CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 38

_id ijac20097408
id ijac20097408
authors Biloria, Nimish; Valentina Sumini
year 2009
title Performative Building Skin Systems: A Morphogenomic Approach Towards Developing Real-Time Adaptive Building Skin Systems
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 7 - no. 4, 643-676
summary Morphogenomics, a relatively new research area, involves understanding the role played by information regulation in the emergence of diverse natural and artificially generated morphologies. Performative building skin systems as a bottom-up parametric formation of context aware interdependent, ubiquitously communicating components leading to the development of continually performative systems is one of the multi-scalar derivations of the aforementioned Morphogenomic understanding. The agenda of adaptations for these building skins specifically corresponds to three domains of adaptation: structural, behavioral and physiological adaptations resulting in kinetic adaptability, energy generation, conservation, transport and usage principles as well as material property based changes per component. The developed skins adapt in real time via operating upon ubiquitous communication and data-regulation protocols for sensing and processing contextual information. Computational processes and information technology based tools and techniques such as parametric design, real-time simulation using game design software, environmental information mapping, sensing and actuating systems coupled with inbuilt control systems as well as manufacturing physical models in collaboration with praxis form a vital part of these skin systems. These experiments and analysis based on developing intrinsic inter-dependencies between contextual data, structure and material logistics thus lay the foundation for a new era of continually performing, self powering, real-time adaptive intelligent building skin systems.
series journal
last changed 2010/09/06 06:02

