the more we can decide; the more we can decide the more we can act; the more we can act themore we can shape; and the more we can shape, the better the chance that we can leave for future generations a trulysustainable built environment which is fit-for-purpose, cost-beneficial, environmentally friendly and culturally significactCentral to this aspiration will be our understanding of the relationship between real and virtual worlds and how to moveeffortlessly between them. We need to be able to design, from within the virtual world, environments which may be real ormay remain virtual or, perhaps, be part real and part virtual.What is certain is that the next 30 years will be every bit as exciting and challenging as the first 30 years.
series SIGRADI
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 0865
authors Mishima, Yoshitaka and Szalapaj, Peter John
year 2001
title Architectural Design Development through Multimedia Interaction
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 299-314
summary This paper describes the development of a multimedia system aimed at architects and architectural students for the purpose of helping them to understand the basic concepts of architectural analysis. Analytical features in the system that we have developed include many design-theoretic concepts such as massing, balance and circulation. Other concepts are more directly related to the built environment and include elements such as lighting, structure and construction. The system illustrates architectural analysis carried out on a range of building types dynamically, and allows users to navigate architectural analyses interactively. Users can learn about the differences between buildings and their corresponding analyses in a supportive non-linear learning process, and can explore building types depending upon their own interests or needs. The prototype system contains analyses of three British building projects. They show different types of architecture in order to demonstrate important design theoretic and environmental differences. Conceptual models in the system show important aspects of a particular analysis simply, and each analysis is additionally described with text, animations, video clips and interviews with architects (talking heads). Most of the models were generated by the use of architectural CAD software. Animation techniques were used to describe the analyses of buildings clearly and dynamically. Users can visualise how whole buildings were designed from an analytical point of view, and the system illustrates design thinking by showing dynamic presentations of analyses. Users can structure their own design learning processes through a series of interactions. These interactions are supported with flexible cross-referencing mechanisms implemented in Macromedia Director 8.0 exploiting Frame Markers, Event Handling, Navigation, and Buttons in the context of the object-oriented Lingo programming language. The navigation component of this system has a logical matrix structure reflecting the fact that analytical information is interrelated across building types, giving rise to vertical and horizontal patterns of access. The features of Director 8.0 can control this navigation in a flexible yet structured way. Users not only learn about analysis, but also how to present their own designs to the public through the use of different kinds of presentation techniques, particularly through the use of conceptual models. We intend that users can show their projects from their own analytical viewpoints instead of simply showing realistic images of final designs. Presentations can also be recorded in the system, and these can in turn be used as reference material for other users. This system is currently being developed further by storing presentations and translating them into different languages (e.g. Japanese) so that foreign users in other institutions can interact with these presentations. This system has been evaluated in the context of an undergraduate CAD course at the School of Architecture, University of Sheffield, UK. We are currently examining the usefulness of the system based upon an evaluation process, in addition to including more building types for future study.
keywords Analysis Of Form, Dynamic Interaction, Conceptual Models
series CAAD Futures
email arp95ym@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id sigradi2006_e151c
id sigradi2006_e151c
authors Neumann, Oliver and Schmidt, Daniel
year 2006
title CNC Timber Framing – Innovative Applications of Digital Wood Fabrication Technology
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 304-307
summary The discourse on depleting natural resources and compromised environments have led to extended research on sustainable designs methods, building practices and materials. Beyond the actual performance of building products and components, research on sustainable building increasingly focuses on the long-term effects of the production, application and life cycle of building materials on the natural environment, human inhabitation and quality of life. Computer aided manufacturing technologies play a significant role not only in the transformation of design and building methods, but also in an extended discourse on cultural development. Globally available technologies connect the design and building process to a broad range of long-term ecological factors by creating a correlation between "the emergent political, economical and social processes and … architectural techniques, geometries and organization." Through this interrelationship to economy and culture, technology and its applications are also directly related to notions of place and territory as well as to fundamental ideas of ecology. The collaborative research and design study for an outdoor theater roof structure at the University of British Columbia Malcolm Knapp Research Forest at Maple Ridge, B.C., Canada, focuses on the use of digital media in prefabrication and material optimization. By utilizing small square section timber and minimizing the use of alienating connectors the research on the wood roof structure illustrates the potential of a design culture that seeks innovation in a broader understanding of ecology routed in regional culture, environmental conditions, economy and tradition. Labor intensive manufacturing techniques are redefined aided by computer controlled machines and virtual modeling of complex geometries is translated into simple operations. The result is a more sensible and accurate response to the place’s demands. In order to generate innovative design interventions that make a constructive long-term contribution to the preservation, maintenance and evolution of the environment, design needs to be based on a comprehensive understanding of its context and the distinctive qualities of the materials used. Following the example of the outdoor roof structure, this paper aims to define innovative design as work that resonates at the intersection of the fields of technology, material science, manufacturing processes, techniques of assembly and context that constitute the expanded context or complex ecology that projects need to engage. It is in design research studies like for the outdoor theater roof structure with focus on CNC wood fabrication technologies that the common design and building discourse is put to question, boundaries are explored and expanded and the collective understanding is improved towards ecological design.
keywords CNC Wood Fabrication; Design Innovation; Ecology
series SIGRADI
email neumann@oliverneumann.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:56

