CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 28

_id a172
authors Brian Jeffrey Palidar
year 2000
title Live and Direct:A Research and Development Facility for Robotics and Artificial Intelligence Applications
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary This thesis proposed a design project focusing on creating a center for the incorporation, assembly, and demonstration of cutting edge research in AI applications. The project s client is an Institute dedicated to developing the platform for general intelligence by assembling current research and technologies into composite prototypes that push the boundaries of artificial beings. This center also proposes an interactive forum in which the general public can experience the results of the research first hand as well as learn about past projects, attend lectures and presentations, and other activities related to this endeavor and its implications to humanity.
series thesis:MSc
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id acadia19_278
id acadia19_278
authors Ca?izares, Galo
year 2019
title Digital Suprematism
source ACADIA 19:UBIQUITY AND AUTONOMY [Proceedings of the 39th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-578-59179-7] (The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture, Austin, Texas 21-26 October, 2019) pp. 278-287
summary It is widely held that sometime around 2006, the World Wide Web as we knew it mutated into Web 2.0. This colloquial label signaled a shift from an Internet designed for us to an Internet designed by us. Nowhere was this more explicitly stated than in Time Magazine’s 2006 Person of the Year selection: You. More than a decade later, Internet browsers have evolved into ubiquitous interfaces accessible from mobile devices, tablet computers, public kiosks, workstations, laptops, etc. It would, therefore, not be an overstatement to say that the browser is the most widespread content canvas in the world. Designers frequently use web browsers for their ability to exhibit and organize content. They are the sites for portfolios, announcements, magazines, and at times, discussions. But despite its flexibility and rich infrastructure, rarely is the browser used to generate design elements. Thanks to advanced web development languages like JavaScript and open-source code libraries, such as p5.JS, Matter.JS, and Three.JS, browsers now support interactive and spatial content. Typically, these tools are used to generate gimmicks or visual effects, such as the parallax illusion or the infinite scroll. But if we perceive the browser as a timebased picture plane, we can immediately recognize its architectonic potential. This paper puts forth a method for engaging the creative potential of web-based media and Internet browsers. Through example projects, I argue that the Internet browser is a highly complex spatial plane that warrants more architectural analysis and experimentation.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email canizares.1@osu.edu
last changed 2019/12/18 08:03

_id 9c87
authors Camarata, Ken
year 2001
title Navigational Blocks (an interplay between the physical and the virtual)
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary The Navigational Blocks project demonstrates a tangible user interface that facilitates retrieval of historical stories in a tourist spot. Orientation, movement, and relative positions of physical Blocks support visitor navigation and exploration in a virtual gallery. The Navigational Blocks system provides a physical embodiment of digital information through tactile manipulation and haptic feedback. The simple cubic form of the Blocks is easy to understand and therefore easy to use to manipulate complex digital information. Electromagnets embedded in the Blocks and wireless communication encourage users to quickly rearrange the Blocks to form different database queries.
series thesis:MSc
email ken@wiredarchitect.com
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id 8cc7
authors Chen, Julie
year 2002
title DAM: Digital Animation Museum
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary The interaction of architecture and technology is, to many, simply a relationship between a building and the materials from which it is constructed. This thesis, however, explores the notion that architectural spaces and forms are influenced not only by construction technology, but also by everyday technology that we use to better our lives, and particularly focuses on the potential impact of wireless information technology on architecture. This thesis asserts that the implementation of information technology in architecture encourages greater interactivity between building and visitor and also increases flexibility in spatial programming. By incorporating wireless information technology as an essential design element of a museum, traditional notions of control points can be eliminated, and the building experience may be manipulated in a variety of ways to interact with and respond to visitor interests and preferences. In this way, both building and visitors are able to collaborate to produce a unique and individualized experience of the building space.
