CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 199

_id sigradi2004_192
id sigradi2004_192
authors Adrián J. Levy
year 2004
title Espacios 4-d animados - Arquitectura de la música [4-D Animated Spaces - The Architecture of Music]
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary This project involves the creation of an architecture of music which may be defined as a series of interdisciplinary steps which seek to generate four-dimensional virtual spaces for the materialization of music. This materialization uses music as its .genetic information ., the virtual space as its medium, and the execution time of the musical piece as the fourth dimension to a three-dimensional virtual space. Within this space, each instrument.s execution is represented by a shape whose properties undergo changes resulting from the musical information. Through the use of new Virtual Reality techniques, we will soon have the possibility to be inside the music, as a habitable place. The achievement of this project is to provide the opportunity to experience this representation through virtual animation.
keywords Architecture of music, navigable music, cyberspace, four-dimensional, animation
series SIGRADI
email alevy@in4design.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ijac201816103
id ijac201816103
authors Alani, Mostafa W.
year 2018
title Algorithmic investigation of the actual and virtual design space of historic hexagonal-based Islamic patterns
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 16 - no. 1, 34-57
summary This research challenges the long-standing paradigm that considers compositional analysis to be the key to researching historical Islamic geometric patterns. Adopting a mathematical description shows that the historical focus on existing forms has left the relevant structural similarities between historical Islamic geometric patterns understudied. The research focused on the hexagonal-based Islamic geometric patterns and found that historical designs correlate to each other beyond just the formal dimension and that deep, morphological connections exist in the structures of historical singularities. Using historical evidence, this article identifies these connections and presents a categorization system that groups designs together based on their “morphogenetic” characteristics.
keywords Islamic geometric patterns, morphology, computations, digital design, algorithmic thinking
series journal
email mostafh@g.clemson.edu
last changed 2019/08/07 12:03

