CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id ga0013
id ga0013
authors Annunziato, Mauro and Pierucci, Piero
year 2000
title Artificial Worlds, Virtual Generations
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The progress in the scientific understanding/simulation of the evolution mechanisms and the first technological realizations (artificial life environments, robots, intelligent toys, self reproducing machines, agents on the web) are creating the base of a new age: the coming of the artificial beings and artificial societies. Although this aspect could seems a technological conquest, by our point of view it represent the foundation of a new step in the human evolution. The anticipation of this change is the development of a new cultural paradigm inherited from the theories of evolution and complexity: a new way to think to the culture, aesthetics and intelligence seen as emergent self-organizing qualities of a collectivity evolved along the time through genetic and language evolution. For these reasons artificial life is going to be an anticipatory and incredibly creative area for the artistic expression and imagination. In this paper we try to correlate some elements of the present research in the field of artificial life, art and technological grow up in order to trace a path of development for the creation of digital worlds where the artificial beings are able to evolve own culture, language and aesthetics and they are able to interact con the human people.Finally we report our experience in the realization of an interactive audio-visual art installation based on two connected virtual worlds realized with artificial life environments. In these worlds,the digital individuals can interact, reproduce and evolve through the mechanisms of genetic mutations. The real people can interact with the artificial individuals creating an hybrid ecosystem and generating emergent shapes, colors, sound architectures and metaphors for imaginary societies, virtual reflections of the real worlds.
series other
email plancton@plancton.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id sigradi2008_103
id sigradi2008_103
authors Baltazar, Ana Paula; Maria Lucia Malard, Silke Kapp, Pedro Schultz
year 2008
title From physical models to immersive collaborative environments: testing the best way for homeless people to visualise and negotiate spaces
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary This paper describes an experiment to investigate the best way for lay people to use representation to visualise and negotiate space. It was motivated by our observations in workshops for digital inclusion in the context of a housing project for a homeless association. Computers were used to make it easier for the community to understand and change the spaces in real time. The first workshops proved that our approach was efficient as an exercise but not certainly effective concerning the understanding of spatial qualities. So we have designed an experiment to compare the usability of different media in participatory design processes. For that we have adapted the ‘Usability’ methodology, which is fully described in the paper. We started with three main questions. The first concerned the effectiveness of different media to represent spatial quality; the second concerned the best way for novices to approach space, whether by refurbishing a pre-existing space or by starting from the scratch; and the third concerned the effectiveness of negotiation by means of discourse and by means of or action. We also had two main hypothesis: one coming from research on digital environments and stereo visualisation, indicating that the more people feel immersed in the represented environment the more they are able to correlate it with physical space; and the other coming from our own observations in the participatory design workshops, in which the collective decision-making was manipulated by those people with more advanced communication skills who use their ability in an authoritative way regardless of the relevance of what they have to say. This paper describes the whole experiment, which was an exercise of spatial negotiation in 5 versions. In the first version we provided fixed digital views of a room in plan and axonometry; for another two versions we provided a physical model of the room in 1:10 scale, with some pieces of the existing furniture in different scales. This was done to check if people were just playing with a puzzle or actually grasping the correspondence between representation and the object or the space represented. One version proposes refurbishment and the other starts from the scratch. And the last two versions repeated the same task made with the physical model, but this time using a 3D interactive digital model. People were required not only to organise the furniture in the space but also to build a full scale cardboard structure and organise the real furniture reproducing their proposed model. Their comments on the spaces they had built confronted with what they had imaged when working with the model has enabled us to compare the different models, as also the different ways of negotiating spaces. This paper describes this experiment in detail concluding that 3D digital interactive models are far more effective than physical models and 2D drawings; when negotiation happens by means of action it provides more creative results than when the discoursive practice prevails; people are more creative when they start something from scratch, though they spend more time. The results of this experiment led us to formulate a new hypothesis leading to the development of an immersive collaborative environment using stereoscopy.
keywords Visualisation, negotiation, immersive environment, digital interfaces, homeless people
series SIGRADI
email anapaulabaltazar@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id c7f4
authors Bancroft, Pamela J. (ed.)
year 1988
title Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings]
source ACADIA ‘88 Conference Proceedings /Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, 311 p.
summary Progress is being made towards integrating computing into architectural design. This progress is not being made in a coordinated and systematic manner, which is actually a positive factor. Architects will never be scientists or engineers, who hold the distinguishing characteristic of being masters of the scientific method. We have never been so incumbered, although we certainly have given it our best effort.

