CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 21 to 40 of 2695

_id 75a8
authors Achten, Henri H.
year 1997
title Generic representations : an approach for modelling procedural and declarative knowledge of building types in architectural design
source Eindhoven University of Technology
summary The building type is a knowledge structure that is recognised as an important element in the architectural design process. For an architect, the type provides information about norms, layout, appearance, etc. of the kind of building that is being designed. Questions that seem unresolved about (computational) approaches to building types are the relationship between the many kinds of instances that are generally recognised as belonging to a particular building type, the way a type can deal with varying briefs (or with mixed use), and how a type can accommodate different sites. Approaches that aim to model building types as data structures of interrelated variables (so-called ‘prototypes’) face problems clarifying these questions. The research work at hand proposes to investigate the role of knowledge associated with building types in the design process. Knowledge of the building type must be represented during the design process. Therefore, it is necessary to find a representation which supports design decisions, supports the changes and transformations of the design during the design process, encompasses knowledge of the design task, and which relates to the way architects design. It is proposed in the research work that graphic representations can be used as a medium to encode knowledge of the building type. This is possible if they consistently encode the things they represent; if their knowledge content can be derived, and if they are versatile enough to support a design process of a building belonging to a type. A graphic representation consists of graphic entities such as vertices, lines, planes, shapes, symbols, etc. Establishing a graphic representation implies making design decisions with respect to these entities. Therefore it is necessary to identify the elements of the graphic representation that play a role in decision making. An approach based on the concept of ‘graphic units’ is developed. A graphic unit is a particular set of graphic entities that has some constant meaning. Examples are: zone, circulation scheme, axial system, and contour. Each graphic unit implies a particular kind of design decision (e.g. functional areas, system of circulation, spatial organisation, and layout of the building). By differentiating between appearance and meaning, it is possible to define the graphic unit relatively shape-independent. If a number of graphic representations have the same graphic units, they deal with the same kind of design decisions. Graphic representations that have such a specifically defined knowledge content are called ‘generic representations.’ An analysis of over 220 graphic representations in the literature on architecture results in 24 graphic units and 50 generic representations. For each generic representation the design decisions are identified. These decisions are informed by the nature of the design task at hand. If the design task is a building belonging to a building type, then knowledge of the building type is required. In a single generic representation knowledge of norms, rules, and principles associated with the building type are used. Therefore, a single generic representation encodes declarative knowledge of the building type. A sequence of generic representations encodes a series of design decisions which are informed by the design task. If the design task is a building type, then procedural knowledge of the building type is used. By means of the graphic unit and generic representation, it is possible to identify a number of relations that determine sequences of generic representations. These relations are: additional graphic units, themes of generic representations, and successive graphic units. Additional graphic units defines subsequent generic representations by adding a new graphic unit. Themes of generic representations defines groups of generic representations that deal with the same kind of design decisions. Successive graphic units defines preconditions for subsequent or previous generic representations. On the basis of themes it is possible to define six general sequences of generic representations. On the basis of additional and successive graphic units it is possible to define sequences of generic representations in themes. On the basis of these sequences, one particular sequence of 23 generic representations is defined. The particular sequence of generic representations structures the decision process of a building type. In order to test this assertion, the particular sequence is applied to the office building type. For each generic representation, it is possible to establish a graphic representation that follows the definition of the graphic units and to apply the required statements from the office building knowledge base. The application results in a sequence of graphic representations that particularises an office building design. Implementation of seven generic representations in a computer aided design system demonstrates the use of generic representations for design support. The set is large enough to provide additional weight to the conclusion that generic representations map declarative and procedural knowledge of the building type.
