CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 198

_id sigradi2018_1628
id sigradi2018_1628
authors Agirbas, Asli
year 2018
title The Use of Multi-Software in Undergraduate Architectural Design Studio Education: A Case Study
source SIGraDi 2018 [Proceedings of the 22nd Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISSN: 2318-6968] Brazil, São Carlos 7 - 9 November 2018, pp. 1059-1064
summary In the architectural design process, instead of using the computer programs effectively, the ability of choosing the most suitable program for the purpose takes place. However, different programs used in the design process serve different purposes. Therefore, the use of more than one program throughout the project design process arises. Every day the number of programs used increases rapidly. Hence, the designers find difficult to adapt this speed. The same applies to the students of architectural design studio course. Therefore, in this study with undergraduate architecture students, a pilot study focusing on the use of multi-software was conducted within the scope of architectural design studio. The process and outputs were evaluated.
keywords Use of multi-software; Contextual design; Architectural design education; CAAD
series SIGraDi
email asliagirbas@gmail.com
last changed 2019/05/20 09:14

_id c204
authors Aleksander Asanowicz
year 1996
title Teaching and Learning - Full Brainwash
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 51-54
summary We often speak of changes in design process due to an application of computers. But in my opinion we more often rather speak of lack of changes. Lets hope that some day we will be able to witness full integrity and compatibility of design process and tools applied in it. Quite possible such an integrity may occur in the cyberspace. Nevertheless before that could happen some changes within the teaching methods at faculties of architecture, where despite great numbers of computer equipment used, the students are still being taught as in the XIX century. In terms of achieved results it proves ineffective because application of chalk and blackboard only will always loose to new media, which allow visual perception of dinosaurs in Jurassic Park. Our civilisation is the iconographic one. And that is why teaching methods are about to change. An application of computer as simply a slide projector seems to be way too expensive. New media demands new process and new process demands new media. Lets hope that could be achieved in cyberspace as being a combination of: classic ways of teaching, hypertext, multimedia, virtual reality and a new teaching methodology (as used in Berlitz English School - full brainwash). At our faculty several years ago we experimentally undertook and applied an Integrated Design Teaching Method. A student during design process of an object simultaneously learnt all aspects and functions of the object being designing i.e.: its structure, piping and wiring, material cost and even historic evolution of its form and function. Unfortunately that concept was too extravagant as for the seventies in our reality. At present due to wide implementation of new media and tools in design process we come to consider reimplementation of IDTM again.
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id acadia19_490
id acadia19_490
authors Alvarez, Martín; Wagner, Hans Jakob; Groenewolt, Abel; Krieg, Oliver David; Kyjanek, Ondrej; Sonntag, Daniel; Bechert, Simon; Aldinger, Lotte; Menges, Achim; Knippers, Jan
year 2019
title The Buga Wood Pavilion
source ACADIA 19:UBIQUITY AND AUTONOMY [Proceedings of the 39th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-578-59179-7] (The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture, Austin, Texas 21-26 October, 2019) pp. 490-499
summary Platforms that integrate developments from multiple disciplines are becoming increasingly relevant as the complexity of different technologies increases day by day. In this context, this paper describes an integrative approach for the development of architectural projects. It portrays the benefits of applying such an approach by describing its implementation throughout the development and execution of a building demonstrator. Through increasing the agility and extending the scope of existing computational tools, multiple collaborators were empowered to generate innovative solutions across the different phases of the project´s cycle. For this purpose, novel solutions for planar segmented wood shells are showcased at different levels. First, it is demonstrated how the application of a sophisticated hollow-cassette building system allowed the optimization of material use, production time, and mounting logistics due to the modulation of the parameters of each construction element. Second, the paper discusses how the articulation of that complexity was crucial when negotiating between multiple professions, interacting with different contractors, and complying with corresponding norms. Finally, the innovative architectural features of the resulting building are described, and the accomplishments are benchmarked through comparison with typological predecessor.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email inmartrezalva@gmail.com
last changed 2019/12/18 08:03

_id e29d
authors Arvesen, Liv
year 1996
title LIGHT AS LANGUAGE
source Full-Scale Modeling in the Age of Virtual Reality [6th EFA-Conference Proceedings]
summary With the unlimited supply of electric light our surroundings very easily may be illuminated too strongly. Too much light is unpleasant for our eyes, and a high level of light in many cases disturbs the conception of form. Just as in a forest, we need shadows, contrasts and variation when we compose with light. If we focus on the term compose, it is natural to conceive our environment as a wholeness. In fact, this is not only aesthetically important, it is true in a physical context. Inspired by old windows several similar examples have been built in the Trondheim Full-scale Laboratory where depth is obtained by constructing shelves on each side of the opening. When daylight is fading, indirect artificial light from above gradually lightens the window. The opening is perceived as a space of light both during the day and when it is dark outside.