Architects are creative problem solvers, primarily driven by intuition, while coming from a sense of the past and the logic of the present. Our initial attempts at integrating computing into the studio, as evidenced by this collection of papers, is very diverse, based on differing pedagogical assumptions, and the achieving of significantly different results. This would appear to be evidence of a revolutionary approach to the problem rather than a scientific evolutionary approach. Terrific! This is when we as architects are at our best. Although we reach a great number of emphatically dead ends, the successes and discoveries achieved along the way are significant.

The diversity and quality of papers submitted suggest that we are indeed pursuing the task of integration in our typical, individual, intuitive, logical manner. I commend all of the authors who submitted proposals and thank them for expanding the envelope of integration into their personal exploration.

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/01/01 18:21

_id 62c0
authors Barrallo, Javier and Iglesias, Alberto
year 1996
title Cybersculpture
source Approaches to Computer Aided Architectural Composition [ISBN 83-905377-1-0] 1996, pp. 35-43
summary From the first artistic expressions of mankind, the Mathematics has influence the shapes and proportions presents in the different artistic disciplines. The coming of Abstract art and modern Mathematics at the beginning of the century supposed a complete renovation of the way of understand the relationship between Mathematics and Art, reinforced by the huge expansion of computers nowadays. Chaos Theory or Fractal Geometry constitute examples of this tendencies, that normally are expressed in the two dimensional plane. The idea of this work consists on the utilisation of a series of elements from the contemporaneous Mathematics to express them in an artistic way in the three dimensional space. The result is a family of objects that we have called CYBERSCULPTURES, due to their sculptural character and the fact that they have Internet as their virtual museum.
series other
last changed 1999/04/08 15:16

_id sigradi2006_k001
id sigradi2006_k001
authors Batty, Michael
year 2006
title Visualizing the City
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 23-26
summary In this lecture, I will describe the history of how cities have become the focus for visualization, for developing new ideas and tools as well as for demonstrating their wider applicability to design and policy-making processes. There are many variants on this theme of visualizing cities and I will attempt to set these in context as well as describing some of the challenges to the field which will dictate the research agenda in the coming years.
series SIGRADI
type keynote paper
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 6ddf
authors Bessone, B., Mantovani, G. and Galuzzi, S.
year 2001
title SEIS AÑOS DE EXPERIENCIA ENTRE LO ANÁLOGO Y LO DIGITAL (Six Years of Experience Between the Analogue and the Digital)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 179-182
summary This paper intends to contribute Architecture I Experimental Workshops for a basis of knowledge, coming up from experimenting and investigating on pedagogical strategies, during the last decades of technological media changes. A temporal cutting sustained by two specific situations is proposed. Students´ processes: Beginners in ´96 are thesists now and learning result are evaluated. Educators´ processes: An interdisciplinary group including different subjects and skills was formed. A “Preliminary Test” checking methodological instruments was considered. After having done appropiate changes, traditional design processes were compared with new ones in order to continue with the Investigating Program.