series thesis:MSc
email ix@u.washington.edu
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id 389b
authors Do, Ellen Yi-Luen
year 2000
title Sketch that Scene for Me: Creating Virtual Worlds by Freehand Drawing
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 265-268
summary With the Web people can now view virtual threedimensional worlds and explore virtual space. Increasingly, novice users are interested in creating 3D Web sites. Virtual Reality Modeling Language gained ISO status in 1997, although it is being supplanted by the compatible Java3D API and alternative 3D Web technologies compete. Viewing VRML scenes is relatively straightforward on most hardware platforms and browsers, but currently there are only two ways to create 3D virtual scenes: One is to code the scene directly using VRML. The other is to use existing CAD and modeling software, and save the world in VRML format or convert to VRML from some other format. Both methods are time consuming, cumbersome, and have steep learning curves. Pen-based user interfaces, on the other hand, are for many an easy and intuitive method for graphics input. Not only are people familiar with the look and feel of paper and pencil, novice users also find it less intimidating to draw what they want, where they want it instead of using a complicated tool palette and pull-down menus. Architects and designers use sketches as a primary tool to generate design ideas and to explore alternatives, and numerous computer-based interfaces have played on the concept of "sketch". However, we restrict the notion of sketch to freehand drawing, which we believe helps people to think, to envision, and to recognize properties of the objects with which they are working. SKETCH employs a pen interface to create three-dimensional models, but it uses a simple language of gestures to control a three-dimensional modeler; it does not attempt to interpret freehand drawings. In contrast, our support of 3D world creation using freehand drawing depend on users’ traditional understanding of a floor plan representation. Igarashi et al. used a pen interface to drive browsing in a 3D world, by projecting the user’s marks on the ground plane in the virtual world. Our Sketch-3D project extends this approach, investigating an interface that allows direct interpretation of the drawing marks (what you draw is what you get) and serves as a rapid prototyping tool for creating 3D virtual scenes.
keywords Freehand Sketching, Pen-Based User Interface, Interaction, VRML, Navigation
series eCAADe
email ellendo@cmu.edu
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2004/10/04 05:49

_id ebd0
authors Eggink, Dustin
year 2001
title Smart Objects: Constraints and Behaviors in a Dimensional Design
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary Each new design problem in architecture presents a new set of requirements .A designer must remain aware of these requirements and effectively communicate them to collaborators because the degree to which the requirements are met will determine the success of the solution. This thesis explores how design can be effectively presented in a medium that is both explorative of form and descriptive of the design problem’s requirements. To facilitate this, we present Smart Objects, a constraint-based three-dimensional(3D) computer program. In Smart Objects, design intentions of an architectural problem are embedded as constraints into the modeled objects that compose a formal solution. A model is presented through a 3DVirtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) viewer and constrained by a software program we wrote in the Java language. Both the VRML viewer and the Java program are contained within a single web page. In Smart Objectsd. A designer meets or violates constraints, objects behave in a manner that reflects the requirements of the problem and intentions of the designer. SmartObjects communicates the design principles and guidelines that inform an architectural design to the collaborators involved in the project. It ensures that these principles and guidelines are maintained as the design progresses.
series thesis:MSc
email eggink@u.washington.edu
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id sigradi2012_263
id sigradi2012_263
authors Espina, Jane
year 2012
title Procesos, Metodología y Prácticas en Urbanismo: flujo continuo de datos e información en sectores urbanos de la ciudad [Processes, and Practices Methodology Urbanism: continuous flow of data and information in city’s urban areas]
source SIGraDi 2012 [Proceedings of the 16th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Brasil - Fortaleza 13-16 November 2012, pp. 294-298
summary Technology provides new digital tools for the benefit of the Planning and Urban Design. The goal of this paper is to show a methodology for the interpretation and analysis of the urban site in the city of Maracaibo, Venezuela; and its implementation as academic experience in the Department of Urban Planning. The use of digital and communication technologies in teaching strategies and instructional resources, achieved profits in the teaching-learning process, optimized collection processes, organization and flow of data and information, understanding of the urban fact. Tools used: mobile telephony, internet, browsers, applications, improving communication between students, student-teacher, student-teacher-community.