Another of the built examples at Trondheim University which will be presented, is a doctor's waitingroom. It is a case study of special interest because it often appears to be a neglected area. Let us start asking: What do we have in common when we are waiting to come in to a doctor? We are nervous and we feel sometimes miserable. Analysing the situation we understand the need for an interior that cares for our state of mind. The level of light is important in this situation. Light has to speak softly. Instead of the ordinary strong light in the middle of the ceiling, several spots are selected to lighten the small tables separating the seats. The separation is supposed to give a feeling of privacy. By the low row of reflected planes we experience an intimate and warming atmosphere in the room. A special place for children contributes to the total impression of calm. In this corner the inside of some shelves are lit by indirect light, an effect which puts emphasis on the small scale suitable for a child. And it also demonstrates the good results of variation. The light setting in this room shows how light is “caught” two different ways.

keywords Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa/
last changed 2004/05/04 12:34

_id 6480
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 1999
title Computer in Creation of Architectural Form
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999,pp. 131-142
summary This paper considers graphic methods of presentation of ideas 'in the creation of architectural forms' and evolution of these methods, determined by the implementations of information technology. Drawings have been the main medium of expression since Leonardo da Vinci to the present-day. Graphic communication has always been treated as a main design tool, both - at the ending stage of design and at the early design stage. Implementation of computers in design doe not change this situation. The entire design process proceeds in a traditional way. While searching for the idea we use hand sketches and, after this, technical drawings are draught on a plotter, which replaces a drawing pen. Using computers at the early design stages encounters serious difficulties. The main thesis of this paper is that hardware and software inadequacy is not the problem, the problem is in the inadequacy of the design methods. This problem is to be reconceived as what a person can do with a program, rather than what is the capacity of a program. Contemporary computer techniques allow us to put an equation mark between the searching for idea, visualisation and its realisation in virtual space. This paper presents Sketching by scanning - an experimental method of using computer hardware and software for stimulating of searching of architectural's form.
series AVOCAAD
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id caadria2016_013
id caadria2016_013
authors Aschwanden, Gideon D.P.A.
year 2016
title Neighbourhood detection with analytical tools
source Living Systems and Micro-Utopias: Towards Continuous Designing, Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2016) / Melbourne 30 March–2 April 2016, pp. 13-22
summary The increasing population size of cities makes the urban fabric ever more complex and more disintegrated into smaller areas, called neighbourhoods. This project applies methods from geoscience and software engineering to the process of identification of those neighbourhoods. Neighbourhoods, by nature, are defined by connec- tivity, centrality and similarity. Transport and geospatial datasets are used to detect the characteristics of places. An unsupervised learning algorithm is then applied to sort places according to their characteris- tics and detect areas with similar make up: the neighbourhood. The at- tributes can be static like land use or space syntax attributes as well as dynamic like transportation patterns over the course of a day. An un- supervised learning algorithm called Self Organizing Map is applied to project this high dimensional space constituting of places and their attributes to a two dimensional space where proximity is similarity and patterns can be detected – the neighbourhoods. To summarize, the proposed approach yields interesting insights into the structure of the urban fabric generated by human movement, interactions and the built environment. The approach represents a quantitative approach to ur- ban analysis. It reveals that the city is not a polychotomy of neigh- bourhoods but that neighbourhoods overlap and don’t have a sharp edge.