series SIGRADI
email mbessone@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2005_438
id sigradi2005_438
authors Bessone, Miriam; Ricardo Pérez Miró, Isabel Molinas
year 2005
title Digital visualization and new intellectual associations among language - music - architecture
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 438-443
summary Throughout history, architecture has transposed contributions bound to structuralist focus or to musical composition. This is from linguistic and music respectively. New visualization systems show the possibility to give transpositions a new meaning, form the potentialities of hypermedia; locking for new projects parameters. This papers will show experimental workshop results developed within CI+D 2000 “New speeches and design process”. They study links and explore our work interrelating word – music and image. These processes are developed by people coming from literature, visual arts, music, and architecture areas. Lastly, the first results will be shown. Since parameters were transposed from music, by using NURBS forms, space prefiguration is tried out. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email mbessone@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2005_749
id sigradi2005_749
authors Bessone, Miriam; Susana Garramuño de Galuzzi
year 2005
title Design education, technology and visualization
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 749-754
summary University faculty -adult culture- work from the logic that goes through their speech, didactic model and strategies, providing special links with: the aim of knowledge, transmission mechanisms and technological medium. Students -young culture- receive and deal with knowledge mechanisms from a new logic. In a multimedia framework they establish interpretations using technological medium from semantic decodification. Young graduates, assistants, studio leaders -intermediate culture- coming from traditional learning models with acquired abilities in digital media, are a “potential interface” between both cultures. The impact between fields and cultures implies limitations and risks that may encourage change. A discourse about “new didactic configurations” from the point of view of these three cultures makes possible the exploration of other ways of teaching. Therefore the articulation of teacher-student interrelations and media promotes the development of teaching-learning techniques. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email mbessone@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 186e
authors Blinn, J.F. and Newell, M.E.
year 1976
title Texture and Reflection in Computer Generated Images
source Communications of the ACM 19 10 542-547
summary In 1974 Catmull developed a new algorithm for rendering images of bivariate surface patches. This paper describes extensions of this algorithm in the areas of texture simulation and lighting models. The parametrization of a patch defines a coordinate system which is used as a key for mapping patterns onto the surface. The intensity of the pattern at each picture element is computed as a weighted average of regions of the pattern definition function. The shape and size of this weighting function are chosen using digital signal processing theory. The patch rendering algorithm allows accurate computation of the surface normal to the patch at each picture element, permitting the simulation of mirror reflections. The amount of light coming from a given direction is modeled in a similar manner to the texture mapping and then added to the intensity obtained from the texture mapping. Several examples of images synthesized using these new techniques are included.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 62c4
authors Blinn, James F. and Newell, Martin E.
year 1976
title Texture and Reflection in Computer Generated Images
source communications of the ACM October, 1976. vol. 19: pp. 542-547 : ill. (col.). includes bibliography.
summary In 1974 Catmull developed a new algorithm for rendering images of bivariate surface patches. This paper describes extensions of this algorithm in the areas of texture simulation and lighting models. The parametrization of a patch defines a coordinate system which is used as a key for mapping patterns onto the surface. The intensity of the pattern at each picture element is computed as a weighted average of regions of the pattern definition function. The shape and size of this weighting function are chosen using digital signal processing theory. The patch rendering algorithm allows accurate computation of the surface normal to the patch at each picture element, permitting the simulation of mirror reflections. The amount of light coming from a given direction is modeled in a similar manner to the texture mapping and then added to the intensity obtained from the texture mapping. Several examples of images synthesized using these new techniques are included
keywords algorithms, computer graphics, shading, hidden surfaces, texture mapping, curved surfaces, rendering
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id ecba
authors Bosco, Antonio
year 1996
title Hypertext for Building Rehabilitation. A didactic Use of an Innovative Methodology of Diagnosis of the Building Decay
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 59-64
summary In the paper presented in the last ECAADE conference in Palermo we described a first hypertext for the analysis of ancient buildings. One section of the hypertext was devoted to show diagnostic procedures and specific instrumental tests for building rehabilitation. We can consider that the hypertext represent the best answer to the request of an organised knowledge coming from students of the schools of architecture and public operators. So we describe how the proposed arrangement of the diagnostic tests can become a real operative tool technicians of public agencies and powerful means of building technology knowledge for students too. The diagnostic procedures are related to the specific needs of the architectural design; changing ways to archive the tests are showed. The goal is to allow the architects, operating in the rehabilitation field, to operate the right choice of diagnostic methods to avoid doing many unnecessary, expensive tests.
series eCAADe
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id af53
authors Boyer, E. and Mitgang, L.