_id sigradi2005_184
id sigradi2005_184
authors Neumann, Oliver
year 2005
title The Convergence of Local and Global Contexts - Innovative Applications of CNC Wood Fabrication Technologies
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 184-189
summary Contemporary building technologies have the potential to contribute to regional building practices. With a focus on the cultural context in British Columbia, Canada, this paper explores how CNC timber framing technology can influence the generation of a regional building culture in the Pacific Northwest. Student projects serve as examples of creative applications of CNC timber framing technology sensitive to the complex conditions of our surroundings.
series SIGRADI
email neumann@oliverneumann.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:56

_id cdc2008_091
id cdc2008_091
authors Neumann, Oliver
year 2008
title Digitally Mediated Regional Building Cultures
source First International Conference on Critical Digital: What Matters(s)? - 18-19 April 2008, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge (USA), pp. 91-98
summary Designs are complex energy and material systems and products of diverse cultural, economic, and environmental conditions that engage with their extended context. This approach relates architecture to the discourse on complexity. The design research described in this paper introduces an extended definition of ecology that expands the scope of design discourse beyond the environmental performance of materials and types of construction to broader cultural considerations. Parallel to enabling rich formal explorations, digital modeling and fabrication tools provide a basis for engaging with complex ecologies within which design and building exist. Innovative design applications of digital media emphasize interdependencies between new design methods and their particular context in material science, economy, and culture. In British Columbia, influences of fabrication and building technology are evident in the development of a regional cultural identity that is characterized by wood construction. While embracing digital technology as a key to future development and geographic identity, three collaborative digital wood fabrication projects illustrate distinctions between concepts of complexity and responsiveness and their application in design and construction.
email neumann@oliverneumann.com
last changed 2009/01/07 07:05

_id ijac20075302
id ijac20075302
authors Neumann, Oliver; Schmidt, Daniel
year 2007
title Innovative CNC Timber Framing - Technology and Cultural Expression
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 5 - no. 3, pp. 469-486
summary he design-build project for the outdoor theater roof structure at the UBC Malcolm Knapp Research Forest at Maple Ridge, British Columbia, explores technical, spatial, and cultural aspects of CNC wood fabrication. References for the project are technological innovation and formal expression of contemporary wood structures. The roof project illustrates how spatial concepts are informed by the logic of fabrication and methods of assembly. A reciprocal relationship between technology, space, and locale suggests that the introduction of new technology coincides with new spatial concepts. Innovative design in this project is defined as work that resonates at the intersection of the fields of technology, material science, manufacturing processes, and techniques of assembly that constitute the expanded context that projects need to engage. It is through collaborative design research on CNC wood fabrication technologies that common design and building practice is put into question, and boundaries are explored and expanded.
series journal
last changed 2007/11/20 17:06

_id sigradi2014_341
id sigradi2014_341
authors Paysse Alvarez, Marcelo
year 2014
title ArchiGram/ArchiNet. De la fugacidad móvil a la movilidad fugaz (1964-2014) [ArchiGram/ArchiNet. From mobile transience to fleeting mobility (1964-2014)]
source SiGraDi 2014 [Proceedings of the 18th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-9974-99-655-7] Uruguay - Montevideo 12 - 14 November 2014, pp. 418-421
summary In the early 60s, the British group Archigram created and promoted a new understanding of architecture and land, incorporating with its innovative vision, the scientific paradigms and technological advances of the second half of the twentieth century. The result of these explorations resulted in the emergence of theoretical and concrete proposals with technology as the main protagonist in the physical resulting, through a poiesis which postulated mobile transience as an active paradigm. Fifty years later, today, this situation has similarities and differences with the time it was given, and deserves a special consideration in this topic.
series SIGRADI
email paysse@farq.edu.uy
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id 8847
authors Richens, P.
year 1991
title 3D Interface
source Human Interfaces for Design and Visualisation, British Computer Society, London
series other
email paul.richens@arct.cam.ac.uk
more http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/pubs/
last changed 2000/03/13 19:32