_id 2006_786
id 2006_786
authors Burry, Jane and Mark Burry
year 2006
title Sharing hidden power - Communicating latency in digital models
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 786-793
summary As digital spatial models take on the complex relationships inherent in a lattice of dependencies and variables, how easy is it to fully comprehend and communicate the underlying structure and logical subtext of the architectural model: the metadesign? The design of a building, the relationships between a host of different attributes and performances was ever a complex system. Now the models, the representations, are in the early stages of taking on more of that complexity and reflexivity. How do we share and communicate these modelling environments or work on them together? This paper explores the issue through examples from one particular associative geometry model constructed as research to underpin the collaborative design development of the narthex of the Passion Façade on the west transept of Gaudi’s Sagrada Família church, part of the building which is now in the early stages of construction.
keywords Design communication; CAD CAM; mathematical models
series eCAADe
email jane.burry@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 7ffb
authors Ciftcioglu, Özer and Durmisevic, Sanja
year 2001
title Knowledge management by information mining
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 533-545
summary Novel information mining method dealing with soft computing is described. By this method, in the first step, receptive fields of design information are identified so that connections among various design aspects are structured. By means of this, complex relationships among various design aspects are modeled with a paradigm, which is non-parametric and generic. In the second step, the structured connections between various pairs of aspects are graded according to the relevancy to each other. This is accomplished by means of sensitivity analysis, which is a computational tool operating on the model established and based on a concept measuring the degree of dependencies between pairs of quantities. The degree of relationships among various design aspects so determined enables one to select the most important independent aspects in the context of design or decision-making process. The paper deals with the description of the method and presents an architectural case study where numerical and as well as non-numerical (linguistic) design information are treated together, demonstrating a ranked or elective information employment which can be of great value for possible design intervention during reconstruction.
keywords Knowledge Management, Information Mining, Sensitivity Analysis
series CAAD Futures
email ciftciog@mail.bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 3207
authors Emmerik, Maarten J.G.M. van
year 1990
title Interactive design of parameterized 3D models by direct manipulation
source Delft University of Technology
summary The practical applicability of a computer-aided design system is strongly influenced by both the user interface and the internal model representation. A well designed user interface facilitates the communication with the system by offering an intuitive environment for for specification and representation of model information. An internal model representation, capable of storing geometric, topological and hierarchical dependencies between components in a model, increases the efficiency of the system by facilitating modification and elaboration of the model during the different stages of the design process. The subject of this thesis is the integration of a high level parameterized model representation with direct manipulation interface techniques for the design of three-dimensional objects. A direct manipulation interface enables the user to specify a model by interaction on a graphical representation, as an alternative for an abstract and error-prone apha-numerical dialogue style. A high level model representation is obtained by using a procedural modeling language with general purpose control structures, including arithmetic and logical expressions, repetition, conditionals, functions and procedures, and dedicated data types such as coordinate systems, geometric primitives and geometric constraints. The language interpreter is interconnected with a graphical interface, an incremental constraint solver and a geometrical modeler, using visual programming techniques. The developed techniques are implemented in a modeling system called GeoNode. The system incorporates paradigms of object-oriented design, with respect to both the user interface and to the system implementation. The applicability of the presented techniques is illustrated by examples in application domains such as solid modeling, kinematic analysis, feature modeling and top-down design.
keywords CAD/CAM
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id c547
authors Fenves, Stephen J. and Rasdorf, William J.
year 1985
title Treatment of Engineering Design Constraints in a Relational Database
source Engineering with Computers. Springer-Verlag, Spring, 1985. vol. 1: pp. 27-37. includes bibliography
summary A major aspect of engineering design is the formulation, application, evaluation, and satisfaction of design constraints. The ability to represent and process a wide variety of such constraints is a necessary ingredient of an engineering design database. This is especially true in databases integrating several design processes, where the database management system must serve as an active design agent performing many of the consistency and integrity checks that are currently done manually. This paper presents a mechanism for representing and processing engineering design constraints. The mechanism can be used for checking that constraints are satisfied as well as for deriving attribute values that satisfy the applicable constraints. Furthermore, the mechanism provides flexibility in sequencing the enforcement of constraints by allowing new constraints to be applied to a preexisting state of the database as well as to all subsequent operations on the database. In both these respects, the mechanism proposed appears to have applications beyond engineering design. The mechanism presented handles a broad class of single-relation, single-tuple constraints typical in engineering design applications. Instead of relying on normalization where possible, to remove functional dependencies, the mechanism incorporates new attributes that represent the status (satisfied or violated) of each constraint, thereby increasing the functional dependence of the relation. Consequently, passive constraint checking can be readily extended to active assignment of attribute values that automatically satisfy constraints. A prototype system implementing many of the components presented has been programmed in Pascal. In addition, portions of the system were implemented using the Relational Information Management (RIM) system, a commercially available DBMS
keywords civil engineering, design, knowledge, relational database, CAE, constraints management
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 2363
authors Gross, Mark Donald
year 1986
title Design as exploring constraints
source Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture
summary A theory of designing is proposed, developed, and illustrated with examples from the domain of physical form. Designing is seen as the exploration of alternative sets of constraints and of the regions of alternative solutions they bound. Designers with different objectives reach different solutions within the same set of constraints, as do designers with the same objectives operating under different constraints. Constraints represent design rules, relations, conventions, and natural laws to be maintained. Some constraints and objectives are given at the outset of a design but many more are adopted along the way. Varying the constraints and the objectives is part of the design process. The theory accounts for various kinds of expertise in designing: knowledge of particular constraints in a design domain; inference--calculating the consequences of design decisions; preference--using objectives to guide decision-making; and partitioning--skill in dividing a large and complicated design into sets of simpler pieces, and understanding the dependencies between decisions. The ability to manage ambiguity and vagueness is an important aspect of design expertise. A computational model supporting the theory is proposed and its implementation discussed briefly. The constraint explorer, a computational environment for designing based on constraint descriptions is described. We see how the constraint explorer might be used in connection with a simple space- planning problem. The problem is taken from the procedures of the Stichting Architecten Research (S.A.R.), a specific architectural design methodology developed to help architects systematically explore layout variability in alternative floorplan designs. Finally, a selected review of related work in constraint-based programming environments, architectural design methods, and the intersection of the two fields is presented.
series thesis:PhD
email mdgross@u.washington.edu
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu
last changed 2003/03/15 05:49

_id ecaade2017_255
id ecaade2017_255
authors Heinrich, Mary Katherine, Ayres, Phil and Bar-Yam, Yaneer
year 2017
title A Multiscale Model of Morphological Complexity in Cities - Characterising Emergent Homogeneity and Heterogeneity
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 561-570
summary Approaches from complex systems science can support design decision-making by extracting important information about key dependencies from large, unstructured data sources. This paper presents an initial case study applying such approaches to city structure, by characterising low-level features and aggregate properties of artifact morphology in urban areas. First, shape analysis is used to describe microscale artifact clusters, analysed in aggregate to characterise macroscale homogeneity and heterogeneity. The characterisation is used to analyse real-world example cities, from both historic maps and present-day crowdsourced data, testing against two performance evaluation criteria. Next, the characterisation is used to generate simple artificial morphologies, suggesting directions for future development. Finally, results and extensions are discussed, including real-world applications for decision support.
keywords Complex systems; morphology; shape analysis; urban planning
series eCAADe
email mhei@kadk.dk
last changed 2017/09/13 13:30

