CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 211

_id sigradi2003_020
id sigradi2003_020
authors Abarca, R., Díaz, S. and Moreno, S.
year 2003
title Desarrollo de material informatico-educativo para la enseñanza de la geometría a estudiantes de diseño (Development of IT-based educational material for the teaching of geometry to students of design)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary This paper is born as an answer to the meaningful learning difficulties and academic performance in Spatial and Flat Geometry course on second year Design School at Universidad de las Americas University, Santiago de Chile. The problem is faced from the potentiality that digital environment gives us in representation, display options, shape and projection testing, analysis and non visual accounts to teach flat and spatial geometry within the receptors' codes and coherent with designer's own language.
series SIGRADI
email rabarca@terra.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ascaad2009_mohamed_abdalla
id ascaad2009_mohamed_abdalla
authors Abdalla, Mohamed Saad Atia
year 2009
title 3D Model and Decision Support System for Fire Safety: A case study of Kingdom of Bahrain
source Digitizing Architecture: Formalization and Content [4th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2009) / ISBN 978-99901-06-77-0], Manama (Kingdom of Bahrain), 11-12 May 2009, pp. 419-430
summary Fire agencies on all levels try hard to save lives, properties, and natural resources. Accurate access to critical information is essential in this regard, many agencies around the world have embraced GIS as a tool that helps them balance needs, uses, and hazards to promote sustainability of the environment while identifying and limiting vulnerability. At Kingdom of Bahrain, Ministry of interior established the Geographic Security System (GSS) to enhance the emergency response. The 3D of the GSS Consisted of 3 main parts: (1) 3D for terrain model, (2) 3D model for entire targeted zones, and (3) 3D models for individual buildings. In this paper, the integration between GSS system and 3D model will be illustrated, and how this kind of integration could enhance decision support system (DSS) for fire safety at kingdom of Bahrain. On other hand, we will highlight the technical and legislation difficulties faced in this project. Also, the future steps to enhance DSS will be discussed.
series ASCAAD
email msaad2000@msn.com
last changed 2009/06/30 06:12

_id 0e93
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1989
title Interactive Animation on the Macintosh II
source CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4] Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989, pp. 9.5.1-9.5.6
summary The efficiency of images in communication between humans has so far been used almost exclusively by TV and other mass medias. The costs have been too great to encourage the use of images in the financially restricted everyday practice of architecture. With a range of application programs for the Apple Macintosh II the vision has come close to reality. It is now possible to create guided walks with the chance to choose different routes and views in a model of buildings and surroundings in 256 colour graphics. The makers of these programs may not have foreseen this use for their products and that is why it takes quite a lot of effort to make all the necessary images. With some supplementary routines however, this will be made much easier. Animation can also be used to visualize different processes inside a building. We have been studying the working environment in mechanical industry. The goal of this project is to make communication possible between the workers at all levels of an organization in planning changes and has so far been very successful. The use of this technique is only limited by our imagination and funding. Some examples to be tested in the near future are "Escape at a fire", "Animation of a Dairy", "Traffic situations in a parking lot-, "CAD-working place" and others. One of the difficulties in interactive planning with users has been to come close enough to their reality. With animated images it is possible to visualize what is going to happen and what it is going to look like in a more understandable way. In education this must be a challenging possibility. Changes and processes are some of the most difficult subjects to describe and explain! The software used is a handful of individual programs which, thanks to the graphics standards of the Macintosh, can exchange data with each other.

series eCAADe
email Jonas.af_Klercker@caad.lth.se
more http://www.caad.lth.se/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 730e
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1997
title Implementation of IT and CAD - what can Architect schools do?