series thesis:PhD
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
more http://alexandria.tue.nl/extra2/9703788.pdf
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id eea1
authors Achten, Henri
year 1997
title Generic Representations - Typical Design without the Use of Types
source CAAD Futures 1997 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-7923-4726-9] München (Germany), 4-6 August 1997, pp. 117-133
summary The building type is a (knowledge) structure that is both recognised as a constitutive cognitive element of human thought and as a constitutive computational element in CAAD systems. Questions that seem unresolved up to now about computational approaches to building types are the relationship between the various instances that are generally recognised as belonging to a particular building type, the way a type can deal with varying briefs (or with mixed functional use), and how a type can accommodate different sites. Approaches that aim to model building types as data structures of interrelated variables (so-called 'prototypes') face problems clarifying these questions. It is proposed in this research not to focus on a definition of 'type,' but rather to investigate the role of knowledge connected to building types in the design process. The basic proposition is that the graphic representations used to represent the state of the design object throughout the design process can be used as a medium to encode knowledge of the building type. This proposition claims that graphic representations consistently encode the things they represent, that it is possible to derive the knowledge content of graphic representations, and that there is enough diversity within graphic representations to support a design process of a building belonging to a type. In order to substantiate these claims, it is necessary to analyse graphic representations. In the research work, an approach based on the notion of 'graphic units' is developed. The graphic unit is defined and the analysis of graphic representations on the basis of the graphic unit is demonstrated. This analysis brings forward the knowledge content of single graphic representations. Such knowledge content is declarative knowledge. The graphic unit also provides the means to articulate the transition from one graphic representation to another graphic representation. Such transitions encode procedural knowledge. The principles of a sequence of generic representations are discussed and it is demonstrated how a particular type - the office building type - is implemented in the theoretical work. Computational work on implementation part of a sequence of generic representations of the office building type is discussed. The paper ends with a summary and future work.
series CAAD Futures
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.n
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 28b9
authors Achten, Henri
year 2001
title Future Scenario for a Collaborative Design Session
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 163-168 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary A collaborative design project consists of a team of design partners who are engaged during the period of the project in a particular design task. The group forms a short-lived community with the goal to create a design. The environment in which this is done today, consists of the participants office spaces, completed with equipment such as drawing tables, coffee machines, fax machines, CAD stations, etc. None of these elements reflect the existence of the (temporary) community that a design partner participates in. In this workshop paper we propose that the current two-dimensional desktop metaphor in a computer does not adequately support collaborative design. The typical 2D-desktop multiple open windows with different applications gives a fractured view of the design project in which by contrast the designer as a person conceives of himself as a whole. Moreover, the sense of place, or a consistent identity in which the design takes place is also lacking. The notion of _virtual environmentsÑ can assist in further developing design support for collaborative design in the future, as is sketched in the following outline.
series other
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id 7e52
authors Achten, Henri
year 2001
title Normative Positions in Architectural Design - Deriving and Applying Design Methods
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 263-268
summary This paper presents a recently finished course of eight weeks where CAAD skills, design methodology, and architectural theory are combined to discuss possible perspectives on the use of the computer in design, and its influence on architecture. In the course, three contemporary architects were studied; Peter Eisenman, Ben van Berkel, and Greg Lynn. Each was discussed on aspects of ontology (which are the elements of discourse), design method (design process and organization of the process), and the use of the computer (techniques and approaches). These were linked with design theory, architectural theory, and CAD-theory. The reflection on the work of the architects resulted in a number of design methods for each architect. The design methods were adapted to the available technologies in the university as well as to the scope of the exercise, since the period of eight weeks for an exercise cannot compete with design processes in practice that take many participants and much time. The students then applied the design methods to a design task: student housing and an exhibition pavilion on the campus area of the university. The task was so devised, that students could focus on either architectural or urban design level with one of the design methods. Also, the choice of architects and accompanying design methods was made in such a way that students with low, medium, and advanced computer skills could take part in the course and exercise. In a workshop held at the Czech Technical University (CVUT) in Prague, the same procedure was used in a one-week period for a different design task, but in an otherwise almost identical setting with respect to the CAAD software used. The methods and material were easily transferred to the other setting. The students were able to cope with the task and produced surprising results in the short time span available. The paper will provide an overview of the course, discuss the pedagogical implications of the work, and discuss how this particular work can be generalized to incorporate other architects and approaches.
keywords CAAD: Design Methods, Pedagogy
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 2006_106
id 2006_106
authors Achten, Henri
year 2006
title Feature clusters for online recognition of graphic units in drawings
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 106-112
summary Automated recognition of sketch drawings can provide the means for a natural interface between the designer and a design support system. Sketch drawing recognition is knowledge-intensive in the sense that the system must know what to look for in a drawing. In earlier work, we identified 24 different types of representations, termed graphic units. For recognition of graphic units we combine a multi-agent approach and online recognition. Each agent is specialised for one graphic unit. It continuously parses the online input stream for stroke features that fall within its scope. When an agent-specific threshold is reached, the agent puts a claim. Each agent has a specific cluster of features that can be viewed as distributed over a decision tree. The activation pattern of feature clusters over the decision tree is an indication which graphic unit is likely to be identified by the system. In this paper, we present the exhaustive set of features for agents and a binary decision tree over which the features are distributed.
