CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 102

_id caadria2019_660
id caadria2019_660
authors Aghaei Meibodi, Mania, Giesecke, Rena and Dillenburger, Benjamin
year 2019
title 3D Printing Sand Molds for Casting Bespoke Metal Connections - Digital Metal: Additive Manufacturing for Cast Metal Joints in Architecture
source M. Haeusler, M. A. Schnabel, T. Fukuda (eds.), Intelligent & Informed - Proceedings of the 24th CAADRIA Conference - Volume 1, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand, 15-18 April 2019, pp. 133-142
summary Metal joints play a relevant role in space frame constructions, being responsible for large amount of the overall material and fabrication cost. Space frames which are constructed with standardized metal joints are constrained to repetitive structures and topologies. For customized space frames, the fabrication of individual metal joints still remains a challenge. Traditional fabrication methods such as sand casting are labour intensive, while direct 3D metal printing is too expensive and slow for the large volumes needed in architecture.This research investigates the use of Binder Jetting technology to 3D print sand molds for casting bespoke metal joints in architecture. Using this approach, a large number of custom metal joints can be fabricated economically in short time. By automating the generation of the joint geometry and the corresponding mold system, an efficient digital process chain from design to fabrication is established. Several design studies for cast metal joints are presented. The approach is successfully tested on the example of a full scale space frame structure incorporating almost two hundred custom aluminum joints.
keywords 3D printing; binder jetting; sand casting; metal joints; metal casting; space frame; digital fabrication; computational design; lightweight; customization
series CAADRIA
email mania.meibodi@gmail.com
last changed 2019/04/16 08:26

_id sigradi2016_615
id sigradi2016_615
authors Almeida , Rafael Goffinet de; Santos, Fábio Lopes Souza
year 2016
title Um olhar sobre a relação entre sujeitos e meios técnicos: O público como construção social mediada [Looking at the relationship between subjects and technical means: The audience as mediated social construction]
source SIGraDi 2016 [Proceedings of the 20th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-956-7051-86-1] Argentina, Buenos Aires 9 - 11 November 2016, pp.872-879
summary This article analyses some of the proposals produced in the late 1970´s by the American contemporary artist Dan Graham, in which he uses technical means to investigate the audience´s perception and behavior. The questions raised highlight reciprocity phenomena and identity constructions – factors that affect our experience and behavior in contemporary cities daily life. All of these issues derive from Graham´s investigations of the main information and communication technologies (media) produced at that time, and which continue to offer reflections on current relationship between technical means and the subject – that is, his/her condition as audience, observer, spectator or user.
keywords Dan Graham; Contemporary art; Contemporary Architecture and City; Technical means; Contemporary spatiality
series other
type normal paper
email rafael.goffinet.almeida@usp.br
last changed 2017/06/21 12:49

_id 8c2d
authors Alvarado, Rodrigo García
year 2001
title PROJECTED SPACE: CHARACTERIZING THE “CYBRID ARCHITECTURE”.
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 285-287
summary The “cybrid architecture” has been defined like integration of physical and digital spaces. Based on the capability of electronic media to generate virtual environments (cyberspaces) which could be related to buildings. However, theoretical studies and contemporary works reveal a more complex relationship between media and constructions. Expressed in architectural characteristics that constitutes a new spatial quality, named here projected space. Hence the paper argues that “cybrid architecture” is not technological, but is a modification of conventional architectural space due to cultural evolution.