_id sigradi2014_132
id sigradi2014_132
authors Hu, Yongheng; Qinying Li, Feng Yuang, Han Li
year 2014
title The BIM based Responsive Environmental Performance Design Methodology
source SIGraDi 2014 [Proceedings of the 18th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-9974-99-655-7] Uruguay- Montevideo 12,13,14 November 2014, pp. 120-125
summary The concept of “families” lies in the core of internal data structure in Building Information Modeling (BIM). The elements of this modeling platform are all associated with each other as parts of the “families”, independent of their geometrical structure, materiality, parametric dependencies or their physical connection to other elements. Through the associations introduced among the parameters of the ‘families’ members, this study aims at establishing a methodology for a multi-objective evaluation of the environmental performance of the building as an organism. The methodology is founded on a system of different values and weights attributed to the parameters of the families members which are adjusted and fine-tuned through a series of iterations, thus affecting the overall building performance towards an optimum goal. The performance evaluation method used in the “families” methodology is not limited to the individual assessment of the environmental performance objectives or to an integrated multi-objective weighting mechanism; as an overall evaluation platform it checks and balances the individual characteristics of the system not as static conclusive results but as dynamic criteria intended to guide the overall design and building process. The importance of this paper lies in the construction of a concrete methodological set of tools for the assessment of the environmental performance of the building. It will lead the way in independent research in the field of architectural design and the development of ecological thinking and building in China.
keywords BIM ‘families’; Multi-Objective Generic Algorithm; Environmental Performance Simulation; Multi-Objective Environmental Performance Optimization
series SIGRADI
email toto4356@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id 53ad
authors Huang, Jeffrey
year 1997
title Interorganizational Systems in Design
source Harvard University, Graduate School of Design
summary This thesis employs recent developments in coordination theory to analyze and map the coordination processes among participating firms in building design. The process model enables an understanding of the activities and dependencies in the collaborative design process, based on which potential implications of Interorganizational Information Systems (IOS), such as concurrent design platforms, vertical information links and electronic marketplaces, can be understood and critically assessed. Part One defines the parameters of the research, and contrasts the implementation of IOS in the aerospace, automobile and consulting industry to the state of practice in the building design industry. From the comparison, the need for fundamentally rethinking and redesigning the building design process is derived. Part Two describes how this can be accomplished by making the coordination processes in building design explicit. The building design process is decomposed into its core activities and dependencies, and new ways of recomposing the processes are identified which use alternative coordination mechanisms facilitated by IOS. Part Three describes the implications of the process model. Suggestions for appropriate IOS are made, and evidence of IOS applications in design is given in the analysis of four field studies, and in an example redesign of a design process.
series thesis:PhD
email jhuang@gsd.harvard.edu
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id avocaad_2003_21
id avocaad_2003_21
authors Jaroslaw Szewczyk
year 2003
title Technology and Local Values; Computer – Aided Acting with Regional Heritage
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary The problems of storage of local cultural heritage in digital databases, are reported in the paper. An exemplar case of RuralXML framework is presented. Three main groups of challenges relating to “culturally rich” databases are recognised:1. Estimation of the significance of digital databases for supporting design process, educational needs and scientific investigations;2. The conceptual problems with digital representation of “the paper heritage”3. The technical problems related to the architectural databases.The most important aspects of the problem are mentioned, as a background to a discussion about the reciprocal dependencies between technology and local values, i.e. how technology supports acting with the local architectural heritage, and how “cultural significance” values technology. We claim that digital technology not only enables storage and management of such data, but it also adds a new dimension to the design, making it “locally-sensitive” and oriented towards context by means of employing digitally archived architectural data. The accessibility to information about the “local” architecture heritage is important for local as well as global design. The premises for such statements, are presented.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
email jarsz@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

_id 1a59
authors Jeng, Taysheng
year 2000
title Towards a Process-Centric, Asynchronous Collaborative Design Environment
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 15-24
summary The objective of this paper is to develop an effective multi-user computer environment supporting design collaboration. As design teams are distributed in different positions in time-space, coordination becomes a challenging problem for any collaborative projects. This paper addresses the coordination problem by modeling the dependencies between activities. The prototype of a future generation of collaborative design systems is presented. It concentrates on establishing a software infrastructure towards a process-centric, asynchronous collaborative environment.
series CAADRIA
email tsjeng@mail.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2000/08/07 07:11