source AVOCAAD First International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-01-09] Brussels (Belgium) 10-12 April 1997, pp. 83-92
summary In Sweden representatives from the Construction industry have put forward a research and development program called: "IT-Bygg 2002 -Implementation". It aims at making IT the vehicle for decreasing the building costs and at the same time getting better quality and efficiency out of the industry. A seminar was held with some of the most experienced researchers, developers and practitioners of CAD in construction in Sweden. The activities were recorded and annotated, analysed and put together afterwards; then presented to the participants to agree on. Co-operation is the key to get to the goals - IT and CAD are just the means to improve it. Co-operation in a phase of implementation is enough problematic without the technical difficulties in using computer programs created by the computer industry primarily for commercial reasons. The suggestion is that cooperation between software companies within Sweden will make a greater market to share than the sum of all individual efforts. In the short term, 2 - 5 years, implementation of CAD and IT will demand a large amount of educational efforts from all actors in the construction process. In the process of today the architect is looked upon as a natural coordinator of the design phase. In the integrated process the architect's methods and knowledge are central and must be spread to other categories of actors - what a challenge! At least in Sweden the number of researchers and educators in CAAD is easily counted. How do we make the most of it?
series AVOCAAD
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ascaad2007_035
id ascaad2007_035
authors Al-Ali, A.I.
year 2007
title Readiness for the Use of Technology for effective learning via the vds: Case of the United Arab Emirates
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 439-456
summary Review of the literature indicated that today’s knowledge-driven economy demands a workforce equipped with complex skills and attitudes such as problem solving, meta-cognitive skills, critical thinking and lifelong learning. Such skills can be acquired if learning and teaching are guided by the constructivist and cognitive learning theories. In particular, the constructivist approach emphasises effective learning processes based on learning by doing and collaboration. This approach is congruent with use of technologies, such as Virtual Design Studio (VDS), for the purpose of architecture education in design courses, but such use is lacking in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). It is thus important to assess the extent to which the constructivist and cognitive theories are implemented in teaching design courses in the Architecture schools of the UAE. It is also important to assess the effectiveness of employing technology in general and VDS in particular in implementing these theories. The author intends to study the relationship between effective learning on one hand and using VDS in implementing the constructivist and cognitive approaches on the other hand. Thus, the author conducted a preliminary study to gain a basic understanding of the difficulties, approaches, attitudes, perceptions, and motivation related to the learning of design in architecture schools in the UAE. Second, the investigation was designed to assess the extent to which the students would be interested in the use of sophisticated technology in the teaching and learning environment in the UAE architecture education schools in order to achieve effective learning. The study has been conducted in the United Arab Emirates University (UAEU). Methodology used for this was the focus group method. In addition to the focus group interviews with the UAEU students, unstructured individual interviews with lecturers from UAEU and the American University of Sharjah (AUS) have been carried out. Data analysis showed that students were not satisfied with the current teaching methods based on traditional lectures. It was concluded that students were ready to practice effective learning of design via the intermarriage of VDS and the constructivist and cognitive approaches. An ambiguity that remained was whether students were ready for assessment methods which are consistent with the constructivist approach.
series ASCAAD
email aalali@glam.ac.uk
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id eb5f
authors Al-Sallal, Khaled A. and Degelman, Larry 0.
year 1994
title A Hypermedia Model for Supporting Energy Design in Buildings
source Reconnecting [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-03-9] Washington University (Saint Louis / USA) 1994, pp. 39-49
summary Several studies have discussed the limitations of the available CAAD tools and have proposed solutions [Brown and Novitski 1987, Brown 1990, Degelman and Kim 1988, Schuman et al 1988]. The lack of integration between the different tasks that these programs address and the design process is a major problem. Schuman et al [1988] argued that in architectural design many issues must be considered simultaneously before the synthesis of a final product can take place. Studies by Brown and Novitski [1987] and Brown [1990] discussed the difficulties involved with integrating technical considerations in the creative architectural process. One aspect of the problem is the neglect of technical factors during the initial phase of the design that, as the authors argued, results from changing the work environment and the laborious nature of the design process. Many of the current programs require the user to input a great deal of numerical values that are needed for the energy analysis. Although there are some programs that attempt to assist the user by setting default values, these programs distract the user with their extensive arrays of data. The appropriate design tool is the one that helps the user to easily view the principal components of the building design and specify their behaviors and interactions. Data abstraction and information parsimony are the key concepts in developing a successful design tool. Three different approaches for developing an appropriate CAAD tool were found in the literature. Although there are several similarities among them, each is unique in solving certain aspects of the problem. Brown and Novitski [1987] emphasize the learning factor of the tool as well as its highly graphical user interface. Degelman and Kim [1988] emphasize knowledge acquisition and the provision of simulation modules. The Windows and Daylighting Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) emphasizes the dynamic structuring of information, the intelligent linking of data, the integrity of the different issues of design and the design process, and the extensive use of images [Schuman et al 19881, these attributes incidentally define the word hypermedia. The LBL model, which uses hypermedia, seems to be the more promising direction for this type of research. However, there is still a need to establish a new model that integrates all aspects of the problem. The areas in which the present research departs from the LBL model can be listed as follows: it acknowledges the necessity of regarding the user as the center of the CAAD tool design, it develops a model that is based on one of the high level theories of human-computer interaction, and it develops a prototype tool that conforms to the model.