series SIGRADI
email rgarcia@ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2005_673
id sigradi2005_673
authors Amorim, Arivaldo Leão de; Daniel Chudak
year 2005
title Digital Historic Heritage: documenting of Pelourinho, Salvador - Bahia, Brazil, with 3D laser scanning technology
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 673-678
summary This paper describes the Pelourinho Project realized past July in Salvador, during the 1st International Conference on 3D Laser Scanning for Heritage Documentation. The Pelourinho located at the historic center of Salvador, is an impressive wide set of buildings listed by UNESCO as World Heritage. The text contains a quickly overview about the 3D laser scanning technology, shows how data are captured and what they stored and what they means. The 3D laser scanning model, another kind of 3D geometric model is called point cloud and represents an excellent way to store data of some particular constructions. Because its irregular shapes it is very arduous to survey and represent these constructions by any other method. The point cloud model is an excellent way to represent with integrity and accuracy these particular complex shapes like the colonial baroque churches in Brazil. [Full paper in Portuguese]
series SIGRADI
email alamorim@ufba.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ecaade2016_017
id ecaade2016_017
authors Androutsopoulou, Eirini
year 2016
title Autopoietic Features of the Urban Body's Elements - Similarity studies on network elements' attributes
source Herneoja, Aulikki; Toni Österlund and Piia Markkanen (eds.), Complexity & Simplicity - Proceedings of the 34th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland, 22-26 August 2016, pp. 71-78
summary The methodology presented in this paper is grounded on the analysis and relational relocation of attributes of the urban body, deriving from the reconstruction of the urban body as a network configuration. In contrast to the hierarchical constructions, network constructions allow for multiple connections between elements, therefore being closer to the complexity of the associative forces found in the structure of the urban body.Similarity function is applied in an attempt to restructure those attributes of the urban body which emerge from the position of each element (node) in relation to other elements of the network and not from the Cartesian topology. Being able to represent material elements as nodes, counter-bodies deriving from autopoietic -network functions emerge, allowing for an inquiry in what concerns the autopoietic features of the urban body in general, focusing on the application of autopoietic functions which generate the urban body parts and components and on the multiplicity of elements' structure, in terms of association of crowds of elements and sets of attributes' values, aiming at the redefinition of proximity as similarity and of remoteness as difference.
wos WOS:000402064400006
keywords Similarity; Autopoiesis; urban body; Attributes; network; complex systems
series eCAADe
email iandroutsopoulou@gmail.com
last changed 2017/06/28 08:46

_id sigradi2004_047
id sigradi2004_047
authors Antonio Almagro Gorbea; Ana Almagro Vidal; José Antonio Fernández Ruiz; Miguel González Garrido
year 2004
title Madinat al-zahraí: Investigación y representación [Madinat al-Zahraí: Investigation and Representation]
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary The virtual reconstruction of the archeological site of Madinat al-Zahra. in Córdoba (Spain) has permitted a new approach to the study and comprehension of this palatine city as well as to the typologies of Islamic architecture in Al-Andalus during the 10th century. Starting from fieldwork and from a photogrammetric survey of the site, the digital model has become a highly qualified tool in the research process. Through virtual navigation, it allows to learn new aspects about spatial configuration of this characteristic constructions that configure the basis for the development of further architectures during the following centuries. Furthermore, being conscious that knowledge is basic for cultural heritage preservation, this 3D reconstruction model is an important instrument for general dissemination and for implementing a visit to this significant case of Islamic architecture in Spain.
keywords Islamic architecture, computer graphics, virtual reconstruction, 3D modeling
series SIGRADI
email aalmagro@cica.es, almagro@csic.it, afruiz@ugr.es, miguelgg26@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ascaad2006_paper15
id ascaad2006_paper15
authors Anz, Craig and Akel Ismail Kahera
year 2006
title Critical Environmentalism and the Practice of Re-Construction
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This research focuses on the implications and applications of “critical environmentalism” as a quintessential epistemological framework for urban interventions while implementing digital applications that foster collective, round-table approaches to design. Essentially centering the environment (Umwelt) as an encompassing and interconnecting catalyst between multiple disciplines, philosophies, and modes of inquiry and technologies, the framework reciprocally fosters individual and critical identities associated with particular places, belief systems, and their participants as a primary concern. Critical environmentalism promotes a comprehensive, reciprocally unifying epistemological framework that can significantly inform architectural interventions and the tethered use of its technologies in order to foster increased vitality and a certain coinvested attention to the complexities of the greater domain. Grounding the theory in pedagogical practice, this paper documents an approach to urban design and architectural education, implemented as a case-study and design scenario, where divergent perspectives amalgamate into emergent urban configurations, critically rooted in the conditional partialities of place. Digital technologies are incorporated along with analogical methods as tools to integrate multiple perspectives into a single, working plane. Engaging