keywords Image recognition; sketches; graphic units; feature-based modelling
series eCAADe
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ecaade2013_096
id ecaade2013_096
authors Achten, Henri
year 2013
title Buildings with an Attitude
source Stouffs, Rudi and Sariyildiz, Sevil (eds.), Computation and Performance – Proceedings of the 31st eCAADe Conference – Volume 1, Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, 18-20 September 2013, pp. 477-485
summary In order to achieve interactive architecture it is necessary to consider more than the technological components of sensors, controllers, and actuators. The interaction can be focused to different interaction activities: instructing, conversing, manipulating, and exploring (we propose to call this the interaction view). Additionally, the purpose of the building may range from performing, sustaining, servicing, symbolising, to entertaining (we propose to call this the world view). Combined, the interaction view and world view establish 20 different attitudes, which are flavours of behaviour for the interactive building. Through attitudes interaction profiles can be established and criteria derived for the design of interactive buildings.
wos WOS:000340635300050
keywords Interactive architecture; design theory; Human-Computer Interaction; augmented reality; mixed reality.
series eCAADe
email achten@fa.cvut.cz
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ecaade2015_280
id ecaade2015_280
authors Adilenidou, Yota
year 2015
title Error as Optimization - Using Cellular Automata Systems to Introduce Bias in Aggregation Models through Multigrids
source Martens, B, Wurzer, G, Grasl T, Lorenz, WE and Schaffranek, R (eds.), Real Time - Proceedings of the 33rd eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria, 16-18 September 2015, pp. 601-610
summary This paper is focusing on the idea of error as the origin of difference in form but also as the path and the necessity for optimization. It describes the use of Cellular Automata (CA) for a series of structural and formal elements, whose proliferation is guided through sets of differential grids (multigrids) and leads to the buildup of big span structures and edifices as, for example, a cathedral. Starting from the error as the main idea/tool for optimization, taxonomies of morphological errors occur and at a next step, they are informed with contextual elements to produce an architectural system. A toolbox is composed that can be implemented in different scales and environmental parameters, providing variation, optimization, complexity and detail density. Different sets of experiments were created starting from linear structural elements and continuing to space dividers and larger surface components.
wos WOS:000372316000067
series eCAADe
email yota_adilenidou@hotmail.com
more https://mh-engage.ltcc.tuwien.ac.at/engage/ui/watch.html?id=5cf73be0-6e8f-11e5-b7a4-1b188b87ef84
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id acadia19_168
id acadia19_168
authors Adilenidou, Yota; Ahmed, Zeeshan Yunus; Freek, Bos; Colletti, Marjan
year 2019
title Unprintable Forms
source ACADIA 19:UBIQUITY AND AUTONOMY [Proceedings of the 39th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-578-59179-7] (The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture, Austin, Texas 21-26 October, 2019) pp.168-177
summary This paper presents a 3D Concrete Printing (3DCP) experiment at the full scale of virtualarchitectural bodies developed through a computational technique based on the use of Cellular Automata (CA). The theoretical concept behind this technique is the decoding of errors in form generation and the invention of a process that would recreate the errors as a response to optimization (Adilenidou 2015). The generative design process established a family of structural and formal elements whose proliferation is guided through sets of differential grids (multi-grids) leading to the build-up of large span structures and edifices, for example, a cathedral. This tooling system is capable of producing, with specific inputs, a large number of outcomes in different scales. However, the resulting virtual surfaces could be considered as "unprintable" either due to their need of extra support or due to the presence of many cavities in the surface topology. The above characteristics could be categorized as errors, malfunctions, or undesired details in the geometry of a form that would need to be eliminated to prepare it for printing. This research project attempts to transform these "fabrication imprecisions" through new 3DCP techniques into factors of robustness of the resulting structure. The process includes the elimination of the detail / "errors" of the surface and their later reinsertion as structural folds that would strengthen the assembly. Through this process, the tangible outputs achieved fulfill design and functional requirements without compromising their structural integrity due to the manufacturing constraints.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email yota_adilenidou@hotmail.com
last changed 2019/12/18 08:01

_id sigradi2004_349
id sigradi2004_349
authors Adriana Simeone; Roberto Segre; José Ripper Kós
year 2004
title O processo de desenvolvimento da ferramenta cidade interativa [The Developmental Process of an Interactive City Tool]
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary This paper exposes site .Cidade Interativa. development process, based on: a reflection about importance of users. points of view.s incorporation for space remodelling; a study about theoretical and practical experiences which, in different ways, approached potencialities of participation of a community.s members in a project; and, finally, a investigation of propagation alternatives of individual readings as information source for urban project, trying to enhance points of view that generally remain occult in the form of invisible practices of anonymous users. This site must be understood as concretion of an idea: creating a vehicle from which is possible to become individual readings public, so that these are shared and, also, make them available to people responsible for urban projects as information source.