keywords Data analytics; urban; learning algorithms; neighbourhood delineation
series CAADRIA
email gideon.aschwanden@unimelb.edu.au
last changed 2016/03/11 09:21

_id 2005_163
id 2005_163
authors Balakrishnan, Bimal, Kalisperis, Loukas N. and Muramoto, Katsuhiko
year 2005
title Evaluating Workflow and Modeling Strategies of Pen Computing in the Beginning Architectural Design Studio
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 163-170
summary This paper investigates the impact of Tablet PCs on the workflow in an undergraduate design studio. We examined how well the students adapted the Tablet PC into their day-to-day design work and evaluated the appropriateness of the Tablet PC as a common digital tool used in an architectural design studio. This research involved observation of student behavior during the semester and the conducting of a survey measuring various aspects of the students’ use of the computers. A more specific goal was to compare the effectiveness of the pen versus the mouse as input devices for a three-dimensional modeling task in terms of both task time and strategies. Our assumption was that a change in input mode would affect the strategies and the performance. The results of a within-subjects, repeated-measures experiment carried out to elicit differences in input devices are discussed.
keywords Digital Design Education; Human-Computer Interaction; 3D Modeling; Pen Computing; Task Analysis
series eCAADe
email lnk@psu.edu
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id sigradi2010_298
id sigradi2010_298
authors Barcellos, Góes Mariza; David Maria Manuela
year 2010
title Visualization: The Contribution of a Mathematical Mediating Artefact for Creative Processes and Design Activities
source SIGraDi 2010_Proceedings of the 14th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, pp. Bogotá, Colombia, November 17-19, 2010, pp. 298-300
summary Considering mathematical knowledge as an artefact that mediates social activities in the world, this paper emphasizes the contribution of visual thinking to mathematics education and extends it to the learning of design activities, especially in architectural contexts. Results from a previous research paper on architectural design, which focused on the work of some contemporary architects in their day - to - day office activities, showed the relevance of drawing in architectural practice. These results aroused our interest in researching the mediating role of drawing and its structuring effects on creative processes and design activities in architecture.
keywords visualization, mathematics education, architectural design education, activity theory
series SIGRADI
email marizagoes@yahoo.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 56
authors Barron, Alicia and Chiarelli, Julia
year 1998
title Proyecto Para la Red de un Estudio de Arquitectura (Project for the Network of a Studio of Architecture)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 418-425
summary A consequence of the globalization on information processes in the way in which new technologies influence on design and production processes. There is no doubt that there is an increasingly and a big change in the areas of architecture design concerning to the operational and working methodology on graphic and alphanumeric information. Now a day it is not a far away Utopia, but a soon to come reality that architects interact in a virtual manner with their individual or institutional clients in their own country, as well as in foreign countries. Keeping these considerations in mind, we elaborated this Paper in order to present one of the existing criteria for the organization of graphic information jointly with its spatial relationship. The work presented herewith shows the development of an informatic net for an ideal mega-studio which in its professional and entrepreneurial profile covers tasks such as design, construction, graphic design and representation of foreign concerns. In the net design and in the selection of equipment for computing design area are covered all the variables at every instance.