the above framework, the approach fosters a critical (re)construction and on-going, co-vested regeneration of community and the context of place while attempting to dialogically converge multiple urban conditions and modes-of-thought through the co-application of various digital technologies. Critically understanding complex urban situations involves dialogically analyzing, mapping, and modeling a discursive, categorical structure through a common goal and rationale that seeks dialectic synthesis between divergent constructions while forming mutual, catalyzing impetuses between varying facets. In essence, the integration of varying technologies in conjunction, connected to real world scenarios and a guiding epistemic framework cultivates effective cross-pollination of ideas and modes through communicative and participatory interaction. As such it also provides greater ease in crosschecking between a multitude of divergent modes playing upon urban design and community development. Since current digital technologies aid in data collection and the synthesis of information, varying factors can be more easily and collectively identified, analyzed, and then simultaneously used in subsequent design configurations. It inherently fosters the not fully realized potential to collectively overlay or montage complex patterns and thoughts seamlessly and to thus subsequently merge a multitude of corresponding design configurations simultaneously within an ongoing, usable database. As a result, the pedagogical process reveals richly textured sociocultural fabrics and thus produces distinct amplifications in complexity and attentive management of diverse issues, while also generating significant narratives and themes for fostering creative and integrative solutions. As a model for urban community and social development, critical environmentalism is further supported the integrative use of digital technologies as an effective means and management for essential, communicative interchange of knowledge and thus rapprochement between divergent modes-of-thought, promoting critical, productive interaction with others in the (co)constructive processes of our life-space.
series ASCAAD
email canz@siu.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia06_230
id acadia06_230
authors Anzalone, Phillip
year 2006
title Synthetic Research
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 230-231
summary Synthetic Research insinuates a relationship of a meticulous process of discovering truth contradicted against a fabricated, as in concocted, reality. It is important to recognize the logical aspect of synthetic when examining what synthetic research can provide for architectural discourse. Synthesis contrasts with analysis in that it’s primary methods involve recourse to experience; it is experience that is at the heart of synthetic research. The synthesis of theory, architectural constructions, technological artifacts and computational techniques requires experiencing the results of experimentation. Synthetic digital architecture necessitates a discovery process incorporating creation that allows for experience, be it virtual reality, full-scale prototyping or spatial creations; provided experience is a truthful one, and not disingenuous and thereby slipping into the alternate definition of synthetic.Research’s experimental arm, as opposed to the analytic, relies on tinkering - implying the unfinished, the incomplete, the prototype. Examples of this are everywhere. Computer screenshots are a strikingly literal example of synthetic research when used as a means of experiencing a process. Performance mock-ups of building assemblies are a method of synthetic research in that one experiences a set of defined performances in order to discover and redefine the project. The watchmaker craft is an exercise in research/experimentation where material properties are inherent in function and aesthetics; consider how the components interact with the environment - motion, gravity, space-time, temperature. Efficiency at this point is predominantly structural and physical. Decorative or aesthetic elements are applied or integrated in later iterations along with optimization of performance, marketing and costs.What is a architectural research? How can research synthesize the wide range of possibilities for the trajectory of architecture when engaged in digital and computational techniques? The goals, techniques, documentation and other methods of research production have a place in architecture that must be explored, particularly as it related to computation. As in other fields, we must build a legitimate body of research whereby others can use and expand upon, such that digital architectures evolve in innovative as well as prosperous paths.
series ACADIA
email phil@abc-architects.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id sigradi2006_p034e
id sigradi2006_p034e
authors Araujo Pires, Julie and Murad, Carlos
year 2006
title Inscrições hipertextuais: a escrita como imagem na criação visual contemporânea [Hypertext inscription: writing as image in contemporary visual creation]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 411-414
summary This paper discusses the creative imagination by the speech’s presence on the contemporary projects of art/design. Nowadays the digital era has shattered limits of the space and the user’s perception in a mix between images and texts, built by numeric language, witnessing possible new ways of writing as image. Considering on the duality between verbal and visual, some post-modern artists/projectors are redeeming the germinal quality of image from the alphabet. They use video and electronic technology incorporating the word written in their creation process. In this sense, Gaston Bachelard’s ideas on the philosophy of image and imagination could be helpful to understand that process. At first, looking through the representations accomplished by the artists gesture in their constructions. Afterwards, how those visual poetics explore the word on video project and electronic way as experimentation and on the creation project process.