series SIGRADI
email asimeone@ufrj.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 9c0c
authors Af Klercker, Jonas and HenrichsÈn, Jan
year 2001
title Can simulations in VE support architects in solving complex design problems?
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 77-82 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary Building design is facing development of industrialization of the production on the one hand and more complex 'One of a Kind' products on the other. This will be for rebuilding of a large stock of existing buildings and what can be left to new production. In both cases the results of the design process have to be solid to guarantee a successful product. In both cases an integrated and careful design process is absolutely crucial. The demands on the built environment make the systems of buildings more and more complex and have to be handled by a lot of different expertise. To avoid the 'Relay Race' of today the design teams of tomorrow must work much more integrated. To make integrated solutions, which means simultaneous constrains on all systems, the experts of different fields have to understand more of how all engaged systems relate and influence each other. Communication then consists of complex situations and processes that have to be understood and related to reality. In this aspect a multidimensional Virtual Environment interface has advantages and has been successfully used in design processes in other industries. In this paper the problems that have to be studied are for example Methodical, Conceptual, Technical and Process economical.
series other
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id 6b70
authors Af Klercker, Jonas and Pittioni, Gernot
year 2002
title Architect and Structural Engineer in interactive design
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 386-389
summary We are convinced that an interactive design process involving engineers and architects will create values to a project. Looking back there have been some obstacles, like a week’s time for exchange of drawings with traditional postal services; manual calculation methods, which could not be spoiled on loose grounds like architect’s sketches; different media – architect’s drawings and engineer’s numbers in tables; attitudes and traditional roles, implemented already in education. Today most of these obstacles can be overcome and we have made a test. We have used ArchiCad by Graphisoft and FEM-design by SKANSKA IT Solutions to test to make an interactive design. Our conclusions are that exchange of information, drawings and other documents is more or less routine in praxis, and it works almost instantly. Computers make calculation faster and easier for the engineer. Though we would wish to have software which manages to do more rapid estimations. Even simulations such as of loads on a structure are practically possible. By using model based CAD the data can be used for transferring quantities for calculations as well as visualization of the design as a platform for collaborate analysis. The technique is developed and usable but to gain acceptance and make use of it is also a matter of attitudes and of application activities in education.
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
last changed 2013/02/04 05:50

_id 0e93
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1989
title Interactive Animation on the Macintosh II
source CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4] Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989, pp. 9.5.1-9.5.6
summary The efficiency of images in communication between humans has so far been used almost exclusively by TV and other mass medias. The costs have been too great to encourage the use of images in the financially restricted everyday practice of architecture. With a range of application programs for the Apple Macintosh II the vision has come close to reality. It is now possible to create guided walks with the chance to choose different routes and views in a model of buildings and surroundings in 256 colour graphics. The makers of these programs may not have foreseen this use for their products and that is why it takes quite a lot of effort to make all the necessary images. With some supplementary routines however, this will be made much easier. Animation can also be used to visualize different processes inside a building. We have been studying the working environment in mechanical industry. The goal of this project is to make communication possible between the workers at all levels of an organization in planning changes and has so far been very successful. The use of this technique is only limited by our imagination and funding. Some examples to be tested in the near future are "Escape at a fire", "Animation of a Dairy", "Traffic situations in a parking lot-, "CAD-working place" and others. One of the difficulties in interactive planning with users has been to come close enough to their reality. With animated images it is possible to visualize what is going to happen and what it is going to look like in a more understandable way. In education this must be a challenging possibility. Changes and processes are some of the most difficult subjects to describe and explain! The software used is a handful of individual programs which, thanks to the graphics standards of the Macintosh, can exchange data with each other.