_id acadia03_018
id acadia03_018
authors Kalay, Yehuda E. and Jeong, Yongwook
year 2003
title Collaborative Design Process Simulation Game
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 133-141
summary Collaboration is an important aspect of the architect’s education. However, it is not amenable to the traditional project-based learning pedagogy that works so well for developing form-making skills. Being a process, rather than a product, it cannot be revealed by judging the results alone, which is often how form-making skills are taught and judged. Rather, the process of collaboration is only evident when the number of the participants exceeds a certain threshold, and when actions taken by other participants affect an individual’s on-going design decisions. The advent of on-line, multi-player simulation games provides an analogy and an opportunity to explore interactive collaborative design pedagogies. Their abstract nature helps focus attention on the core issues of the simulated phenomenon, while the playful nature of a game, as opposed to “work,” encourages immersion and role playing that contribute to the learning process. This paper describes an on-line game for simulating the design collaboration process. It espouses to simulate, exercise, and provide a feel for the social dimension of collaboration, by embedding mutual dependencies that encourage players to engage each other—in adversarial or collaborative manners—to accomplish their goals. Specifically, it is intended to help students understand what collaboration is, why it is necessary, and how it is done. The game is modeled after popular board games like Scrabble and Monopoly: players build “houses” made of colored cubes on a site shared with other players. Actions taken by one player immediately affect his/her neighbors. A carefully constructed set of rules awards or deducts points for every action taken by a player and by his/her neighbors. The rules were constructed in such a manner that players who collaborate (in a variety of ways) stand to gain more points than those who do not. The player with the most points “wins.”
series ACADIA
email ywjeong@uclink.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id caadria2003_c5-3
id caadria2003_c5-3
authors Kalay, Yehuda E. and Jeong, Yongwook
year 2003
title Collaborative Design Simulation Game
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 745-758
summary Collaboration is an is an important aspect of the architect's education. However, it is not amenable to the traditional project-based learning pedagogy that works so well for developing form-making skills, because it can only be revealed when the number of participants exceed a certain threshold, and when actions made by others affect the individual's design decisions. The advent of on-line, multi-player games provides an opportunity to explore interactive collaborative design pedagogies. Their abstraction helps focus attention on the core issues of the simulated phenomenon, while the playful nature of a game, as opposed to 'work,' encourages immersion and role playing that contribute to the learning process. This paper describes an on-line game for simulating design collaboration. It espouses to simulate, exercise, and provide a feel for the social dimension of collaboration, by embedding mutual dependencies that encourage players to engage each other-in adversarial or collaborative manner-to accomplish their goals. Specifically, it is intended to help students understand what is collaboration, why it is necessary, and how it is done. The game is modeled after popular board games like Scrabble and Monopoly: players build 'houses' made of colored cubes on a site shared with other players.' A carefully constructed set of rules awards or deducts points for every action taken by a player or by his/her neighbors. The rules were constructed in such a manner that players who collaborate (in a variety of ways) stand to gain more points than those who do not. The player with the most points 'wins.'
series CAADRIA
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id ijac20031407
id ijac20031407
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.; Jeong, Yongwook
year 2003
title A Collaborative Design Simulation Game
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 4
summary Collaboration is an is an important aspect of the architect's education. However, it is not amenable to the traditional project-based learning pedagogy that works so well for developing form-making skills, because it can only be revealed when the number of participants exceed a certain threshold, and when actions made by others affect the individual's design decisions. The advent of on-line, multi-player games provides an opportunity to explore interactive collaborative design pedagogies. Their abstraction helps focus attention on the core issues of the simulated phenomenon, while the playful nature of a game, as opposed to 'work,' encourages immersion and role playing that contribute to the learning process. This paper describes an on-line game for simulating design collaboration. It espouses to simulate, exercise, and provide a feel for the social dimension of collaboration, by embedding mutual dependencies that encourage players to engage each other - in adversarial or collaborative manner - to accomplish their goals. Specifically, it is intended to help students understand what is collaboration, why it is necessary, and how it is done. The game is modeled after popular board games like Scrabble and Monopoly: players build 'houses' made of colored cubes on a site shared with other players.' A carefully constructed set of rules awards or deducts points for every action taken by a player or by his/her neighbors. The rules were constructed in such a manner that players who collaborate (in a variety of ways) stand to gain more points than those who do not. The player with the most points 'wins.'
series journal
email kalay@socrates.Berkeley.edu
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id caadria2006_217
id caadria2006_217
authors KILIAN, AXEL
year 2006
title DESIGN EXPLORATION WITH CIRCULAR DEPENDENCIES: A chair design experiment
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 217-226
summary The paper demonstrates the need for advanced models of representation for circular dependency networks common in design problems that deal with multiple constraints. Constraints in a design problem are generally perceived as limitations to design exploration. The careful construction of constraint relationships can help to turn constraints into design drivers for the problem instead. Closely related to the notion that new goals may emerge from creating designs is the idea that one goal of planning may be the design activity itself (Simon 1981). The interplay of many constraints can lead to circular dependencies that make design exploration a challenge as any change causes ripples throughout the entire design construct. D’Arcy Thompson (1942) describes form as a diagram of forces. The construction of design representations that reflect such dependency networks pose a challenge and are far from exact matches of the task environment (Simon 1981). The paper proceeds in mapping these abstract observations of the circular dependencies in the design process to a chair experiment from design to fabrication giving detailed descriptions of the interdependencies of material, fabrication and aesthetic constraints. The experiment shows how those constraints were instrumental in achieving the aesthetics of the full scale prototype.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email akilian@alum.mit.edu
last changed 2007/07/23 05:08