_id ga9922
id ga9922
authors Annunziato, M. and Pierucci, P.
year 1999
title The Art of Emergence
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Since several years, the term emergence is mentioned in the paradigm of chaos and complexity. Following this approach, complex system constituted by multitude of individual develop global behavioral properties on the base of local chaotic interactions (self-organization). These theories, developed in scientific and philosophical milieus are rapidly spreading as a "way of thinking" in the several fields of cognitive activities. According to this "way of thinking" it is possible revise some fundamental themes as the economic systems, the cultural systems, the scientific paths, the communication nets under a new approach where nothing is pre-determined, but the global evolution is determined by specific mechanisms of interaction and fundamental events (bifurcation). With a jump in scale of the life, also other basic concepts related to the individuals as intelligence, consciousness, psyche can be revised as self-organizing phenomena. Such a conceptual fertility has been the base for the revision of the artistic activities as flexible instruments for the investigation of imaginary worlds, metaphor of related real worlds. In this sense we claim to the artist a role of "researcher". Through the free exploration of new concepts, he can evoke qualities, configurations and hypothesis which have an esthetical and expressive value and in the most significant cases, they can induce nucleation of cultural and scientific bifurcation. Our vision of the art-science relation is of cooperative type instead of the conflict of the past decades. In this paper we describe some of the most significant realized artworks in order to make explicit the concepts and basic themes. One of the fundamental topics is the way to generate and think to the artwork. Our characterization is to see the artwork not as a static finished product, but as an instance or a dynamic sequence of instances of a creative process which continuously evolves. In this sense, the attention is focused on the "generative idea" which constitutes the envelop of the artworks generable by the process. In this approach the role of technology (computers, synthesizers) is fundamental to create the dimension of the generative environment. Another characterizing aspect of our artworks is derived by the previous approach and specifically related to the interactive installations. The classical relation between artist, artwork and observers is viewed as an unidirectional flux of messages from the artist to the observer through the artwork. In our approach artist, artwork and observer are autonomous entities provided with own personality which jointly intervene to determine the creative paths. The artist which generate the environment in not longer the "owner" of the artwork; simply he dialectically bring the generative environment (provided by a certain degree of autonomy) towards cultural and creative "void" spaces (not still discovered). The observers start from these platforms to generate other creative paths, sometimes absolutely unexpected , developing their new dialectical relations with the artwork itself. The results derived by these positions characterize the expressive elements of the artworks (images, sequences and sounds) as the outcomes of emergent behavior or dynamics both in the sense of esthetical shapes emergent from fertile generative environments, either in terms of emergent relations between artist, artwork and observer, either in terms of concepts which emerge by the metaphor of artificial worlds to produce imaginary hypothesis for the real worlds.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ga9926
id ga9926
authors Antonini, Riccardo
year 1999
title Let's Improvise Together
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The creators of ‘Let's-Improvise-Together’ adhere to the idea that while there is a multitude of online games now available in cyberspace, it appears that relatively few are focused on providing a positive, friendly and productive experience for the user. Producing this kind of experience is one the goals of our Amusement Project.To this end, the creation of ‘Let's Improvise Together’ has been guided by dedication to the importance of three themes:* the importance of cooperation,* the importance of creativity, and* the importance of emotion.Description of the GameThe avatar arrives in a certain area where there are many sound-blocks/objects. Or he may add sound "property" to existing ones. He can add new objects at will. Each object may represents a different sound, they do not have to though. The avatar walks around and chooses which objects he likes. Makes copies of these and add sounds or change the sounds on existing ones, then with all of the sound-blocks combined make his personalized "instrument". Now any player can make sounds on the instrument by approaching or bumping into a sound-block. The way that the avatar makes sounds on the instrument can vary. At the end of the improvising session, the ‘composition’ will be saved on the instrument site, along with the personalized instrument. In this way, each user of the Amusement Center will leave behind him a unique instrumental creation, that others who visit the Center later will be able to play on and listen to. The fully creative experience of making a new instrument can be obtained connecting to Active Worlds world ‘Amuse’ and ‘Amuse2’.Animated colorful sounding objects can be assembled by the user in the Virtual Environment as a sort of sounding instrument. We refrain here deliberately from using the word musical instrument, because the level of control we have on the sound in terms of rythm and melody, among other parameters, is very limited. It resembles instead, very closely, to the primitive instruments used by humans in some civilizations or to the experience made by children making sound out of ordinary objects. The dimension of cooperation is of paramount importance in the process of building and using the virtual sounding instrument. The instrument can be built on ones own effort but preferably by a team of cooperating users. The cooperation has as an important corolary: the sharing of the experience. The shared experience finds its permanence in the collective memory of the sounding instruments built. The sounding instrument can be seen also as a virtual sculpture, indeed this sculpture is a multimedial one. The objects have properties that ranges from video animation to sound to virtual physical properties like solidity. The role of the user representation in the Virtual World, called avatar, is important because it conveys, among other things, the user’s emotions. It is worth pointing out that the Avatar has no emotions on its own but it simply expresses the emotions of the user behind it. In a way it could be considered a sort of actor performing the script that the user gives it in real-time while playing.The other important element of the integration is related to the memory of the experience left by the user into the Virtual World. The new layout is explored and experienced. The layout is a permanent editable memory. The generative aspects of Let's improvise together are the following.The multi-media virtual sculpture left behind any participating avatar is not the creation of a single author/artist. The outcome of the sinergic interaction of various authors is not deterministic, nor predictable. The authors can indeed use generative algorythm in order to create the texture to be used on the objects. Usually, in our experience, the visitors of the Amuse worlds use shareware programs in order to generate their texture. In most cases the shareware programs are simple fractals generators. In principle, it is possible to generate also the shape of the object in a generative way. Taking into account the usual audience of our world, we expected visitors to use very simple algorythm that could generate shapes as .rwx files. Indeed, noone has attempted to do so insofar. As far as the music is concerned, the availability of shareware programs that allow simple generation of sounds sequences has made possible, for some users, to generate sounds sequences to be put in our world. In conclusion, the Let's improvise section of the Amuse worlds could be open for experimentation on generative art as a very simple entry point platform. We will be very happy to help anybody that for educational purposes would try to use our platform in order to create and exhibit generative forms of art.