series SIGRADI
email julieap@terra.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ecaade2012_280
id ecaade2012_280
authors Baerlecken, Daniel; Reitz, Judith; Duncan, David
year 2012
title Junk: Reuse of Waste Materials
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 143-150
summary The paper presents a series of design build studio that investigate the role of waste as building material. The series develops proposals for constructions that use CAAD and CAM tools in combination with traditional fabrication tools to design and build an installation out of waste materials. The fi rst construction uses waste to create two installations that questions human consumption, The second project is a future project, that intends the use of waste as an actual building material. Recycling is in the process of becoming an integral part of sustainable architecture. However, there are very few digital design projects that use re-used or recycled materials in combination with their architectural and aesthetic qualities and potentials. The potential of such an investigation is explored within these design build studios. What is junk? What is a building material? What are the aesthetics of junk?
wos WOS:000330320600014
keywords Education in CAAD; digital fabrication and construction; practice-based and interdisciplinary CAAD; parametric modeling
series eCAADe
email Daniel.Baerlecken@coa.gatech.edu
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

_id 22d6
authors Ballheim, F. and Leppert, J.
year 1991
title Architecture with Machines, Principles and Examples of CAAD-Education at the Technische Universität München
source Experiences with CAAD in Education and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Munich (Germany) 17-19 October 1991
summary "Design tools affect the results of the design process" - this is the starting point of our considerations about the efficient use of CAAD within architecture. To give you a short overview about what we want to say with this thesis lets have a short - an surely incomplete - trip through the fourth dimension back into the early time of civil engineering. As CAD in our faculty is integrated in the "Lehrstuhl für Hochbaustatik und Tragwerksplanung" (if we try to say it in English it would approximately be "institute of structural design"), we chose an example we are very familiar with because of its mathematical background - the cone sections: Circle, ellipse, parabola and hyperbola. If we start our trip two thousand years ago we only find the circle - or in very few cases the ellipse - in their use for the ground plan of greek or roman theaters - if you think of Greek amphitheaters or the Colosseum in Rome - or for the design of the cross section of a building - for example the Pantheon, roman aqueducts or bridges. With the rediscovery of the perspective during the Renaissance the handling of the ellipse was brought to perfection. May be the most famous example is the Capitol in Rome designed by Michelangelo Buonarotti with its elliptical ground plan that looks like a circle if the visitor comes up the famous stairway. During the following centuries - caused by the further development of the natural sciences and the use of new construction materials, i.e. cast-iron, steel or concrete - new design ideas could be realized. With the growing influence of mathematics on the design of buildings we got the division into two professions: Civil engineering and architecture. To the regret of the architects the most innovative constructions were designed by civil engineers, e.g. the early iron bridges in Britain or the famous bridges of Robert Maillard. Nowadays we are in the situation that we try to reintegrate the divided professions. We will return to that point later discussing possible solutions of this problem. But let us continue our 'historical survey demonstrating the state of the art we have today. As the logical consequence of the parabolic and hyperbolic arcs the hyperbolic parabolic shells were developed using traditional design techniques like models and orthogonal sections. Now we reach the point where the question comes up whether complex structures can be completely described by using traditional methods. A question that can be answered by "no" if we take the final step to the completely irregular geometry of cable- net-constructions or deconstructivistic designs. What we see - and what seems to support our thesis of the connection between design tools and the results of the design process - is, that on the one hand new tools enabled the designer to realize new ideas and on the other hand new ideas affected the development of new tools to realize them.