keywords Work Methodology; Planning; Urban Areas; Digital Technology; Interpretation and Site Analysis
series SIGRADI
email jjespina@yahoo.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id ae8a
authors Hanson, Gabriel Quinn
year 2001
title Connection & Transition, Exploring Place-Based Physical Environment in a Digital Media FirmPhysical Environment in a Digital Media Firm
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary The design solution of the typical high-tech firm bombards its employees with the same signs and sleek coded information that they are designing, instead of addressing their innate biological needs. In the workplace specifically, the change in technology has a pernicious result when its relationships are deployed society-wide as subsitutes for face-to face interactions, which are inherently richer than mediated interactions. This thesis presents a design of a media firm that engages build environment with lighting and natural and a CD-Rom digital sketchbookof the design process.
series thesis:MSc
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id ef9e
authors Harris, Robert
year 2001
title The Digital Sandbox: Integrating Design and Analysis in a new Earth-forming Tool
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary The design solution of the typical high-tech firm bombards its employees with the same signs and sleek coded information that they are designing, instead of addressing their innate biological needs. In the workplace specifically, the change in technology has a pernicious result when its relationships are deployed society-wide as subsitutes for face-to face interactions, which are inherently richer than mediated interactions. This thesis presents a design of a media firm that engages build environment with lighting and natural and a CD-Rom digital sketchbookof the design process.
series thesis:MSc
email rmharris@u.washington.edu
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id ascaad2010_249
id ascaad2010_249
authors Hawker, Ronald; Dina Elkady and Thomas Tucker.
year 2010
title Not Just Another Pretty Face
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 249-260
summary Digital Heritage has gained popularity recently as means of dynamically representing and reconstructing historic buildings and cityscapes. Simultaneously this new medium of visualization affords another approach to examine human-virtual environment interaction and offers possibilities of exploiting virtual environments as educational tools. At Zayed University, a federal university primarily for women citizens of the United Arab Emirates, we have integrated student-faculty research and documented and reconstructed a number of historical buildings within the curriculum of the Department of Art and Design. We have further collaborated with the animation program at Winston Salem State University in North Carolina, utilizing the motion capture laboratory at the Center of Design Innovation to literally breathe life into these reconstructions. The primary idea is to contribute to the ongoing documentation of the country’s heritage through creating “responsive virtual heritage environments” where the spectator is actively engaged in exploring the digital space and gain certain degrees of control over the course and scheme of the dynamic experience. The process begins by introducing students to utilize the diverse capabilities of CAD and three dimensional computer applications and intertwine the technical skills they acquire to construct virtual computer models of indigenous built environments. The workflow between the different applications is crucial to stimulate students’ problem solving abilities and tame the application tools, specifically when constructing complex objects and structural details. In addition the spatial and temporal specificity different computer applications afford has proven useful in highlighting and analyzing the buildings’ function within the extreme climate of the country and their role in the political-economy, particularly in visualizing the ephemeral qualities of the architecture as they relate to passive cooling and the inter-relationships between built and natural environments. Light and time settings clarify shadow casting and explain the placement and orientation of buildings. Particle simulations demonstrate the harnessing of wind and rain both urban and rural settings. The quantitative data accumulated and charted through CAD and VR programs and geo-browsers can be integrated with qualitative data to create a more holistic analytical framework for understanding the complex nature of past settlement patterns. In addition, the dynamic nature of this integration creates a powerful educational tool. This paper reviews this ongoing research project with examples of reconstructions completed across the country, demonstrating analytical and educational possibilities through the integration of CAD programs with a range of other statistical, geographic, and visualization software.
series ASCAAD
email ronald.hawker@zu.ac.ae
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id 2fd6
authors Johnson, Brian R.