series eCAADe
email Jonas.af_Klercker@caad.lth.se
more http://www.caad.lth.se/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 6cb2
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1995
title Architects Early Sketching on Computer Using Multimedia
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 247-256
summary This paper presents a development work which aims at practical applications of ideas built on experiences in practise and education and the theoretical development in the BAS.CAAD project. The important difference between BAS.CAAD and CAD programs of today is the possibility to handle user organisation, building design and site in the same program. This means that design today has to be done in at least 3 separate programs with different ways of defining objects. It is then a computer technical problem to mix and study the relations between objects of separate origin. In a recent project our method to overcome this difficulty in CAAD computing was using a Multimedia program making visual simulations to analyse consequences of form etc. As the process went on and forms where more concrete it was possible to make simulations worth showing and discussing to involve colleagues, clients and users.

series eCAADe
email Jonas.af_Klercker@caad.lth.se
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_51.htm
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ae61
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1999
title CAAD - Integrated with the First Steps into Architecture
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 266-272
summary How and when should CAAD be introduced in the curriculum of the School of Architecture? This paper begins with some arguments for starting CAAD education at the very beginning. At the School of Architecture in Lund teachers in the first year courses have tried to integrate CAAD with the introduction to architectural concepts and techniques. Traditionally the first year is divided by several subjects running courses separatly without any contact for coordination. From the academic year 96/97 the teachers of Aplied aestetics, Building Science, Architectural design and CAAD have decided to colaborate as much as possible to make the role of our different fields as clear as possible to the students. Therefore integrating CAAD was a natural step in the academic year 98/99. The computer techniques were taught one step in advance so that the students can practise their understanding of the programs in their tasks in the other subjects. The results were surprisingly good! The students have quickly learned to mix the manual and computer techniques to make expressive and interesting visual presentations of their ideas. Some students with antipaty to computers have overcome this handicap. Some interesting observations are discussed.
keywords Curriculum, First Year Studies, Integration, CAAD, Modelling
series eCAADe
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 01c0
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 2000
title Modelling for Virtual Reality in Architecture
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 209-213
summary CAAD systems are using object modelling methods for building databases to make information available. Object data must then be made useful for many different purposes in the design process. Even if the capacity of the computer will allow an almost unlimited amount of information to be transformed, the eye does not make the transformations in the same “simple” mathematical way. Trained architects have to involve in an inventive process of finding ways to “harmonize” this new medium with the human eye and the architect’s professional experience. This paper will be an interimistic report from a surveying course. During the spring semester 2000 the CAAD division of TU-Lund is giving a course “Modelling for VR in Architecture”. The students are practising architects with experience from using object modelling CAAD. The aims are to survey different ways to use available hard- and software to create VR-models of pieces of architecture and evaluate them in desktop and CAVE environments. The architect is to do as much preparation work as possible with his CAAD program and only the final adjustments with the special VR tool.
keywords CAAD, VR, Modelling, Spatial Experience
series eCAADe
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id sigradi2014_075
id sigradi2014_075
authors Afsari, Kereshmeh; Chuck Eastman
year 2014
title Categorization of building product models in BIM Content Library portals
source SiGraDi 2014 [Proceedings of the 18th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-9974-99-655-7] Uruguay- Montevideo 12,13,14 November 2014, pp. 370-374
summary BIM Content Libraries are performing as online sources for building product models. In order to effectively use the product models, it is important to organize them systematically within these databases. But currently there is no standard or guideline for this purpose. Products in these libraries are being categorized based on different criteria such as the object classes in the target platform, by referring to multiple classification systems or based on customized categories. This paper studies some of the BIM Content Libraries and investigates the structure that each library is using for product categorization. It indicates the need for a generic framework for the purpose of product categorization in BIM Content Libraries.