series ACADIA
email l-degelman@neo.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id avocaad_2001_18
id avocaad_2001_18
authors Aleksander Asanowicz
year 2001
title The End of Methodology - Towards New Integration
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The present paper is devoted to the deliberation on the genesis and development of designing from the point of view of the potential use of computers in the process. Moreover, it also presents the great hopes which were connected with the use of the systematic designing methods in the 1960’s, as well as the great disappointment resulting from the lack of concrete results. At this time a great deal of attention was paid to the process of design as a branch of a wider process of problem-solving. Many people believed that the intuitive methods of design traditionally used by architects were incapable of dealing with the complexity of the problems to be solved. Therefore, the basic problem was the definition of a vertical structure of the designing process, which would make it possible to optimise each process of architectural design. The studies of design methodology directed at the codification of the norms of actions have not brought about any solutions which could be commonly accepted, as the efforts to present the designing process as a formally logical one and one that is not internally “uncontrary” from the mathematical point of view, were doomed to fail. Moreover, the difficulties connected with the use of the computer in designing were caused by the lack of a graphic interface, which is so very characteristic of an architect’s workshop. In result, the methodology ceased to be the main area of the architect’s interest and efforts were focused on facilitating the method of the designer’s communication with the computer. New tools were created, which enabled both the automatic generation of diversity and the creation of forms on the basis of genetic algorithms, as well as the presentation of the obtained results in the form of rendering, animation and VRML. This was the end of the general methodology of designing and the beginning of a number of methods solving the partial problems of computer-supported design. The present situation can be described with the words of Ian Stewart as a “chaotic run in all directions”. An immediate need for new integration is felt. Cyber-real space could be a solution to the problem. C-R-S is not a virtual reality understood as an unreal world. Whilst VR could be indeed treated as a sort of an illusion, C-R-S is a much more realistic being, defining the area in which the creative activities are taking place. The architect gains the possibility of having a direct contact with the form he or she is creating. Direct design enables one to creatively use the computer technology in the designing process. The intelligent system of recognising speech, integrated with the system of virtual reality, will allow to create an environment for the designer – computer communication which will be most natural to the person. The elimination of this obstacle will facilitate the integration of the new methods into one designing environment. The theoretical assumptions of such an environment are described in the present paper.
series AVOCAAD
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id bba7
authors Alexander, Christopher W.