year 2001
title Unfocused Interaction in Distributed Workgroups. Establishing group presence in a web-based environment
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 401-414
summary Face-to-face human interaction is divided into "focused" and "unfocused" types. Unfocused interaction often conveys important content and context information and contributes to group cohesiveness and effectiveness. Research in Computer Mediated Communication (CMC) and Computer Supported Collaborative Work (CSCW) is also concerned with human interaction. CMC tools, such as electronic mail, and CSCW tools, such as Decision Support Systems (DSS) and Group Support Systems (GSS) provide for focused interaction among members of distributed workgroups. However, little has been published regarding unfocused interaction in distributed workgroups, where group members' primary work activities hold "center-stage" and communication activities are peripheral, though this describes many distributed educational and work situations. A framework for studying this type of support using standard web browsers and server applications is described, and informal preliminary results are discussed. Opportunities for future support of peripheral awareness and unfocused interaction are also discussed.
keywords Distributed Workgroups, Unfocused Interaction, Presence, Collaboration
series CAAD Futures
email brj@u.washington.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 7eed
authors Koti, Vijayalakshmi
year 1997
title Hypermedia in Architectural Education: The World Wide Web as a Learning Tool
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary Consideration of the World Wide Web as a tool for architectural education, especially through the production, presentation, and cataloging of critical case studies of buildings. Focuses on development of a collaborative paradigm for distributed development of such information through a case study template and central catalog web site. Includes an sample case study.
series thesis:MSc
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id 4cd0
authors Lee, Ming-Chun
year 2001
title SpaceMaker: A Symbol-based Three-dimensional Computer Modeling Tool for Early Schematic Development of the Architectural Design
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary Designing architecture is an action of creating space. Architects start designing by making twodimensional (2-D) drawings in order to explore alternatives of spatial arrangement. However, architects are actually working with three-dimensional (3-D) space. They see 3-D space in their mind’s eye when making sketches in 2-D. It is thus valuable to help designers truly see 3-D space during designing. In addition, different spaces may have different functions and configurations of architectural components. Architects usually use text labels in their drawings to identify architectural concepts. They identify the function of space and remind themselves of the proposed configuration of architectural elements when labeling each space with a symbol. By recognizing the text label, it is possible to identify the architectural configuration of the space. Therefore, it is possible to create a 3-D modeling tool based on the recognition of labels in freehand sketches. This thesis introduces a symbol-based 3-D modeling tool – the SpaceMaker – that allows designers to make freehand floor-plan drawings to explore the initial concept of spatial layout and allows users to apply labels to identify different types of space. Finally, the program converts those floor plans into 3-D models according to the labels. In the SpaceMaker, a designer predefines a label by assigning it four boundary elements that encircle a space. When the designer draws the label in the sketch floor plan, the SpaceMaker then recognizes the label and constructs the space based on the defined boundary condition in a VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) format that enables the designer to view the 3-D space through a VRML enabled web browser.
series thesis:MSc
email mingchun@u.washington.edu
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id f109
authors Luis Fernando Borrero
year 2001
title Deliver E room : a new physical space for the residential units to come
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary The need to allocate vendors of the 13th century castles gave origin to a large hall where all could gather,work and sleep.The need of ice boxes to be constantly replenished in the early 20th century gave origin to the ice/service entrance in many houses.In the 1950 ’s the milkman model brought also the milk- box,a unit to be installed or built into customer’s homes. Once again,deliveries will influence the architecture of the households,fueled this time by the e-commerce economy. Soon, a new appliance that will enable the unattended delivery of physical goods is going to be part of future households,and architects will have to plan ahead in order to accommodate this necessity of the Internet world. The space for this appliance, the deliver Eroom,will have to be accessible from the interior and exterior of the house, allow enough capacity for the appliance that must accommodate most if not all deliveries,and access to it will most probably be controlled through the Net.
series thesis:MSc
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id 3849
authors Luttermann, H. and Grauer, M.
year 1999
title VRML History: Storing And Browsing Temporal 3DWorlds
source Proceedings of the fourth symposium on the virtual reality modeling language, ACM Press, pp. 153-160
summary Spatio-temporal data are presented and explored by VR-based visualization systems which offer 3D-navigation and time-navigation for better immersion and analysis. If the visualization results are disseminated on the WWW, they are mostly transformed into videos or, recently, into animated VRML-files which neither support 3D-navigation nor time navigation nor a time-referenced data representation. In this paper, the script language VRML History is proposed which supports the description of spatio-temporal worlds on the internet by conceptually extending VRML with a new time dimension. This is realized by a set of new nodes representing temporal geometries and time references, and a set of Java-classes extending standard VRML-browsers to perform time navigation.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 422f
authors Morozumi, M., Shounai, Y., Homma, R., Iki, K. and Murakami, Y.