year 1996
title Building community: a new future for architecture education and practice
source Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching
summary Internships, before and after graduation, are the most essential link connecting students to the world of practice. Yet, by all accounts, internship is perhaps the most troubled phase of the continuing education of architects. During this century, as architectural knowledge grew more complex, the apprenticeship system withered away and schools assumed much of the responsibility for preparing architects for practice. However, schools cannot do the whole job. It is widely acknowledged that certain kinds of technical and practical knowledge are best learned in the workplace itself, under the guidance of experienced professionals. All state accrediting boards require a minimum period of internship-usually about three years-before a person is eligible to take the licensing exam. The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) allows students to earn up to two years of work credit prior to acquisition of an accredited degree. The Intern Development Program (IDP), launched by NCARB and the American Institute of Architects in 1979, provides the framework for internship in some forty states. The program was designed to assure that interns receive adequate mentoring, that experiences are well-documented, and that employers and interns allocate enough time to a range of educational and vocational experiences to prepare students for eventual licensure. As the IDP Guidelines state, "The shift from school to office is not a transition from theory to pragmatism. It is a period when theory merges with pragmatism.... It's a time when you: apply your formal education to the daily realities of architectural practice; acquire comprehensive experience in basic practice areas; explore specialized areas of practice; develop professional judgment; continue your formal education in architecture; and refine your career goals." Whatever its accomplishments, however, we found broad consensus that the Intern Development Program has not, by itself, solved the problems of internship. Though we found mutually satisfying internship programs at several of the firms we visited or heard about around the country, at many others interns told us they were not receiving the continuing education and experience they needed. The truth is that architecture has serious, unsolved problems compared with other fields when it comes to supplying on-the-job learning experiences to induct students into the profession on a massive scale. Medicine has teaching hospitals. Beginning teachers work in actual classrooms, supported by school taxes. Law offices are, for the most part, in a better financial position to support young lawyers and pay them living wages. The architecture profession, by contrast, must support a required system of internship prior to licensure in an industry that has neither the financial resources of law or medicine, the stability and public support of teaching, nor a network of locations like hospitals or schools where education and practice can be seamlessly connected. And many employers acknowledged those problems. "The profession has all but undermined the traditional relationship between the profession and the academy," said Neil Frankel, FAIA, executive vice president of Perkins & Will, a multinational firm with offices in New York, Chicago, Washington, and London. "Historically, until the advent of the computer, the profession said, 'Okay, go to school, then we in the profession will teach you what the real world is like.' With the coming of the computer, the profession needed a skill that students had, and has left behind the other responsibilities." One intern told us she had been stuck for months doing relatively menial tasks such as toilet elevations. Another intern at a medium-sized firm told us he had been working sixty to seventy hours per week for a year and a half. "Then my wife had a baby and I 'slacked off' to fifty hours. The partner called me in and I got called on the carpet for not working hard enough." "The whole process of internship is being outmoded by economics," one frustrated intern told us. "There's not the time or the money. There's no conception of people being groomed for careers. The younger staff are chosen for their value as productive workers." "We just don't have the best structure here to use an intern's abilities to their best," said a Mississippi architect. "The people who come out of school are really problems. I lost patience with one intern who was demanding that I switch him to another section so that he could learn what he needed for his IDP. I told him, 'It's not my job to teach you. You are here to produce.'" What steps might help students gain more satisfying work opportunities, both during and after graduation?
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 276c
authors Breen, Jack
year 1995
title Dynamic Perspective: The Media Research Programme
source The Future of Endoscopy [Proceedings of the 2nd European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-114-4]
summary This paper focuses on the Research Programme of the Media Sector at the Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology. The media research objectives for the coming years have been brought together with an overall project: “Dynamic Perspective”. The “dynamic” quality may be interpreted both as movement (visual displacement and registration) and as change (the effects of different options).