year 1964
title Notes on the Synthesis of Form
source Harvard Graduate School of Design
summary Every design problem begins with an effort to achieve fitness between two entities: the form in question and its context. The form is the solution to the problem; the context defines the problem. We want to put the context and the form into effortless contact or frictionless coexistence, i.e., we want to find a good fit. For a good fit to occur in practice, one vital condition must be satisfied. It must have time to happen. In slow-changing, traditional, unselfconscious cultures, a form is adjusted soon after each slight misfit occurs. If there was good fit at some stage in the past, no matter how removed, it will have persisted, because there is an active stability at work. Tradition and taboo dampen and control the rate of change in an unselfconscious culture's designs. It is important to understand that the individual person in an unselfconscious culture needs no creative strength. He does not need to be able to improve the form, only to make some sort of change when he notices a failure. The changes may not always be for the better; but it is not necessary that they should be, since the operation of the process allows only the improvements to persist. Unselfconscious design is a process of slow adaptation and error reduction. In the unselfconscious process there is no possibility of misconstruing the situation. Nobody makes a picture of the context, so the picture cannot be wrong. But the modern, selfconscious designer works entirely from a picture in his mind - a conceptualization of the forces at work and their interrelationships - and this picture is almost always wrong. To achieve in a few hours at the drawing board what once took centuries of adaptation and development, to invent a form suddenly which clearly fits its context - the extent of invention necessary is beyond the individual designer. A designer who sets out to achieve an adaptive good fit in a single leap is not unlike the child who shakes his glass-topped puzzle fretfully, expecting at one shake to arrange the bits inside correctly. The designer's attempt is hardly as random as the child's is; but the difficulties are the same. His chances of success are small because the number of factors which must fall simultaneously into place is so enormous. The process of design, even when it has become selfconscious, remains a process of error-reduction. No complex system will succeed in adapting in a reasonable amount of time or effort unless the adaptation can proceed component by component, each component relatively independent of the others. The search for the right components, and the right way to build the form up from these components, is the greatest challenge faced by the modern, selfconscious designer. The culmination of the modern designer's task is to make every unit of design both a component and a system. As a component it will fit into the hierarchy of larger components that are above it; as a system it will specify the hierarchy of smaller components of which it itself is made.
series thesis:PhD
email services@patternlanguage.com
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 3653
authors Alshawi, M. and Budeiri, M.J.
year 1993
title An Integrated approach for 3D simulation of construction sequence
source The Int. Journal of Construction IT 1(2), pp. 35-46
summary In order to eliminate design-related problems and to ease planning difficulties, a new integrated approach is required to manage and present design and construction information. This paper examines the feasibility of integrating design and construction scheduling information produced by 'industry standard' software. It describes the structure of a prototype which has been developed to generate a 3D simulation model for the construction sequence by integrating a CAD package with a project planning software. This study aims at establishing an integrated approach to communicate construction planning graphically to users (designers or construction managers) prior to construction in order to enhance the efficiency of the design/construction process.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id a927
authors Amirante, Isabella and Bosco, Antonio
year 1995
title Hypertext Between Research and Teaching: An Experience in a Didactic Building Technology Laboratory
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 3-12
summary IPER (hypertext for the knowledge of building patrimony) is the result of a research developed with C.N.R. (National Research Institute). The aim of IPER is to provide the knowledge, the description and the management of one or more historical buildings for public or private institutions. IPER allowed us to improve our methodology of building analysis, covering various disciplinary fields, in two different systems. (1.) the first one, synthetic and suitable for a group of historical buildings, (2.) the second one, complex and particularly made for monumental buildings. // This experience is related to the new regulation of teaching architecture in Italy made in 1993. The main novelty is the introduction of the laboratories with the contemporary presence of two or three teachers of different disciplines, working together with the students on the same project with different approaches. This opportunity allowed us to introduce the "knowledge engineer" as a teacher in the laboratory of building technology. IPER is given to the students with the aim of experimenting and solving the theoretical and practical difficulties that students of different years may encounter in the knowledge and representation of buildings and in the organisation of all the data from the case study.
series eCAADe
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_1.htm
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id diss_anders
id diss_anders
authors Anders, P.