series other
email Riccardo.Antonini@UniRoma2.it
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ga0236
id ga0236
authors Antonini, Riccardo
year 2002
title Shared, Collective, Generative, Dynamic Virtual Environments - Geneve
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary In this project we plan to create an experimental novel medium setup for the study of the “presence” experience in shared, collective, generative, dynamic virtual environments (GENEVEs) in order to study the cross interactions between a given GENEVE and/among its creators/users and to explore the logic of presence in each GENEVE. The new shareable / generative media will try to add personal creativity and social dimension to telefruition of contents. For the European Industry having a leading edge in the technology for hw/sw/contents for shareable novel media is both a strategic asset and a social imperative.
series other
email Riccardo.Antonini@Uniroma2.it
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ddss9404
id ddss9404
authors Arima, Takafumi and Sato, Seiji
year 1994
title Form Characteristics of Landscape Images: A Landscape Research by Computer Image Processing
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary Landscape evaluation research examines how individuals perceive the landscape. Because the amount of the data to describe landscapes is huge, landscape research needs the technology of the computer. This paper describes a method to catch the amount of physical characteristics which were extracted from landscape images by using the technology of the computer image processing and verifies its effectiveness. To do this analysis, we took photographic slides of a landscape sample. Pictures were taken for three regions (the city centre area, the outskirts area, and the farm village area). The number of slides was 6 for each place hence 18 in total were used for theanalysis. Next, we stored these slides on a computer disk. Form characteristics of the landscape elements were extracted by using computer image processing. Borderlines were extracted usingthe algorithm of Robert and were converted into coordinates data by minute line processing and the vector processing. Other elements were extracted by label processing and were converted into the coordinates data by vector processing. These data thus are the vector data for two-dimensions of the image and not the data for a three-dimension space. The processing of these images enables the analysis of the form characteristics in the landscape images. We calculated the data such as appearing length, angle numbers of appearance of the vector data, and analyzed the characteristic of shape and the complexities of landscape applying fractal theory. We compared three districts and were able to find landscape characteristics of various places as a result.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ascaad2014_036
id ascaad2014_036
authors Assassi, Abdelhalim; Belal Taher and Samai Rachida
year 2014
title Intelligent Digital Craft to Recognize Spatial Installations for Residential Designs
source Digital Crafting [7th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2014 / ISBN 978-603-90142-5-6], Jeddah (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia), 31 March - 3 April 2014, pp. 195-196; 443-456
summary Architecture took an evolutionary context over time, where designers were interested in finding pragmatic spontaneous appropriate solutions and met the needs of people in urban and architectural spaces. Whereas, in modern architecture an intense and varied competition happens between architects through various currents of thoughts , schools and movements, however, that creativity was the ultimate goal , and a the same time we find that every architect distinguishes himself individually or collectively through tools of architectural expression and design representation adopting a school of thought, using , for example, the leaves of various sizes and diverse technical drawing tools to accurately show that he can be read by professionals or craftsmen outside the geographical scope to which it belongs .With the rapid technological development which accompanied the digital craft in the contemporary world , The digital craft summed up time, distance and tools , so they gave the concept more appropriate accuracy , as virtualization has become the most effective tool for Architecture To reach the ideal and typical results at the practical level, or pure research. At the level of residential design and on the grounds that housing plays an important role in the government policies and given that housing is a basic unit common to all urban communities on earth , the use of different programs to show its typicality in two dimensions or in the third dimension - for example, using software "AutoCAD " " 3D Max " , " ArchiCAD " ... etc. - gave virtualisation smart, creative and beautiful forms which lead to better understand the used /or to be used residential spaces, and thus the conclusion that the life system of dwelling under design or under study , as can specifically recognize spatial structure in housing design - using digital software applying "Space Syntax" for example - in the shadow of slowly growing digital and creative development with the help of high-speed computers . the morphological structure of the dwelling is considered to be the most important contemporary residential designs Investigation through which the researcher in this area aims to understand the various behavioral relations and social structures within the projected residential area, using Space Syntax techniques. Through the structural morphology of dwellings can be inferred quality networks, levels of connectivity and depth and places of openness or closure within the dwelling under study, or under design. How, then, have intelligently contributed this digital craft to the perception of those spatial fixtures ? The aim of this research is to apply an appropriate program in the field of vernacular residential design and notably Space syntax which relate to the understanding and analysis of spatial structures, and also demonstrate its role at the morphological and spatial structure aspects, and prove how effective it helps to understand the social logic of domestic space through social individual/collective relationships and behaviors projected on the spatial configurations of dwellings. The answer to the issue raised above and at the methodological aspect, the study discussed the application of space syntax techniques on the subject. The findings tend to prove the efficiency by comparing samples of Berber vernacular domestic spaces from the Mzab, the Aures and Kabilya in Algeria, and has also led to ascertain the intelligibility of space syntax techniques in reading the differences between the behaviors in domestic spaces in different areas of the sample through long periods of time .
series ASCAAD
email abdelhalim.assassi@gmail.com
last changed 2016/02/15 12:09