series SIGRADI
email barron@ub.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 7798
authors Barrow, Larry
year 2002
title Elitism, IT and the Modern Architect Opportunity or Dilemma
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 97-109
summary Information Technology (IT) is impacting architecture dramatically in process and form. Often thecurrent transformation of architecture is difficult to analyze and frequently we see confusion and anxietyregarding uncertainties for the future of the architect as designer and project leader. The currentpotentiality for new exotic form (i.e. product) is mesmerizing; however, in the current context, lessobvious issues and pertinent questions are emerging for the profession. What is the mission of theprofession? What will keep us relevant in the mist of the new global society?In this paper, we will take an evolutionary perspective of technology in architecture and draw parallelsbetween the Renaissance, which is the genesis of the modern architect, and the contemporary state ofarchitecture. The modern architect was birthed during the Renaissance where we see the retraction ofthe architect from the building site and separation from direct involvement in the building process.Communications technology (i.e. representation in the form of free-hand drawings, mechanical 2Dorthographic drawings and 3D perspectives) enabled the decomposition of the master builder into threecomponents (i.e. artist-designer, practicing_architect, and builder). Thus, we see technology enable thedenigration and ultimate dissolution of the centuries old craftsman guilds and the master builder. Thetechnology evolution of “drawings” enabled monumental change in the process of architecture over thepast five hundred years. The fission of the master builder, enabled by “drawings”, resulted in disparatefactions which are the forerunners of the modern day litigious design-bid-build project delivery. We nowincreasingly see a return to the fusion of design and building where often the architect is not the projectmanager or leader. Thus, the question looms, will the 21st century architect lead or be led, and whatare the ramifications for the profession?The historical Master Builder is re-emerging as a dynamically networked team of design andconstruction knowledge specialists. Bi-lateral knowledge exchange, enhanced with emerging IT, isoccurring between owners, managers, architects, design specialists, engineers, builders and machines.Technology is disrupting architecture, resulting in increasing specialization and compressed timeframes, and may require reevaluation of the role of the architect as project-leader "integrativegeneralist"or "design-specialist".Conclusively, the concept of ‘cybernetic architecture’ is proposed as an IT reference framework. Failureto appropriately respond to societal evolution, driven by technology, could result in the loss ofprofessional status for the modern architect. Herein lies our dilemma, or opportunity, depending on therole choice of the modern architect.
series ACADIA
email lbarrow@msstate.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id c1f5
authors Blaszczyszyn, Maciej
year 2002
title Day-to-day Reality of Web-based Collaboration - Tools among European Architect Professionals
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 110-113
summary On behalf of phenomenal advantages of project extranet technology You can believe in improving communication among professionals in design and construction industry. But until now, the reality appears not as good. It is technological irony, as evidenced in below presented survey, that advanced solutions for a better collaboration may set up unbreakable barriers. Therefore knowledge of everyday reality in the field of webbased collaboration tools use is critical to all participants of this process, commercial as well academic ones. It is especially important to all European professionals, who are aware of consequences of extending in nearest future borders of European Union, the second biggest market in the world.
series eCAADe
email maciejb@arch.pw.edu.pl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 9b4d
authors Boerner, Wolfgang
year 2003
title The “Franziszeische Kataster” (land register) – Only a historial Map?
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary Franz I. of Austria that the legislative and technical hindrances were cleared away in order to commence with big changes. One cantruly say that it was due to his land tax patent from the 23rd of December 1817 that he founded the main land register of Austria andof the whole empire. The basic ideas of this patent are still valid today.This land register, named after it’s originator, was also said to be a “stabile” land register because the net profit rate, which wascrucial for the rating of taxation, was to be stabilized without giving consideration to higher productivity or diligence except to casesin which the fertility of the earth was destroyed by natural phenomenon.The land register was developed for the city of Vienna in the years 1819 to 1824. This land register of Vienna was scanned and digitized by the Urban Archaeology of Vienna. Since the launching of the “Kulturgüterkataster (Cultural Heritage Cadastre)“ in 1996, the individual municipal departments of the City of Vienna have developed a massive body of know-how regarding the various fields of interest. In particular, the inventoryingand evaluation of architectural objects as implemented by the City of Vienna could be easily adapted to other EU cities. It has alreadybeen suggested to initiate corresponding EU projects or participate in such.The long-time objective is an Internet portal. Based on the applications and competence developed in Vienna, the cultural assets of European metropolises could be digitised to present them in a novel forum. Lovers of culture, historians and urban planners would thus dispose of an instrument that renders urbanistic research much more efficient. Here, the “Franziszeischer Kataster“ could play a key role. Especially in the candidate countries in Eastern and South-eastern Europe, land surveying to this day would be unthinkable without this land register. A digital version of the register, could provide enormous support to the surveyor’s offices in the new Member States.