year 2003
title A Procedural Model for Integrating Physical and Cyberspaces in Architecture
source Doctoral dissertation, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, U.K
summary This dissertation articulates opportunities offered by architectural computation, in particular the digital simulation of space known as virtual reality (VR) and its networked, social variant cyberspace. Research suggests that environments that hybridize technologies call for a conception of space as information, i.e. space is both a product of and tool for cognition. The thesis proposes a model whereby architecture can employ this concept of space in creating hybrids that integrate physical and cyberspaces.The dissertation presents important developments in architectural computation that disclose concepts and values that contrast with orthodox practice. Virtual reality and cyberspace, the foci of this inquiry, are seen to embody the more problematic aspects of these developments. They also raise a question of redundancy: If a simulation is good enough, do we still need to build? This question, raised early in the 1990's, is explored through a thought experiment - the Library Paradox - which is assessed and critiqued for its idealistic premises. Still, as technology matures and simulations become more realistic the challenge posed by VR/cyberspace to architecture only becomes more pressing. If the case for virtual idealism seems only to be strengthened by technological and cultural trends, it would seem that a virtual architecture should have been well established in the decade since its introduction.Yet a history of the virtual idealist argument discloses the many difficulties faced by virtual architects. These include differences between idealist and professional practitioners, the failure of technology to achieve its proponents' claims, and confusion over the meaning of virtual architecture among both architects and clients. However, the dissertation also cites the success of virtual architecture in other fields - Human Computer Interface design, digital games, and Computer Supported Collaborative Work - and notes that their adoption of space derives from practice within each discipline. It then proposes that the matter of VR/cyberspace be addressed from within the practice of architecture, a strategy meant to balance the theoretical/academic inclination of previous efforts in this field.The dissertation pursues an assessment that reveals latent, accepted virtualities in design methodologies, instrumentation, and the notations of architectural practices. Of special importance is a spatial database that now pervades the design and construction processes. The unity of this database, effectively a project's cyberspace, and its material counterpart is the subject of the remainder of the dissertation. Such compositions of physical and cyberspaces are herein called cybrids. The dissertation examines current technologies that cybridize architecture and information technology, and proposes their integration within cybrid wholes. The concept of cybrids is articulated in seven principles that are applied in a case study for the design for the Planetary Collegium. The project is presented and critiqued on the basis of these seven principles. The dissertation concludes with a discussion of possible effects of cybrids upon architecture and contemporary culture.
series thesis:PhD
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2005/09/09 10:58

_id ecaade2014_188
id ecaade2014_188
authors Anette Kreutzberg
year 2014
title New Virtual Reality for Architectural Investigations
source Thompson, Emine Mine (ed.), Fusion - Proceedings of the 32nd eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Faculty of Engineering and Environment, Newcastle upon Tyne, England, UK, 10-12 September 2014, pp. 253-260
wos WOS:000361385100027
summary Visually decoding and evaluating digital 3D models in proper scale on screen from within 3D modelling software can be quite difficult due to random zoom-factors, Field of View (FOV) and eye height. Motion and interactive bodily grounded examinations are helpful factors that can be enhanced with the use of Virtual Reality (VR). The purpose of this phenomenological study is to address these difficulties of perception of scale by introducing a Virtual Reality Head Mounted Display (HMD) as an exploration tool and outlining possible ways of utilising this tool in architectural teaching. To achieve the purpose findings of perception of scale and distance; level of abstraction; navigation; and simulator sickness will be discussed in relation to architectural investigation in VR. This will be based on the experiences and findings during two workshops with architecture students qualifying their conceptual designs with the VR HMD.
keywords Virtual reality; level of abstraction; oculus rift hmd; perception of scale; simulator sickness
series eCAADe
email anette.kreutzberg@kadk.dk
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id f95f
authors Angulo, A.H., Davidson, R.J. and Vásquez de Velasco, G.P.
year 2001
title Digital Visualization in the Teaching of Cognitive Visualization
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 292-301
summary Professional design offices claim that our graduates have difficulties with their free-hand perspective drawing skills. This fact, which has become obvious over the last 5 years, is parallel to a clear tendency towards the use of 3-dimensional digital imagery in the projects of our students. Frequently, faculty tends to blame the computer for the shortcomings of our students in the use of traditional media, yet there is no clear evidence on the source of the blame. At a more fundamental level, the visualization skills of our students are questioned. This paper will explain how faculty teaching design communication techniques, with traditional and digital media, are working together in the development of a teaching methodology that makes use of computers in support of our student’s training on cognitive visualization skills, namely; “The Third-Eye Method”. The paper describes the Third-Eye Method as an alternative to traditional methods. As evidence of the benefits offered by the Third-Eye Method, the paper presents the results of testing it against traditional methods among freshman students. At the end, the paper draws as conclusion that computers are not the main source of the problem but a potential solution.