keywords BIM objects; Product models; Building models; BIM Content Library; Product category
series SIGRADI
email kafsari3@gatech.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ascaad2014_004
id ascaad2014_004
authors Afsari, Kereshmeh; Matthew E. Swarts and T. Russell Gentry
year 2014
title Integrated Generative Technique for Interactive Design of Brickworks
source Digital Crafting [7th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2014 / ISBN 978-603-90142-5-6], Jeddah (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia), 31 March - 3 April 2014, pp. 49-64
summary Bricks have been used in the construction industry as a building medium for millennia. Distinct patterns of bricks depict the unique aesthetic intentions found in Roman, Gothic and Islamic architecture. In contemporary practice, the use of digital tools in design has enabled methodologies for creating new forms in architecture. CAD and BIM systems provide new opportunities for designers to create parametric objects for building form generation. In masonry design, there exists an inherent contradiction between traditional patterns in brick design, which are formal and prescribed, and the potential for new patterns generated using design scripting. In addition, current tools do not provide interactive techniques for the design of brickwork patterns that can manage constant changes parametrically, to inform and influence design process, by providing design feedback on the constructive and structural aspects of the proposed brick pattern and geometry. This research looks into the parametric techniques that can be applied to create different kinds of patterns on brick walls. It discusses a methodology for an interactive brickwork design within generative techniques. By integrating data between two computational platforms – the first based on image analysis and the second on parametric modeling, we demonstrate a methodology and application that can generate interactive arbitrary patterns and map it to the brick wall in real-time.
series ASCAAD
email kafsari3@gatech.edu
last changed 2016/02/15 12:09

_id sigradi2012_186
id sigradi2012_186
authors Aghaei Meibodi, Mania; Aghaiemeybodi, Hamia
year 2012
title Symbiosis of Structural & Non-Structural properties in Building
source SIGraDi 2012 [Proceedings of the 16th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Brasil - Fortaleza 13-16 November 2012, pp. 602-606
summary This paper highlights the different interplays between structural and non-structural parts in building artifact as the result of modes of building processes and massing. The massing is understood as processes of assembling material into a body through which we identify with the building physically. In the last decade architecture discipline as the result of technological inventions has faced shifts in the design processes, massing processes and topology of the artefact. In which we witness integral coexistence between the structural and non-structural elements of building. In this paper the seeds of this integral interplay is scrutinised through the study of design and massing processes of a multi-functional pavilion prototype as a case study.
keywords digital surface; prototype; design processes; structural; formation
series SIGRADI
email mania.meibodi@ltu.se
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ijac201715203
id ijac201715203
authors Agirbas, Asli and Emel Ardaman
year 2017
title Macro-scale designs through topological deformations in the built environment
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 15 - no. 2, 134-147
summary Design studies are being done on contemporary master-plans which may be applied in many locations worldwide. Advances in information technology are becoming the base model of design studies, and these may be more effective than the efforts of humans in the field of architecture and urban design. However, urban morphology variables and constants must be considered while designing contemporary master-plans in the existing built environment. The aims of this study were to extend the use of computer software for different applications and to make a topological work in the regional context. Accordingly, a case study was made using the nCloth simulation tools to create non-Euclidean forms while protecting the road system, which is one of the constant parameters of urban morphology in the built environment.
keywords Conceptual design, built environment, simulation, contemporary master-plans, urban morphology, topology
series other
type normal paper
email asliagirbas@gmail.com
last changed 2019/08/02 06:30

_id sigradi2018_1628
id sigradi2018_1628
authors Agirbas, Asli
year 2018
title The Use of Multi-Software in Undergraduate Architectural Design Studio Education: A Case Study
source SIGraDi 2018 [Proceedings of the 22nd Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISSN: 2318-6968] Brazil, São Carlos 7 - 9 November 2018, pp. 1059-1064
summary In the architectural design process, instead of using the computer programs effectively, the ability of choosing the most suitable program for the purpose takes place. However, different programs used in the design process serve different purposes. Therefore, the use of more than one program throughout the project design process arises. Every day the number of programs used increases rapidly. Hence, the designers find difficult to adapt this speed. The same applies to the students of architectural design studio course. Therefore, in this study with undergraduate architecture students, a pilot study focusing on the use of multi-software was conducted within the scope of architectural design studio. The process and outputs were evaluated.
keywords Use of multi-software; Contextual design; Architectural design education; CAAD
series SIGraDi
email asliagirbas@gmail.com
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