_id sigradi2009_744
id sigradi2009_744
authors Assumpção, Paula Sobrino de Souza;
year 2009
title A influência do usuário sobre a apresentação visual da informação na web: o caso do layout adaptativo e da personalização de layout [User's influence on the visual presentation of information on the web: the case of adaptive layout and layout’s customization]
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary Ahead of the digital environments expansion which follows the principles of the web 2.0, one can notice a growing opening for user's participation. The proposal of this research is to reflect on how this scenario of participation is strengthening a social structure capable of actively acting not only in the production of digital content, but also in the form of this content presentation. From a survey of cases and a theoretical review, this paper aims to analyze two different types of user’s influence on the visual dimension of web environments. One first - adaptive layout - based on the indirect user’s action and a second - layout’s customization - based on the direct user’s action.
keywords Web design; web 2.0; architecture of participation; visual presentation
series SIGRADI
email paulasobrino@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 4c30
authors Aura, Seppo
year 1993
title Episode as a Unit of Analysis of Movement
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 53-66
summary Everybody who has read his Gordon Cullen or his Edmund H. Bacon knows that movement has long been recognized as a factor in environmental planning in many ways. For example, in the traditional Japanese promenade garden the importance of movement has always been appreciated. The promenader gains an intense experience of the succession, variation and rhythm of the surrounding scene. The spaces and paths lead him from one stage to another. The spatial structure of the Japanese promenade garden, as well as of traditional Japanese architecture in general, is joined most intensively to time and motion. The environment is in relation to the flow of change in many sense, both concretely and existentially. Taking an example of western urban environment. Here perhaps the most marked sequential spaces are to be found in small medieval, mediterranean towns. Thanks to their organic growth, narrow and winding streets and the emphasis on public squares, most of them provide exciting experiences if the observer is only interested in seeing the townscape from the point of view of movement. There are also examples of this kind of environment in Finland. In old wooden towns like Porvoo and Rauma one can still find varied and rhythmic streetscapes and networks of streets and squares, together with a human scale and an almost timeless atmosphere. One could say that such an opportunity to experience spaces sequentially, or as serial visions, is an important dimension for us, especially as pedestrians. And as Gordon Cullen has shown there is in any urban environment much scope to heighten this experience. For example, by creating a sense of ’entering in’ some place, ’leaving for’, ’moving towards’, ’turning into’, ’walking through’ some place or ’following on’ the flow of spaces. Or, as Edmund H. Bacon has said, the departure point of good town planning should be that the successive towns spaces give rise to a flow of harmonic experiences: present experiences merge with earlier ones and become a step towards a future. Or, again in the words of Donald Appleyard, Kevin Lynch and John R. Myer: “The experience of a city is basically of a moving view, and this is the view we must understand if we wish to reform the look of our cities”.
keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id ac57
authors Bae, H.A., Kim, M.R., Shin, S.Y., Kim, H.A. and Yoon, C.S.
year 2002
title An Application of Photogrammetry Measuring Technology to Parametric Modeling of Korean Traditional Wooden Structure
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 139-146
summary To construct a 3D parametric model of Korean traditional wooden structure, the fundamental process is to obtain the dimensions of each building. An application of measuring high technology helps this process accomplished more efficiently. However PhotoModeler is a photogrammetric program to measure the dimension using photographs. The information derived from PhotoModeler is used to clarify the design rule inherent in a Korean traditional mansion type building - UnHyun Palace.
series CAADRIA
email bhanseon@hanmail.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 22d6
authors Ballheim, F. and Leppert, J.
year 1991
title Architecture with Machines, Principles and Examples of CAAD-Education at the Technische Universität München
source Experiences with CAAD in Education and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Munich (Germany) 17-19 October 1991
summary "Design tools affect the results of the design process" - this is the starting point of our considerations about the efficient use of CAAD within architecture. To give you a short overview about what we want to say with this thesis lets have a short - an surely incomplete - trip through the fourth dimension back into the early time of civil engineering. As CAD in our faculty is integrated in the "Lehrstuhl für Hochbaustatik und Tragwerksplanung" (if we try to say it in English it would approximately be "institute of structural design"), we chose an example we are very familiar with because of its mathematical background - the cone sections: Circle, ellipse, parabola and hyperbola. If we start our trip two thousand years ago we only find the circle - or in very few cases the ellipse - in their use for the ground plan of greek or roman theaters - if you think of Greek amphitheaters or the Colosseum in Rome - or for the design of the cross section of a building - for example the Pantheon, roman aqueducts or bridges. With the rediscovery of the perspective during the Renaissance the handling of the ellipse was brought to perfection. May be the most famous example is the Capitol in Rome designed by Michelangelo Buonarotti with its elliptical ground plan that looks like a circle if the visitor comes up the famous stairway. During the following centuries - caused by the further development of the natural sciences and the use of new construction materials, i.e. cast-iron, steel or concrete - new design ideas could be realized. With the growing influence of mathematics on the design of buildings we got the division into two professions: Civil engineering and architecture. To the regret of the architects the most innovative constructions were designed by civil engineers, e.g. the early iron bridges in Britain or the famous bridges of Robert Maillard. Nowadays we are in the situation that we try to reintegrate the divided professions. We will return to that point later discussing possible solutions of this problem. But let us continue our 'historical survey demonstrating the state of the art we have today. As the logical consequence of the parabolic and hyperbolic arcs the hyperbolic parabolic shells were developed using traditional design techniques like models and orthogonal sections. Now we reach the point where the question comes up whether complex structures can be completely described by using traditional methods. A question that can be answered by "no" if we take the final step to the completely irregular geometry of cable- net-constructions or deconstructivistic designs. What we see - and what seems to support our thesis of the connection between design tools and the results of the design process - is, that on the one hand new tools enabled the designer to realize new ideas and on the other hand new ideas affected the development of new tools to realize them.