series eCAADe
more http://www.mediatecture.at/ecaade/91/ballheim_leppert.pdf
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 4cf2
authors Barsky, Brian A.
year 1990
title Geometric Continuity of Parametric Curves : Constructions of Geometrically Continuous Splines
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications. January, 1990. vol. 10: pp. 60-68 : ill
summary This article is part two of an article published in November 1989. In the first article theoretical foundations for geometric continuity were presented. In this article the basic theory was applied to the construction of geometrically continuous spline curves
keywords Bezier, curves, curved surfaces, splines, continuity, computational geometry, computer graphics
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id acadia14_453
id acadia14_453
authors Bell, Brad; Read, T. Cord; Ede, Austin; Barnes, Nathan
year 2014
title Casting non-repetitive Geometries with Digitally Reconfigurable Surfaces
source ACADIA 14: Design Agency [Proceedings of the 34th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 9781926724478]Los Angeles 23-25 October, 2014), pp. 453-462
summary The research is a digitally reconfigurable formwork, controlled by Arduinos and stepper motors, capable of producing a wide range of geometric outcomes for largel-scale panel prototypes using concrete or composite materials.
keywords Reconfigurable Molds, Panelized Surfaces, Precast Concrete, Digital Fabrication and Constructions, 3D Printing, Arduinos, Material Logics and Tectonics
series ACADIA
type Normal Paper
email bbell@uta.edu
last changed 2014/09/29 05:51

_id ecaade2017_234
id ecaade2017_234
authors Benetti, Alberto, Favargiotti, Sara and Ricci, Mos?
year 2017
title RE.S.U.ME. - REsilient and Smart Urban MEtabolism
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 1113-1120
summary New technologies and uncontrolled open-data policies lead public to a new way of approaching the built environment. To enlarge the competences of the professionals that work within the cities, we believe that providing a deep and dynamic knowledge on the heritage and urban built environment is the more effective solution to offer a unique support to the needs. By providing a boosted geographical database with detailed information about the status of each building, we aim to support the professional by providing a neat vision about vacant buildings available citywide. We think this knowledge is an important asset in covering every kind of public requests: from flat to rent to an abandoned building to restore or to drive better investors. The city of Trento will be the pilot project to test these statements.We studied the phenomenon of pushing new constructions rather investing on the reuse of abandoned buildings with the consequences of unsustainable land use. To address the work we adopted a comprehensive approach across the fields of urbanism, ICT engineering and social sciences. We believe that sharing knowledge and know-hows with municipalities, agencies, and citizens is the way to support better market strategies as well as urban transformation policies.
keywords Information Technology; Urban Metabolism; Re-cycle; Urban Reserves; Policy Decision-Making; Data-driven Analysis
series eCAADe
email sara.favargiotti@unitn.it
last changed 2017/09/13 13:13

_id 4e1c
authors Berdinski, D.
year 1997
title Combining different kinds of perspective images in architectural practice.
source Architectural and Urban Simulation Techniques in Research and Education [Proceedings of the 3rd European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 90-407-1669-2]
summary This paper is about combining photo-, video-, endoscope captured images with handmade or computer generated ones. Practically all optical systems are known to produce more or less curved perspective (spherical or cylindrical) which depends of angle-of-view, and a computer as a rule (as handmade) constructs linear perspective images. To combine them on any media correctly, an operator has to be professional painter or designer, because there is no mathematically determined way to combine them. The author's-made demo-computer program is able to generate spherical perspective of simple spatial constructions. It allows to illustrate mathematically and visually the principles of optical curved perspective, laws of their combination with linear ones and helps to feel how to achieve the accordance with natural visual architectural images.
keywords Architectural Endoscopy, Endoscopy, Simulation, Visualisation, Visualization, Real Environments
series EAEA
email bvl@icp.ac.ru
more http://www.bk.tudelft.nl/media/eaea/eaea97.html
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id c57b
authors Bier, Eric A.