series other
email bor@gku.magwien.gv.at
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id acadia07_174
id acadia07_174
authors Bontemps, Arnaud; Potvin, André; Demers, Claude
year 2007
title The Dynamics of Physical Ambiences
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 174-181
summary This research proposes to support the reading of physical ambiences by the development of a representational technique which compiles, in a numerical interface, two types of data: sensory and filmic. These data are recorded through the use of a portable array equipped with sensors (Potvin 1997, 2002, 2004) as well as the acquisition of Video information of the moving environment. The compilation of information is carried out through a multi-media approach, by means of a program converting the environmental data into dynamic diagrams, as well as the creation of an interactive interface allowing a possible diffusion on the Web. This technique, named APMAP/Video, makes it possible to read out simultaneously spatial and environmental diversity. It is demonstrated through surveys taken at various seasons and time of the day at the new Caisse de dépôt et de placement headquarters in Montreal which is also the corpus for a SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council) research grant on Environmental Adaptability in Architecture (Potvin et al. 2003-2007). This case study shows that the technique can prove of great relevance for POEs (Post Occupancy Evaluation) as well as for assistance in a new design project.
series ACADIA
email arnaudbontemps@hotmail.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id 3509
authors Bourdakis, V. and Day, A.
year 1997
title The VRML Model of the City of Bath
source Proceedings of the Sixth International EuroplA Conference, europia Productions
summary The aim of this research project is to utilise VRML models in urban planning in order to provide easy-to-use visualisation tools that will allow non-experts to understand the implications of proposed changes to their city. In this paper, issues related to the construction and use of large urban models are discussed based on the authors' experience constructing the Bath computer model. Problems faced during the creation, translation and final adaptation of the original CAD model are presented, the solutions devised are demonstrated and suggestions regarding the management of similar projects are given.
series other
email V.Bourdakis@prd.uth.gr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 2873
authors Brin, S. and Page, L.
year 1998
title The Anatomy of a Large-Scale Hypertextual Web Search Engine
source Computer Science Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
summary In this paper, we present Google, a prototype of a large-scale search engine which makes heavy use of the structure present in hypertext. Google is designed to crawl and index the Web efficiently and produce much more satisfying search results than existing systems. The prototype with a full text and hyperlink database of at least 24 million pages is available at http://google.stanford.edu/ To engineer a search engine is a challenging task. Search engines index tens to hundreds of millions of web pages involving a comparable number of distinct terms. They answer tens of millions of queries every day. Despite the importance of large-scale search engines on the web, very little academic research has been done on them. Furthermore, due to rapid advance in technology and web proliferation, creating a web search engine today is very different from three years ago. This paper provides an in-depth description of our large-scale web search engine -- the first such detailed public description we know of to date. Apart from the problems of scaling traditional search techniques to data of this magnitude, there are new technical challenges involved with using the additional information present in hypertext to produce better search results. This paper addresses this question of how to build a practical large-scale system which can exploit the additional information present in hypertext. Also we look at the problem of how to effectively deal with uncontrolled hypertext collections where anyone can publish anything they want.
series other
email page@cs.stanford.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ecaade03_117_101_bund
id ecaade03_117_101_bund
authors Bund, Sébastien and Do, Ellen Yi-Luen
year 2003
title SPOT! Fetch Light - Interactive navigable 3D visualization of direct sunlight
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 117-124
summary SPOT is a 3D environment for direct sunlight visualization. Implemented in Java 3D, SPOT features two distinct and complementary components: Time Projection and Navigable Animation for virtual interaction. SPOT supports multi-dimensional data visualization including sun angle variations with diurnal and annual cycles in threedimensional space. In SPOT users can sketch on any surface in the 3D environment to indicate the area for simulation. SPOT then generates a spatial distribution representation of the illuminance level on a selected surface over time, rendered with colors of varied gradients. SPOT also enables designers to visualize the temporal information of light distribution over time for a given point. For each point clicked on the 3D model, SPOT generates a calendar diagram where the X and Y axis represent the months of the year and the time of the day. The color of each cell of the calendar is the result of the calculation of the light amount reaching the selected point.
keywords Daylighting, virtual worlds, virtual environments, sketching in 3D, gestureinterface, multi-dimension information visualization
series eCAADe
email ellendo@cmu.edu
more http://depts.washington.edu/archbook
last changed 2004/10/04 05:49

_id sigradi2005_634
id sigradi2005_634
authors Burt, Richard; Robert Warden, Ozgur Gonen, Vinod Srinivasan
year 2005
title Digitally Documenting D-Day: The use of Close Range Digital Photogrammetry at Pointe du Hoc
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 634-639
summary This paper describes the progress of a multi-disciplinary team from Texas A&M University to digitally document the command post at one of the most significant historic sites of the D-Day landings: Pointe du Hoc. The methods used to collect survey data for both the production of 2D Historic American Building Survey drawings and for the 3D digital model are described. The processes used to produce the 3D digital model involves collecting survey data using digital photogrammetry and then applying surfaces to that model using modeling software. The results of the first season’s survey work are described and illustrated. Finally, the problems encountered with lighting and the digital photogrammetry processing are discussed and recommendations made for future work.