series eCAADe
more http://www.mediatecture.at/ecaade/91/ballheim_leppert.pdf
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 1c5c
authors Balmaceda, M.A., Deiana, S.M., Quiroga, G. and Toro, M.
year 1999
title Modelo Virtual Abierto de la Ciudad de San Juan (Open Virtual Model of the City of San Juan)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 470-474
summary The purpose of the present work is to virtually rebuild the city of san juan that was completely destroyed by an earthquake in 1944. From an audiovisual, multimedial approach, it tries to be a contribution to the recovering of the collective memory. Through virtual reality techniques, a three dimensional model of the city central area has been built, as it was before the earthquake. It has been achieved a multidisciplinary, open model that sums up a great deal of information and allows: 1.) From a pedagogic approach: an opened window to new ways of knowledgement transmission, through visual virtual information. The virtual rebuilt has been reconsidered as a pedagogic and communicational tool; 2.) From a historic and morphologic approach: to obtain multiple readings and to revolution the way to manage categories in different analysis scales; 3.) In the future, the model would allow the possibility of an unlimited improvement by working in different scales. Furthermore it would allow to add information, an so to increase the research area or to go deeper into details not only in the phenomenological dimension of the objects but also in their logic significant dimension.
series SIGRADI
email sudeiana@farqui.unsj.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 5cf4
id 5cf4
authors Barrionuevo, Luis F.
year 2004
title LOS "SPIROSPACES"
source Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference of Mathematics & Design, Special Edition of the Journal of Mathematics & Design, Volume 4, No.1, pp. 179-187.
summary This paper deals with “Spirospaces”. These are a conversion to the third dimension of the two dimensional geometric entities called “Spirolaterals”.