The four projects which together make up this research programme deal with perception (understanding) and conception (designing and imaging) of urban space: “the architecture of the city”. Specific aspects are the effects of primary and secondary spatial boundaries and the systematic structuring of simulation of visual information. The programme will further concentrate on the development and implementation of relevant techniques (besides “traditional” ones such as the drawing and the architectural model, on multimedia techniques such as endoscopy, computer visualization and development of virtual reality systems), both in education and in design practice.

By means of analysis, the creation of visual models of choice and the setting up of experiments, the programme aims at the furthering of theoretical knowledge and at acquiring better insights into the effects of design decisions at an urban level, both for designers and for other participants in the design process. Further development of existing laboratory facilities towards a comprehensive Design Simulation Laboratory is an important aspect of the programme.

Within the media research process the Aspern location master plan has been considered as a case study, the findings of which will be presented separately in the workshop sessions.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy, Real Environments
series EAEA
email j.l.h.breen@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id sigradi2008_077
id sigradi2008_077
authors Briones, Carolina
year 2008
title A collaborative project experience in an architectural framework, working with Open Source applications and physical computing [Diseño de Plataformas Digitales e Interactivas: una experiencia educativa trabajando colaborativamente con aplicaciones de Código Abierto y Computación Física]
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary Nowadays, thanks to the telecommunication revolution and therefore the massive spread of Internet, we have seen the come up of international architectural offices with branches located in different continent, working in a collaborative fashion, surpassing physical and time frontiers. At the same time, the multidisciplinary work between designers, architects, engineers, programmers and even biologist, between others, have been taking place in the new network society. All transformations also supported by the arising of FOSS (Free Open Source Software) and the virtual communities behind them, which allow the creation of non-traditional or specific software, the association between disciplines, and also, the formation of meeting scenarios for a mixture of individuals coming up with multiple motivation to coexist in collaborative environment. Furthermore, it is possible to argue that Open Source applications are also the reflection of a social movement, based on the open creation and exchange of information and knowledge. Do the appeared of FOSS compel us to re-think our working and teaching methods? Do they allow new modes of organizing and collaborating inside our architectural practices?. This paper would like to address these questions, by presenting the results of the “Experience Design” course, which by implementing teaching methods based on Open Source principles and cutting-edge tools, seeks to approach students to these new “way of do”, knowledge and methodologies, and overall, focus them on the science behind the computer. This paper describes the “Experience Design” course, in which architectural graduate students of Universidad Diego Portales (Chile), put for first time their hands on the creation of interactive interfaces. By acquiring basic knowledge of programming and physical computing, students built in a collaborative way a responsive physical installation. The course use as applications “Processing” and “Arduino”. The first one is an Open Source programming language and environment for users who want to program images, animation, and interactions. It has a visual context and serve as a software sketchbook and professional production tool. Processing is a project initiated by Ben Fry and Casey Reas, at the MIT Media Lab (www.processing.org). The second is an Open Source electronics prototyping platform based on flexible, easy-to-use hardware and software. Arduino has a microcontroller (programmed with Processing language) which can sense the environment by receiving input from a variety of sensors and can affect its surroundings by controlling lights, motors, and other actuators (www.arduino.cc). Both environments shared a growing community of people working in related projects and extending useful assistance for beginners. In this paper it is presented the current state of the pilot course and some of the initials results collected during the process. Students and teacher’s debates and evaluations of the experience have been exposed. Together with a critical evaluation in relation to the accomplishment of the effort of place together different disciplines in one collaborative project akin, architecture, design, programming and electronic. Finally, futures modifications of the course are discussed, together with consideration to take in account at the moment of bring Open Source and programming culture into the student curriculum.