year 1988
title Snap-Dragging. Interactive Geometric design in Two and Three Dimensions
source University of California, Berkeley
summary Graphic artists, mechanical designers, architects, animators, authors of technical papers and others create geometric designs (illustrations and solid models) as a major part of their daily efforts. Some part of this shape construction must be done with precision. For instance, certain line segments should be horizontal, parallel or congruent. In recent years, interactive computer programs have been used to speed up the production of precise geometric designs. These programs take advantage of high-speed graphics, equation solving, and computer input peripherals to reduce the time needed to describe point positions to the machine. Previous techniques include rounding the cursor to points on a rectangular grid, solving networks of constraints, and supporting step-by-step drafting-style constructions. Snap-dragging is a modification of the drafting approach that takes advantage of powerful workstations to reduce the time needed to make precise illustrations. Using a single gravity mapping, a cursor can be snapped to either points, lines or surface. The gravity algorithm achieves good performance by computing intersection points on the fly. To aid precise construction, a set of lines, circles, planes, and spheres, called alignment objects, are constructed by the system at a set of slopes, angles, and distances specified by the user. These alignments objects are constructed at each vertex or edge that the user has declared to be hot (of interest). Vertices and edges can also be made hot by the system through the action of an automatic hotness rule. When snap-dragging is used, shapes can often be constructed using a few more keystrokes than would be needed to sketch them freehand. Objects can be edited at arbitrary orientations and sizes. The number of primitive operations is small, making it possible to provide keyboard combinations for quickly activating most of these operations. The user interface works nearly identically in two or three dimensions. In three dimensions, snap-dragging works with a two-dimensional pointing device in a single perspective view.  
series thesis:PhD
email bier@parc.com
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 4
authors Bollinger, Elizabeth and Alvarado, Rodrigo Garcia
year 1998
title Archetypes as Precedent of Virtual Architectures
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 32-35
summary Archetypes are psychological concepts described by the renowned Swiss psychologist Cari Jung. It is possible identify archetypal forms in eminent buildings of different regions and ages, recognizing archetypes as a multi-cultural liaison for various architectures. These concepts function as basic precedents of spatial design in different geographical and historical contexts. The emerging digital culture is establishing a plethora of virtual environments, through web-pages of the Internet, global TV, multimedia CD, video games and immersive devices. These virtual environments offer electronic activities and tools for architectural practice. In both senses, virtual architectures conforms to the visual and spatial characteristics of technologies. Thus, electronic capabilities establish digital habitats and references to contemporary architecture. Since virtual architectures are immaterial constructions, perceptual properties guide the spatial and formal design. In that sense, archetypes allow a basic vocabulary for the design of virtual architectures, linking them to cultural history and giving them a human orientation.
series SIGRADI
email rgarcia@pegasus.dci.ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ijac20108206
id ijac20108206
authors Bravo, Germán; Rafael Villazón, Augusto Trujillo, Mauricio Caviedes
year 2010
title Authoring Tools for KOC - Concepts and Pedagogical Use
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 8 - no. 2, 183-200
summary One of the main problems of teachers aiming to teach the construction techniques used in to build a building is the lack of practical examples to show to their students. In order to be useful, these examples must come from real projects or even better the teachers may take their students to constructions sites, but this latter option is not always available and may be dangerous. To deal with this problem, Los Andes University has committed the construction of a knowledge repository containing information gathered from real projects and semantically described, in order to provide easy access to its content and in the language of people of construction. This project is called KOC, standing for Knowledge Objects of Construction, which uses an ontology to describe semantically the data contained in the repository. Being the pedagogical objective of the project, it is important to provide the teachers with additional tools to generate new knowledge objects, based on existing knowledge objects in the repository. This paper presents three composition tools for KOC: a complex objects composer issued from structured searches, a constructive processes composer and a case study composer, all of them aiming the improvement of learning quality in the technical area of building construction at the architecture and engineering schools. The paper also shows some examples of knowledge objects and how KOC is been used in the courses of the Architecture Department of Los Andes.
series journal
last changed 2019/05/24 07:55

_id ecaadesigradi2019_381
id ecaadesigradi2019_381
authors Buš, Peter
year 2019
title Large-scale Prototyping Utilising Technologies and Participation - On-demand and Crowd-driven Urban Scenarios
source Sousa, JP, Xavier, JP and Castro Henriques, G (eds.), Architecture in the Age of the 4th Industrial Revolution - Proceedings of the 37th eCAADe and 23rd SIGraDi Conference - Volume 2, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal, 11-13 September 2019, pp. 847-854
summary The paper theorises and elaborates the idea of crowd-driven assemblies for flexible and adaptive constructions utilising automatic technologies and participatory activities within the context of twenty-first century cities. As economic and technological movements and shifts in society and cultures are present and ongoing, the building technology needs to incorporate human inputs following the aspects of customisation to build adaptive architectural and urban scenarios based on immediate decisions made according to local conditions or specific spatial demands. In particular, the paper focuses on large-scale prototyping for urban applications along with on-site interactions between humans and automatic building technologies to create on-demand spatial scenarios. It discusses the current precedents in research and practice and speculates future directions to be taken in creation, development or customisation of contemporary and future cities based on participatory and crowd-driven building activities. The main aim of this theoretical overview is to offer a more comprehensive understanding of the relations between technology and humans in the context of reactive and responsive built environments.