Abelson, Harold, diSessa and Andera (1968) gave the first rules concerning Spirolaterals. To obtain a Spirolateral from a set of straight lines, the first of them must be one unit long and the following must be incremented one unit at each step, at the same time that they turn in a constant direction. Odds (1973) establish the variation of the rotation direction, either to the left or the right. However, he did not give a mathematical relation able to calculate open Spirolaterals. Krawczyk (2001) developed a computer program that generates Spirolaterals following the method suggested by Abelson. These are Spirolaterals obtained by enumeration without a predictive mathematical formula. Krawczyc went farther proposing Spirolaterals based in curved lines. He pointed out that there are a variety of spirolateral forms that have architectural potentiality. Following this, the architectural potentiality of Spirolaterals is the basis of this paper.

To take advantage of that potentiality a computer program was implemented to generate spatial configurations based in Spirolaterals. When a third dimension is given to the Spirolaterals they become Spirospaces. These new entities need spatial and design parameters to be useful for architectural purposes. Barrionuevo and Borsetti (2001) gave results about that work establishing the concept of Spirospaces.

The aim of this paper is to describe a work directed to improve rules and procedures concerning Spirospaces. It is expected that these procedures governed by the proposed rules can be employed as tools during the early steps in the architectural design process.

In this work some aspects concerning Spirospaces are considered. First, Spirolaterals are presented as the predecessors of Spirospaces. Second, Spirospaces are defined, together with their structural parameters. Architectural modeling is studied at the light of two special elements of the Spirospaces: Interstitial spaces and Object spaces. Next, a computer program is presented as the appropriate tool to model configurations having architectural potentiality. Finally, the results obtained running the computer program are analyzed to determine their possible use as architectural forms. Several graphic illustrations are presented showing steps going from the exploration of spatial alternatives to the selection of a specific configuration to be developed.

It is expected that the described computer program could be employed as a design aid tool. As the operation of the program generates a variety of spaces able to dwell architectural objects, it eases the search of configurations suitable to specific functions. The results obtained have the possibility of being exported to computer graphic applications able to add materials, lights and cameras.

keywords Spirolaterals, Spirospaces, architectural spaces, interstitial spaces, objectual spaces
series other
type normal paper
email labsist@hotmail.com
last changed 2005/04/07 13:34