keywords Physical computing, teaching framework, Open Source, Interactive Installation
series SIGRADI
email fili_pax@yahoo.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 48a7
authors Brooks
year 1999
title What's Real About Virtual Reality
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, Vol. 19, no. 6, Nov/Dec, 27
summary As is usual with infant technologies, the realization of the early dreams for VR and harnessing it to real work has taken longer than the wild hype predicted, but it is now happening. I assess the current state of the art, addressing the perennial questions of technology and applications. By 1994, one could honestly say that VR "almost works." Many workers at many centers could doe quite exciting demos. Nevertheless, the enabling technologies had limitations that seriously impeded building VR systems for any real work except entertainment and vehicle simulators. Some of the worst problems were end-to-end system latencies, low-resolution head-mounted displays, limited tracker range and accuracy, and costs. The technologies have made great strides. Today one can get satisfying VR experiences with commercial off-the-shelf equipment. Moreover, technical advances have been accompanied by dropping costs, so it is both technically and economically feasible to do significant application. VR really works. That is not to say that all the technological problems and limitations have been solved. VR technology today "barely works." Nevertheless, coming over the mountain pass from "almost works" to "barely works" is a major transition for the discipline. I have sought out applications that are now in daily productive use, in order to find out exactly what is real. Separating these from prototype systems and feasibility demos is not always easy. People doing daily production applications have been forthcoming about lessons learned and surprises encountered. As one would expect, the initial production applications are those offering high value over alternate approaches. These applications fall into a few classes. I estimate that there are about a hundred installations in daily productive use worldwide.
series journal paper
email brooks@ai.mit.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id caadria2003_a1-2
id caadria2003_a1-2
authors Bunyavipakul, Monchai and Charoensilp, Ekasidh
year 2003
title Designing the Virtual Design Studio System for Collaborative Work on Pda Collaborative Works Anytime, Anywhere
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 43-54
summary This research presents the collaboration in the VDS system through a microcomputer technology- a PDA (Personal Digital Assistants). Architect can collaborate anytime anyplace via VDS, a substitution to an old system that requires a specific location to work on. This research has studied and analyzed the format and the limitation of collaboration between PDA and Personal Computer, the wireless communication technology, and the Web Service technology, which enable different devices to share information through the Internet Network. The work process and the studied information have been used to develop a Web Application, a collaboration tool for a team of architect and designer. This Web Application has been tested in a renovation project, a clubhouse for a scuba diving place The objective of this research is to become a guideline of collaboration in architectural design work through Smart Object in order to serve the coming Ubiquitous era (Weiser, 1998)
series CAADRIA
email Tony_caad@hotmail.com
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id 44b3
authors Cajati, Claudio
year 1989
title Towards A KB System / Image-Databases - Integrated Interface: A Tool For Architectural Education
source CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4] Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989, pp. 9.9.1-9.9.7
summary Focusing on the tasks of university architectural education, a special stress is first laid on the possibility of going beyond some limits of traditional CAAD. as coming out from the recent debate, and on the opportunities offered by knowledge based systems as metadesign supports in architectural domains. Particularly, with regard to image-databases, their importance for explaining and exemplifying the knowledge representation in KB Systems, and their integration via intelligent interface are discussed. At last, some possible uses of the whole as an educational tool in the daily university training are proposed.
keywords Architectural Education, KB System, Image-database, Interface
series eCAADe
email cajatic@libero.it
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id 89d9
authors Cajati, Claudio
year 1992
title The New Teaching of an Architect: The Rôle of Expert Systems in Technological Culture
source CAAD Instruction: The New Teaching of an Architect? [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Barcelona (Spain) 12-14 November 1992, pp. 435-442
summary We already have the EEC, that is the European Economic Community. We have to build the CCE, that is the Common Cultural Europe. Architects and building engineers of any european country will be allowed to freely practise in any other country of the EEC. Of course, it is not only matter of coming down of the frontiers, of a greater labour mobility. Not even it will be enough that the university degree courses of the different countries agree to and put into effect the EEC common directives. They need rules and guidelines entering into the merits of practice: rules and guidelines which, rather than a legal and bureaucratic matter, must be the result of a common cultural and technical work, about clear and delimited questions of shared subjects, in which all the community countries be deeply concerned. Analogously, in the very field of research, the project "Human Capital and Mobility" has in view a greater european scientific and technological competitiveness, through an integration of human and material resources of different research centres, such as in shared-cost research projects and in concerted research actions. Such an integration is neither easy nor rapid. The political, social, cultural, technological peculiarities of the countries of the European Community certainly constitute an obstacle for the creation of a supernational cultural and technological pool. of common opportunities. These peculiarities, however, aren't only a restraint for the european community effort of unification and construction of shared goals, constraints, rules, methods, techniques, tools. They mean also a richness, an unrepeatable resourse: they are the result of a historical millenary stratification, which gave rise to urban and architectural contexts, to cultural and technological traditions it would be a serious mistake to waste.