keywords Pedagogy, Visualization, Media
series ACADIA
email Vasquez@taz.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ecaade2011_145
id ecaade2011_145
authors Araújo, Leandro; Andrés, Roberto
year 2011
title BIM.BON . A BIM system for architectural practice in Brazil
source RESPECTING FRAGILE PLACES [29th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-9-4912070-1-3], University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Architecture (Slovenia) 21-24 September 2011, pp.439-443
wos WOS:000335665500050
summary This article discusses the difficulties faced by the BIM (Building Information Modeling) systems to be widely adopted among most part of architecture and engineering professionals in Brazil. A revision of the issue and investigation of possibilities for improving the practice of architecture were made by creating a new model of BIM software addressed to a wider audience. It lists the main critical points in the usability of BIM software, based on a survey made with 300 professionals. The analysis is followed by a study of a new BIM software that could reach a wider audience of architects by implementing a tool that directly links the users to the construction materials market, also including a tool for easy budgetary calculations.
keywords BIM Software; Architectural design; Architecture in Brazil; ICT; Collaborative design
series eCAADe
email leandro@superficie.org
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id sigradi2015_8.143
id sigradi2015_8.143
authors Arcari, Etiene do Amaral; Pereira, Alice Theresinha Cybis; Junior, Roque Costacurta; Mansano, Isadora
year 2015
title Interoperability: A challenge for the Parameterized Modeling Process of Architectural details and its materialization
source SIGRADI 2015 [Proceedings of the 19th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - vol. 1 - ISBN: 978-85-8039-135-0] Florianópolis, SC, Brasil 23-27 November 2015, pp. 341-349.
summary This article describes and analyzes experiments conducted during the development of the master’s work entitled “Parameterized Modeling of Accessibility Design Details: Work Flow In order to have reusability, interoperability and materialization”. Such experiments intended to investigate and verify the potential of interoperability between different architecture software. It was verified the possibility of materialization and reuse of models, where the details worked with a new guise through the context of developing and creating a project in which it was inserted. The difficulties of accessing, sharing and editing data and information were evaluated. The results obtained allowed to identify features and limitations related to the models and their formats.
series SIGRADI
email etiene@eaarq.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2014_015
id sigradi2014_015
authors Aroztegui Massera, Carmen
year 2014
title “No entendí el video”: audiovisual y memoria en el taller de arquitectura [“I didn’t get the video”: Audiovisual and Memory in the Architectural Studio]
source SIGraDi 2014 [Proceedings of the 18th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-9974-99-655-7] Uruguay - Montevideo 12 - 14 November 2014, pp. 179-182
summary This article discusses the introduction of sensible dimensions of space, through the memory of significant places, and the audiovisual as a tool in architectural education. Departing from the tradition of graphic representation and the development of an architectural program, the article decribes the experiece of a studio focused on the remembrance of domestic places and the development of videos. An expected result, the video showed its potential as articulator of sensible dimensions. However, several student projects evidenced a disconnection between its graphic representation and the video, and therefore exposing the difficulties of the experience’s systematization into a design method.
keywords Memory; Video; Architectural Project; Studio
series SIGRADI
email aroztegui@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id caadria2007_611
id caadria2007_611
authors Arpornwicharnop, Kittisak; Pinyo Jinuntuya and Pizzanu Kanongchaiyos
year 2007
title Simulation Software Development for Urban Landscape Possibility Analysis
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary This research paper proposes a simulation software development for possibility analysis of urban landscape development project. Normally, analysis of land potentiality and feasibility study for investment are necessary pre-processed for supporting urban planning, developing and architectural designing. However, most available tools are usually tailor made for each process individually, causing difficulties in information interchange between each processes. In this research, we propose a policy making support system for urban planning project development providing several functions such as testing land use and its physical character which are important to urban expansion and architectural design based on impact analysis of urban comprehensive plan. The proposed integrated system consists of a topological analysis module, constraint checking module and geographical information processing module. First, Geographical information stored in 3D graphic file format is converted to object-oriented data model and stored in a database. With several constraint and regulations, the stored information is then checked in the landscape topological analysis module. In evaluation process, the developed software is tested with geographical information of Bangkok area under constraints and regulations of Building Control Act of Thailand. While controlling building properties, the software can model the buildings and generate urban physical character. The result is then checked by several urban landscape planning experts. Experimental result shows that proposed system provides flexibility in information interchanging with constraints and regulations updating without system reconfiguration. The system also provides internet accessing for public participation in the process of making urban comprehensive plan.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email pizzanu@cp.eng.chula.ac.th
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id 6480
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 1999
title Computer in Creation of Architectural Form
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999,pp. 131-142
summary This paper considers graphic methods of presentation of ideas 'in the creation of architectural forms' and evolution of these methods, determined by the implementations of information technology. Drawings have been the main medium of expression since Leonardo da Vinci to the present-day. Graphic communication has always been treated as a main design tool, both - at the ending stage of design and at the early design stage. Implementation of computers in design doe not change this situation. The entire design process proceeds in a traditional way. While searching for the idea we use hand sketches and, after this, technical drawings are draught on a plotter, which replaces a drawing pen. Using computers at the early design stages encounters serious difficulties. The main thesis of this paper is that hardware and software inadequacy is not the problem, the problem is in the inadequacy of the design methods. This problem is to be reconceived as what a person can do with a program, rather than what is the capacity of a program. Contemporary computer techniques allow us to put an equation mark between the searching for idea, visualisation and its realisation in virtual space. This paper presents Sketching by scanning - an experimental method of using computer hardware and software for stimulating of searching of architectural's form.