_id 521e
authors Klein, M., Sayama, H., Faratin, P. and Bar-Yam, Y.
year 2001
title What Complex Systems Research Can Teach Us About Collaborative Design
source Proceedings of International Workshop on CSCW in Design, London, Ontario, Canada, pp. 5-12
summary Collaborative design is challenging because strong interdependencies between design issues make it difficult to converge on a single design that satisfies these dependencies and is acceptable to all participants. Complex systems research has much to offer to the understanding of these dynamics. This paper describes some insights from the complex systems perspective.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 61d6
authors Klein, M., Sayma, H., Faratin, P. and Bar-Yam, Y.
year 2002
title A Complex Systems Perspective on How Agents Can Support Collaborative Design
source Gero JS and Brazier FMT (eds) (2002) Agents in Design 2002. Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, pp. 95-111
summary Almost all complex artifacts nowadays, including physical artifacts such as airplanes, as well as informational artifacts such as software, organizational designs, plans and schedules, are created via the interaction of many, sometimes thousands of participants, working on different elements of the design. This collaborative design process is typically expensive and time-consuming because strong interdependencies between design decisions make it difficult to converge on a single design that satisfies these dependencies and is acceptable to all participants. Complex systems research concerning the generic dynamics of distributed networks has much to offer to the understanding of this process. This paper describes some insights derived from this novel perspective.
series other
email m_klein@mit.edu
last changed 2003/05/10 08:16

_id 565a
authors Klos, J., Miller, D. and Wrona, S.
year 1996
title Role of Information in Architectural Design
source PWN
summary Collaborative design is challenging because strong interdependencies between design issues make it difficult to converge on a single design that satisfies these dependencies and is acceptable to all participants. Complex systems research has much to offer to the understanding of these dynamics. This paper describes some insights from the complex systems perspective.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 45e1
authors Kolarevic, Branko
year 1999
title Relations-Based Drawing
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 121-125
summary The paper describes the use of a graphic system based on regulating lines and their geometric relations as a qualitatively different medium for shape delineation and dynamic drawing manipulation. It demonstrates how the proposed relations-based approach to design can benefit designers by expanding their ability to speculate about possibilities through dynamic manipulation of the drawing's relational structure. The relational description of shapes is introduced as an explicit formulation of a strategy to form generation and creative discovery. Design begins by first laying out the interrelated regulating lines - its organizing framework. Shapes are then constructed by delineating underlying and intersecting regulating lines. By allowing some lines to control positions and orientations of other lines through geometric relations and dependencies, designers can structure the behavior of the object being designed under future transformations. As design evolves, shapes depicting an evolving design concept can be manipulated and changed dynamically, thus permitting designers to efficiently explore many different options.
series SIGRADI
email branko@pobox.upenn.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:54

_id ecaade2010_214
id ecaade2010_214
authors Lemberski, David; Hemmerling, Marco
year 2010
title Mixer Modeling – An Intuitive Design Tool: Using a hardware controller to actuate parametric design software
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.453-458
summary Music and architecture share not only phenomenological similarities in relation to their characteristics - like volume, timbre, tone pitch, instrumentation vs. geometry, materiality, light ambiance or perspective - but imply as well comparability in the process of creation. The investigation of digital tools that cross borders between music and architecture was the starting point for the research project „Mixer Modeling“. Against this background the paper discusses the transformation of a musical composition controller into an intuitive design tool for the generation of architectural geometries. In the same amount that the use of a MIDI-controller increases the degrees of freedom for the simultaneous activation of various parameters the definition of geometric dependencies on the level of visual programming become more important for the resulting geometry.
wos WOS:000340629400049
keywords Intuitive design tool; Parametric design; Music and architecture; Hardware controller; MIDI; Visual programming; Human-computer interaction
series eCAADe
email david.lemberski@hs-owl.de
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

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