_id 4032
authors Barron, Christopher L.
year 1989
title 3-D Modelling
source architectural and Engineering Systems. April, 1989. [41] -56 unevenly numbered
summary From screen to structure, more and more AEs are finding design solutions in the third dimension. The author reviews current 3-D modeling systems, what are the expectations of the users and the developers goals
keywords architecture, practice, drafting, modeling, systems
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 21
authors Barroso, Jorge
year 1998
title Reflexiones Sobre la EnseÒanza de la Arquitectura, la Informatica e Internet (Reflections on the Teaching of the Architecture, Computing and the Internet)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 174-179
summary This paper proposes a reflection upon the teaching of architecture as seen from the actual practice of the profession within the context of the changes caused by the widespread use of computers and Internet in recent years. This proposal designates the present time as "semic revolution", superseding denominations like post industrial" or information revolution", emphasizing that the "mental prosthesis" created by man represents the highest degree of exploitation of his innerness as a "semic subject". A brief epistemological framework serves to lay the foundation for the concepts of imagination, creation, and design, differentiating the creator by his characteristic of requiring or not, semic mediation in order to reach his goals. The dominant use of new instruments which serve to represent and operate the "primary virtual object" giving priority to the comprehension and function of the new tool over the acquisition of information and ability to use it, is proposed when carried over to the field of application. The integration of internal networks through email strives not only to facilitate document transmission, exercises, group work, etc. but to understand the new dimension in the intellectual activities of man.
series SIGRADI
email jbarroso@movi.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id bd21
authors Barría Chateau, H., García Alvarado, R., Lagos Vergara, R. and Parra Márquez, J.C.
year 1999
title Evaluation of Spatial Perception in Virtual Environments
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 145-148
summary The 3D environments created by computers can be used as a powerful simulation tool for architecture, especially with inmersive devices, but it is necessary to know properly their spatial characteristics to use it effectively. It is also important to consider their possibilities in communication networks and their implications in contemporary architecture. For this reason, the goal of this research is to evaluate the perception of virtual architectonic spaces in relation to the perception of real architectonic spaces. This research is based on the comparison of experiences of university students in a real space (Entrance Hall of Faculty of Economy) and in the same space modeled by a computer. The evaluation considers tests with stereoscopic helmets and interactive navigation, making questionnaires to characterize the sensation of dimensions, relationships and time for an specific activity. The measuring of real and virtual spaces are made through references (furniture, textures, etc.) or by proportional relations between height, width and depth, in different patterns. The experience also reveals mental schemes to perceive the dimension of architectonic space and the orientation in a real and virtual environment. Besides, the research allows to relate the different levels of complexity and information with the understanding of real architectonic space and modeled space.
series SIGRADI
email rgarcia@pegsasus.dci.ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 2006_674
id 2006_674
authors Bates-Brkljac , Nada
year 2006
title Communicating urban development schemes through architectural representations - an investigation of perceptual responses
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 674-677
summary This paper presents the findings of a research project that investigates peoples’ perceptual responses to different forms of architectural representations as a means of communicating the proposed urban development schemes. By comparing traditional and computer-generated representations, the study aimed to establish whether some methods of architectural representation are perceived as more credible than others. Three concepts were used as the factors operating in credibility assessments, namely: accuracy, realism and abstraction. Analysis revealed significant differences in the assessed perceptions of representations’ accuracy and realism as contrasted with the four different forms of representation. The results relating to the concept of abstraction were chaotic and show highly polarized reactions to abstract representations that collapses the semantic space about a dominant single dimension.
keywords Architectural representations; mediated communication; perceived credibility; architects; professionals
series eCAADe
email Nada.Brkljac@uwe.ac.uk
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ddssar0206
id ddssar0206
authors Bax, M.F.Th. and Trum, H.M.G.J.
year 2002
title Faculties of Architecture
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary In order to be inscribed in the European Architect’s register the study program leading to the diploma ‘Architect’ has to meet the criteria of the EC Architect’s Directive (1985). The criteria are enumerated in 11 principles of Article 3 of the Directive. The Advisory Committee, established by the European Council got the task to examine such diplomas in the case some doubts are raised by other Member States. To carry out this task a matrix was designed, as an independent interpreting framework that mediates between the principles of Article 3 and the actual study program of a faculty. Such a tool was needed because of inconsistencies in the list of principles, differences between linguistic versions ofthe Directive, and quantification problems with time, devoted to the principles in the study programs. The core of the matrix, its headings, is a categorisation of the principles on a higher level of abstractionin the form of a taxonomy of domains and corresponding concepts. Filling in the matrix means that each study element of the study programs is analysed according to their content in terms of domains; thesummation of study time devoted to the various domains results in a so-called ‘profile of a faculty’. Judgement of that profile takes place by committee of peers. The domains of the taxonomy are intrinsically the same as the concepts and categories, needed for the description of an architectural design object: the faculties of architecture. This correspondence relates the taxonomy to the field of design theory and philosophy. The taxonomy is an application of Domain theory. This theory,developed by the authors since 1977, takes as a view that the architectural object only can be described fully as an integration of all types of domains. The theory supports the idea of a participatory andinterdisciplinary approach to design, which proved to be awarding both from a scientific and a social point of view. All types of domains have in common that they are measured in three dimensions: form, function and process, connecting the material aspects of the object with its social and proceduralaspects. In the taxonomy the function dimension is emphasised. It will be argued in the paper that the taxonomy is a categorisation following the pragmatistic philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce. It will bedemonstrated as well that the taxonomy is easy to handle by giving examples of its application in various countries in the last 5 years. The taxonomy proved to be an adequate tool for judgement ofstudy programs and their subsequent improvement, as constituted by the faculties of a Faculty of Architecture. The matrix is described as the result of theoretical reflection and practical application of a matrix, already in use since 1995. The major improvement of the matrix is its direct connection with Peirce’s universal categories and the self-explanatory character of its structure. The connection with Peirce’s categories gave the matrix a more universal character, which enables application in other fieldswhere the term ‘architecture’ is used as a metaphor for artefacts.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 96d8
id 96d8
authors Booth, Peter; Loo, Stephen
year 2009
title Beyond Equilibrium: Sustainable Digital Design
source Sustainable theory/ theorizing sustainability Proceedings from the 5th International Conference of the Association of Architecture Victoria University, New Zealand, 4-5 September 2009
summary Implicit in current understandings of sustainability is the presence of a closed system with the capacity of equilibration. Sustainable practices, including design practices, are therefore assumed to possess a redemptive role: design is deployed (as environmentally sustainable design, etc.) to change habits, develop new technologies and recover marginalized practices in the hope of righting the balance between the environment and human endeavours.