series AVOCAAD
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ecaade2016_028
id ecaade2016_028
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 2016
title Digital Architectural Composition - 30 years of experience and experimentation
source Herneoja, Aulikki; Toni Österlund and Piia Markkanen (eds.), Complexity & Simplicity - Proceedings of the 34th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland, 22-26 August 2016, pp. 195-203
wos WOS:000402063700022
summary In this paper the evolution of architectural composition teaching will be presented and discussed. The main point of these deliberations is to consider how digital methods and technologies have influenced the teaching methods and the understanding of compositional rules/principles by students. Another important factor which will be analysed, is the difficulties faced by teachers in the evaluation of students' work. The paper is divided into four parts, each of which concerns different approaches to architectural composition teaching. In the first part the historical background of architectural composition teaching is presented. In the second part traditional teaching methods is described, the third concerns teaching of digital architectural composition, and the fourth - digital architectural composition in virtual space. At the end of each section, the advantages and disadvantages of the discussed methods are presented. These disadvantages were a stimulus for changes in the teaching process, which was enabled thanks to the development of digital technologies (software and hardware) during the last 20 years. The last part of the paper will be devoted to the presentation of potential directions of development of architectural composition teaching methods.Please write your abstract here by clicking this paragraph.
keywords Architectural Composition; digital modelling; Virtual Reality
series eCAADe
email asanowicz@gmail.com
last changed 2017/06/28 08:46

_id 2ff9
id 2ff9
authors Ataman, Osman
year 1993
title Knowledge-based Stair Design
source Education and Practice: The Critical Interface [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-02-0] Texas (Texas / USA) 1993, pp. 163-171
summary The application of computer--based technique to support architectural design has often concentrated on matters of representation. Typically, this means computer-aided drafting, and less frequently, computer-aided modeling and visualization. The promise of new computer-based tools to support the process of design has thus far failed to produce any significant tool that has had a widespread impact on the architectural profession. Most developments remain in university based research labs where they are used as teaching instruments in CAD courses or less often in design studios. While there are many reasons for this lack of dissemination, including a reluctance on the part of the architectural profession itself, the primary obstacles deal with difficulties in explicating design knowledge, representing this knowledge in a manner that can be used for design, and providing an intuitive and effective user interface, allowing the designer to easily use the tool for its intended purpose.

This study describes a system that has been developed to address a number of these issues. Based on research findings from the field of Artificial Intelligence which expounds on the need for multiple techniques to represent any complex area of knowledge, we have selected a particular approach that focuses on multiple techniques for design representation. We review this approach in depth by considering its many facets necessary when implementing a knowledge-based system. We then partially test the viability of this approach through a small case study, implementing a knowledge-based system for designing stairs. While this effort only deals with a small part of the total design process, it does explore a number of significant issues facing the development of computer-based design assistants, and suggests several techniques for addressing these concerns.

series ACADIA
email oataman@uiuc.edu
last changed 2003/12/20 04:40

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