series SIGRADI
email rburt@archmail.tamu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ecaade2017_173
id ecaade2017_173
authors Buš, Peter, Hess, Tanja, Treyer, Lukas, Knecht, Katja and Lu, Hangxin
year 2017
title On-site participation linking idea sketches and information technologies - User-driven Customised Environments
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 543-550
summary The paper introduces the methodology related to the topic of citizen-driven urban design and revises the idea of on-site participation of end-users, which could prospectively lead to customisation of architectural and urban space in a full-scale. The research in the first phase addresses the engagement of information technologies used for idea sketching in participatory design workshop related to local urban issues in the city of Chur in Switzerland by means of the Skity tool, the sketching on-line platform running on all devices. Skity allows user, which can be individual citizens or a community, to sketch, build, and adapt their ideas for the improvement of an urban locality. The participant is the expert of the locality because he or she lives in this place every day. The content of this paper is focused on the participatory design research project conducted as a study at the ETH Zürich and the Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft HTW in Chur in collaboration with Future Cities Laboratory in Singapore, mainly concentrated on the first step of the methodological approach introduced here.
keywords responsive cities; urban mass-customisation; idea sketching; ideation; on-site participation; citizen design science
series eCAADe
email bus@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2017/09/13 13:13

_id acadia07_268
id acadia07_268
authors Cantrell, Bradley E.
year 2007
title Ambient Space
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 268-275
summary An exploration of streetscape lighting that responds to site phenomena provides a basis to explore the abilities of sensor driven devices to construct landscape form. The project expresses multiple reactive spaces through a hypothetical design project on Pine Street in New York City. The landscape is the input using the variables of wind, sound, motion, and light in order to focus, open, lower, and contract each lighting device. As the landscape progresses throughout the day, season, and/or year, various relationships are created in form and light to organize spaces on multiple scales. Data becomes the armature for scripted reactions allowing the infrastructure to respond for safety or efficiency. With the proliferation of sensor networks and sensor systems, the possibilities arise for the re-articulation of data expression. The single lighting device works within a network that is connected by the specifi c phenomenology of the site. The project is grounded historically in the landscape folly, an architectural device that is not what it appears to be (Figure 1).
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email cantrell@lsu.edu
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id cf2019_016
id cf2019_016
authors Cardoso Llach, Daniel and Scott Donaldson
year 2019
title An Experimental Archaeology of CAD Using Software Reconstruction to Explore the Past and Future of ComputerAided Design
source Ji-Hyun Lee (Eds.) "Hello, Culture!"  [18th International Conference, CAAD Futures 2019, Proceedings / ISBN 978-89-89453-05-5] Daejeon, Korea, p. 130
summary This paper proposes software reconstruction as a method to shed new light into the material, gestural, and sensual dimensions of computer-aided design technologies. Specifically, it shows how by combining historical research and creative prototyping this method can bring us closer to distant ways of seeing, touching, drawing, and designing—while raising new questions about the impact of CAD technologies on present-day architectural practices. It documents the development of two software reconstructions—of Ivan Sutherland’s “Sketchpad” and of Steven A. Coons’s “Coons Patch”—and reflects on the responses they elicited in the context of two exhibitions. The paper shows how software reconstruction can offer access to overlooked aspects of computer-aided design systems, specially their material and sensual dimensions, and how we may explore its broader potential for research, preservation, pedagogy, and speculative design of design technologies.
keywords Software Reconstruction, Media Archaeology, CAD, Sketchpad, Steven A. Coons, Ivan Sutherland, Computational Design History
series CAAD Futures
email dcardoso@cmu.edu
last changed 2019/07/29 12:08

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