series eCAADe
email cajatic@libero.it
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id c434
authors Colajanni, B., Pellitteri, G. and Scianna, A.
year 1992
title Two Approaches to Teaching Computers in Architecture: The Experience in the Faculty of Engineering in Palermo, Italy
source CAAD Instruction: The New Teaching of an Architect? [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Barcelona (Spain) 12-14 November 1992, pp. 295-306
summary Teaching the use of computers in architecture poses the same kind of problems as teaching mathematics. To both there are two possible approaches. The first presents the discipline as a tool of which the merely instrumental aspect is emphasized. Teaching is limited to show the results obtainable by existing programs and how to get them. The second approach, on the contrary emphasizes the autonomous nature of the discipline, mathematics as much as computing, on the basis of the convincement that the maximum of instrumental usefulness can be obtained through the knowledge at the highest degree of generality and, then, of abstraction. The first approach changes little in the mind of the student. He simply learns that is possible, and then worthy doing, a certain amount of operations, mainly checks of performances (and not only the control of the aspect, now easy with one of the many existing CAD) or searches of technical informations in some database. The second approach gives the student the consciousness of the manageability of abstract structures of relationships. He acquires then the idea of creating by himself particular structures of relationships and managing them. This can modify the very idea of the design procedure giving the student the consciousness that he can intervene directly in every segment of the design procedure, reshaping it to some extent in a way better suited to the particular problem he is dealing with. Of course this second approach implies learning not only a language but also the capability of coming to terms with languages. And again it is a cultural acquisition that can be very useful when referred to the languages of architecture. Furthermore the capability of simulating on the computer also a small segment of the design process gives the student a better understanding both of the particular problem he is dealing with and of the very nature of design. As for the first effect, it happens whenever a translation is done from a language to another one. One is obliged to get to the core of the matter in order to overcome the difficulties rising from the different bias of the two languages. The second effect comes from the necessity of placing the studied segment in the general flow of the design process. The organisation in a linear sequence of action to be accomplished recursively in an order always varying in any design occasion is an extremely useful exercise to understand the signification and the techniques of formalisation of design problems.
series eCAADe
email bcolajan@mbox.unipa.it
last changed 1998/08/18 14:26

_id 5a48
authors Combes, L. and Bellomio, A.
year 1999
title Creativity and Modularity in Architecture
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 169-179
summary The Modern Movement in Architecture put forward industrialization, mass production and standardization among its most important banners. At the end of the century those principles are partially applied. However, the overwhelming growing of exchanges and the purchase of artifacts coming from all over the world to be assembled in order to create new artifacts, determines that in the short span, a world wide standardization becomes unavoidable. Designers should be aware about this imminent issue. Working with standard objects means modular thinking. If modules are conceived as sort of constraining entities framing the mind, creative thinking is facing a gloomy prospect. Creativity and freedom seem to be jeopardized by ready made objects. In fact, from the beginning of design as a form- giving activity it exists a dialectic between creativity and feasibility. It is not surprising since designing is essentially the transformation of ideas into real world objects. Nonetheless, the increasing standardization and the indispensable use of computers are exasperating that dialectics. In this paper is argued that if the characteristics of modular procedures are used in the early stage of the design process to prompt the form for further adjustment, creative thinking is released from excessive awareness about dimensional constraints. The first part of the paper is devoted to the description of the contextural trends that make modular thinking relevant. In the second part some propositions about the use of computer systems to generate "modular freedom" are exposed together with examples illustrating the proposed process.
series AVOCAAD
email labsist@herrera.unt.edu.ar
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

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