keywords large-scale urban prototyping; on-site participation; human-machine interaction; intelligent cities; responsive cities; urban autopoiesis
series eCAADeSIGraDi
email p.bus@kent.ac.uk
last changed 2019/08/26 20:28

_id cf2011_p135
id cf2011_p135
authors Chen Rui, Irene; Schnabel Marc Aurel
year 2011
title Multi-touch - the future of design interaction
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 557-572.
summary The next major revolution for design is to bring the natural user interaction into design activities. Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) brought a new approach that was more effective compared to their conventional predecessors. In recent years, Natural User Interfaces (NUI) have advanced user experiences and multi-touch and gesture technologies provide new opportunities for a variety of potential uses in design. Much attention has been paid to leverage in the design of interactive interfaces. The mouse input and desktop screen metaphors limit the information sharing for multiple users and also delayed the direct interaction for communication between each other. This paper proposes the innovative method by integrating game engine ‘Unity3D’ with multi-touch tangible interfaces. Unity3D provides a game development tool as part of its application package that has been designed to let users to focus on creating new games. However, it does not limit the usage of area to design additional game scenarios since the benefits of Unity3D is allowing users to build 3D environments with its customizable and easy to use editor, graphical pipelines to openGL (http://unity3d.com/, 2010 ). It creates Virtual Reality (VR) environments which can simulates places in the real world, as well as the virtual environments helping architects and designers to vividly represent their design concepts through 3D visualizations, and interactive media installations in a detailed multi-sensory experience. Stereoscopic displays advanced their spatial ability while solving issues to design e.g. urban spaces. The paper presents how a multi-touch tabletop can be used for these design collaboration and communication tasks. By using natural gestures, designers can now communicate and share their ideas by manipulating the same reference simultaneously using their own input simultaneously. Further studies showed that 3Dl forms are perceived and understood more readily through haptic and proprioceptive perception of tangible representations than through visual representation alone (Gillet et al, 2005). Based on the authors’ framework presented at the last CAADFutures, the benefits of integrating 3D visualization and tactile sensory can be illustrated in this platform (Chen and Wang, 2009), For instance, more than one designer can manipulate the 3D geometry objects on tabletop directly and can communicate successfully their ideas freely without having to waiting for the next person response. It made the work more effective which increases the overall efficiency. Designers can also collect the real-time data by any change they make instantly. The possibilities of Uniy3D make designing very flexible and fun, it is deeply engaging and expressive. Furthermore, the unity3D is revolutionizing the game development industry, its breakthrough development platform for creating highly interactive 3D content on the web (http://unity3d.com/ , 2010) or similar to the interface of modern multimedia devices such as the iPhone, therefore it allows the designers to work remotely in a collaborative way to integrate the design process by using the individual mobile devices while interacting design in a common platform. In design activities, people create an external representation of a domain, often of their own ideas and understanding. This platform helps learners to make their ideas concrete and explicit, and once externalized, subsequently they reflect upon their work how well it sits the real situation. The paper demonstrates how this tabletop innovatively replaces the typical desktop metaphor. In summary, the paper addresses two major issues through samples of collaborative design: firstly presenting aspects of learners’ interactions with physical objects, whereby tangible interfaces enables them constructing expressive representations passively (Marshall, 2007), while focussing on other tasks; and secondly showing how this novel design tool allows designers to actively create constructions that might not be possible with conventional media.
keywords Multi-touch tabletop, Tangible User Interface
series CAAD Futures
email rui.chen@sydney.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

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