Recent developments in experimental digital design have demonstrated non‐linear and highly complex relations between topological transformations, material change, and the temporal dimension of forces. More importantly, this method of design is bottom‐up, because it does not rely on design solutions presaged by conventions, or restricted by representation, but is emergent within the performance of computational design itself. We argue that digital design processes need to move beyond the flux of determinates and solutions in equilibrium, towards a radically continuous but consistent production, which is in effect, an expression of sustainable pedagogy.

The role of emergent digital techniques has significant impact on the methods in which computation is utilized within both practice and academic environments. This paper outlines a digital design studio on sustainability at the University of Tasmania, Australia that uses parametric modelling, digital performance testing, and topological morphology, concomitant with actual material fabrication, as a potent mode of collaborative design studio practice towards a sustainable design pedagogy.

keywords digital, computation, process, morphogenesis.
series other
type normal paper
email peter.booth@utas.edu.au
last changed 2009/09/08 21:21

_id cabb
authors Broughton, T., Tan, A. and Coates, P.S.
year 1997
title The Use of Genetic Programming In Exploring 3D Design Worlds - A Report of Two Projects by Msc Students at CECA UEL
source CAAD Futures 1997 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-7923-4726-9] München (Germany), 4-6 August 1997, pp. 885-915
summary Genetic algorithms are used to evolve rule systems for a generative process, in one case a shape grammar,which uses the "Dawkins Biomorph" paradigm of user driven choices to perform artificial selection, in the other a CA/Lindenmeyer system using the Hausdorff dimension of the resultant configuration to drive natural selection. (1) Using Genetic Programming in an interactive 3D shape grammar. A report of a generative system combining genetic programming (GP) and 3D shape grammars. The reasoning that backs up the basis for this work depends on the interpretation of design as search In this system, a 3D form is a computer program made up of functions (transformations) & terminals (building blocks). Each program evaluates into a structure. Hence, in this instance a program is synonymous with form. Building blocks of form are platonic solids (box, cylinder, etc.). A Variety of combinations of the simple affine transformations of translation, scaling, rotation together with Boolean operations of union, subtraction and intersection performed on the building blocks generate different configurations of 3D forms. Using to the methodology of genetic programming, an initial population of such programs are randomly generated,subjected to a test for fitness (the eyeball test). Individual programs that have passed the test are selected to be parents for reproducing the next generation of programs via the process of recombination. (2) Using a GA to evolve rule sets to achieve a goal configuration. The aim of these experiments was to build a framework in which a structure's form could be defined by a set of instructions encoded into its genetic make-up. This was achieved by combining a generative rule system commonly used to model biological growth with a genetic algorithm simulating the evolutionary process of selection to evolve an adaptive rule system capable of replicating any preselected 3D shape. The generative modelling technique used is a string rewriting Lindenmayer system the genes of the emergent structures are the production rules of the L-system, and the spatial representation of the structures uses the geometry of iso-spatial dense-packed spheres
series CAAD Futures
email p.s.coates@btinternet.com
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

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