year 1999
title A Group Ware for Asynchronous Design Communication and Project Management
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 171-180
summary The number of Virtual Design Studio experiment that used WWW (Digital Pin-up Board) and e-mail for a synchronous communication, is rapidly increasing. There is no doubt that those media are quite helpful, but it also became clear that writing and managing pages of DPB require extra work for designers and technical staff to proceed with collaborative design. To make VDS a popular approach of collaborative design, developing convenient tools to support writing and managing pages of DPB has become inevitable. This paper discusses a prototype of group ware that supports asynchronous design communication with DPB: GW-Notebook that can be used with common web browsers on net-PCs.
series CAADRIA
email moro@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
last changed 2003/05/17 07:54

_id ijac20042303
id ijac20042303
authors Ruffle, Simon; Richens, Paul
year 2004
title Stylist and Scaleable – Vector Graphics for All on the Web
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 2 - no. 3, 333-350
summary Raster graphics are ubiquitous on the web, but many architectural and engineering applications would be better served by vector techniques. Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) is an emerging XML based vector graphics standard from the World Wide Web Consortium, but is not yet implemented in mainstream browsers. We describe a way of using the widely distributed Macromedia Flash Player to display SVG files. The resulting drawings are easy to rescale and restyle within the browser, offer superior printing, and many possibilities for advanced interaction and animation.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id sigradi2005_689
id sigradi2005_689
authors Ruiz-Rodarte, Rocio; José Larios, Fernando García Cuspinera
year 2005
title Real Time Visualizing Tools: Description of an experience where game engines and Internet browsers are used as means of exhibition at an archaeological site
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 689-694
summary This paper presents the use of Virtual Reality (VR) environments as didactic means of exhibition. It approaches VR field by non traditional tools of visualization -as game engines- and describes the process and particular issues faced during its development. The examples shown in this document are part of an archaeological project under current development which faced budget solutions for equipment and its maintenance. The lack of experience outside the traditional VR field (SGI), lead the research team to try different game engines and VRML format in explore solutions to issues as performance, complexity, appearance, visualization, different needs of programming skills, file format compatibility, archiving and promotion applications. The experience delivered to replicate the process for other cultural projects can be useful also to architects and designers that are willing to experiment with VR as means of visualization during different stages of their projects.
series SIGRADI
email caruiz@itesm.mx
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id f80f
authors Samiaji, Doddy
year 2001
title Development Simulator
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary Development Simulator is a 3D simulation design application for architects and urban designers. Written in Visual Basic environment, using COM and ActiveX, it serves as a decision-making-support-system that reveals the impact of development numbers to three dimensional building form. The tool combines the power of a drawing program, AutoCAD 2000 and a spreadsheet program, Excel 2000. Development Simulator runs in Windows 2000.
series thesis:MSc
email doddys@u.washington.edu
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id f85b
authors Sasada, Tsuyoshi
year 1995
title Computer Graphics as a Communication Medium in the Design Process
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 3-5
summary During the last ten years at the Sasada Lab of Osaka University, we have been using Computer graphics for presentation, design review, and design for practical architectural design projects. Computer graphics, including computer generated animation, is a powerful communication medium, and makes collaborative work easy. Nowadays, computer graphics technology is melting with networking technology, and many hot new technologies are being created. Among these new technologies, we find technologies such as VRML and 3-D browsers that should be the key to progress for 3-D design in an architectural design process. This paper demonstrates how these new technologies solve Problems of 3-D design in the architectural design process.
keywords Computer Graphics, 3-D Design, VRML, 3-D Browsing, Collaborative Work
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/08/03 15:16

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