_id 4ec6
authors Richens, P.
year 1997
title Computer-aided Art Direction
source F. Penz and M. Thomas (Eds.) , Cinema & Architecture: Méličs, Mallet-Stevens, Multimedia, British Film Institute, London
summary Computer-aided design for architects began to be possible about 25 years ago; in the last five it has become commonplace. In a few years time, it will be as ubiquitous as the word-processor is today. But the construction industry as a whole is not a sophisticated user of Information Technology. The state of affairs in the film industry is quite different; computer graphics of the utmost sophistication plays an increasingly important part in the production of film, but very little in their design. Is it possible that an opportunity is being missed? This paper is written from the standpoint of a designer of architectural CAD software, and seeks to explore the extent to which computer graphics techniques, which have proved useful in architecture, could be used in Production Design, and the simulation of Cinematography. Several experiments, using commercial software of the sort that architects find useful, have lead to the realisation that much is possible, but that a full realisation of the benefits would require software specially adapted to the task. The bulk of this paper describes the nature of this adaptation; it is in the nature of a preliminary specification for software for Computer-aided art direction. The initial investigation centred on the needs of film students; it has since broadened to look at the needs of established practitioners.
series other
email paul.richens@arct.cam.ac.uk
more http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/pubs/pdfs/rich97a.pdf
last changed 2003/03/05 12:10

_id ga0113
id ga0113
authors Riley, Howard
year 2001
title Drawing as Transformation: From Primary Geometry to Secondary Geometry
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary A distinction is made between primary geometry, the arrangement in space of lines of projection from a 3-D object to a plane of projection, and secondary geometry, the relationships between the points, lines and shapes of the drawn projection on a 2-D surface. Drawing projection systems, such as those classified under British Standard 1192, are illustrated, and are shown to be defined in terms of primary geometry. It is argued that a re-classification of projection systems in terms of secondary geometry enables first-year students of drawing to relate more easily such systems of geometry to their observational experiences. Student drawings illustrate the argument.
series other
email howard.riley@sihe.ac.uk
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id e056
authors Ryan, N.
year 1996
title Computer based visualisation of the past: technical 'realism' and historical credibility
source Imaging the past: electronic imaging and computer graphics in museums and archaeology. P. Main, T. Higgins and J. Lang. London, The British Museum, pp. 95-108
summary Contributed by Susan Pietsch (spietsch@arch.adelaide.edu.au)
keywords 3D City Modeling, Development Control, Design Control
series other
last changed 2001/06/04 18:41

_id 46b0
authors Schijf, Rik
year 1986
title CAD in the Netherlands: Integrated CAD
source Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [CAAD Futures Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-408-05300-3] Delft (The Netherlands), 18-19 September 1985, pp. 176-184
summary One of the things in which a small country can excel is its number of architects' offices per inhabitant. In the Netherlands this is approximately one in 6500, or twice the UK density (CBS, 1984; CICA, 1982). Of the 2150 Dutch offices, 88 per cent employ less than 10 people, which compares rather well with the British Situation. For the Netherlands it is interesting that its boom in CAD, on average an annual doubling or tripling for the next few years, is likely to coincide with a revolution in CAD itself. There is no doubt that very soon the personal and larger CAD systems will clash at supermicro-level.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id caadria2007_263
id caadria2007_263
authors Shaheen, Abeer; H. Elkadi
year 2007
title ICT & Reflective Education in an Environmentally ResponsiveArchitecture Studio
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary The current debate of architecture education in UK Schools of Architecture is reviewed with special emphasis on environmental ingredients of the traditional and progressive curriculum. Environmental approach to design has far more benefits than just informing students of the basics of the ecological and urban settings. Traditionally, UK Schools of Architecture address these issues via required courses (RIBA, 2003) However, environmental forces, wide array of educational innovations and a number of conditions and performance criteria that are set by Royal Institute of British Architects RIBA, for architectural education curriculum are essential drivers that necessitated transforming architectural pedagogy. As a result, new themes are being woven across existing courses, and more attention is being accorded to pedagogical methods of delivery using Information and Communication Technology ICT.
series CAADRIA
email a.shaheen@ulster.ac.uk
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

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