CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 11 of 11

_id 7555
authors Brown, F., Cooper, G., Ford, S., Aouad, G., Brandon, P., Child, T., Kirkham, J., Oxman, R. and Young, B.
year 1995
title An integrated approach to CAD: modelling concepts in building design and construction
source Design Studies 16 (3) (1995) pp. 327-347
summary The ICON project is concerned with the creation of a generic information structure for the construction industry. A central feature of the information model is the use of object-oriented modelling techniques to allow information to be viewed from different 'perspectives' and at different levels of abstraction, according to the requirements of the user. This paper discusses the object modelling of concepts and information in the design area. Drawing on knowledge elicited from protocol analysis of the design activity, a series of interrelated object models has been developed, reflecting different perspectives and abstraction levels within the design domain. Three of these models (spatial design, physical design and structural design) are presented and their implications for the communication and sharing of information discussed.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id 940c
authors Brown, F.E. (et. al.)
year 1995
title An integrated approach to CAD: modelling concepts in building design and construction
source Design Studies, vol. 16
summary The ICON project is concerned with the creation of a generic information structure for the construction industry. A central feature of the information model is the use of object-oriented modelling techniques to allow information to be viewed from different `perspectives' and at different levels of abstraction, according to the requirements of the user. This paper discusses the object modelling of concepts and information in the design area. Drawing on knowledge elicited from protocol analysis of the design activity, a series of interrelated object models has been developed, reflecting different perspectives and abstraction levels within the design domain. Three of these models (spatial design, physical design and structural design) are presented and their implications for the communication and sharing of information discussed.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id cf2019_016
id cf2019_016
authors Cardoso Llach, Daniel and Scott Donaldson
year 2019
title An Experimental Archaeology of CAD Using Software Reconstruction to Explore the Past and Future of ComputerAided Design
source Ji-Hyun Lee (Eds.) "Hello, Culture!"  [18th International Conference, CAAD Futures 2019, Proceedings / ISBN 978-89-89453-05-5] Daejeon, Korea, p. 130
summary This paper proposes software reconstruction as a method to shed new light into the material, gestural, and sensual dimensions of computer-aided design technologies. Specifically, it shows how by combining historical research and creative prototyping this method can bring us closer to distant ways of seeing, touching, drawing, and designing—while raising new questions about the impact of CAD technologies on present-day architectural practices. It documents the development of two software reconstructions—of Ivan Sutherland’s “Sketchpad” and of Steven A. Coons’s “Coons Patch”—and reflects on the responses they elicited in the context of two exhibitions. The paper shows how software reconstruction can offer access to overlooked aspects of computer-aided design systems, specially their material and sensual dimensions, and how we may explore its broader potential for research, preservation, pedagogy, and speculative design of design technologies.
keywords Software Reconstruction, Media Archaeology, CAD, Sketchpad, Steven A. Coons, Ivan Sutherland, Computational Design History
series CAAD Futures
email dcardoso@cmu.edu
last changed 2019/07/29 12:08

_id cf2019_042
id cf2019_042
authors Khan, Sumbul; Bige Tuncer, Ramanathan Subramanian and Lucienne Blessing
year 2019
title 3D CAD modeling using gestures and speech: Investigating CAD legacy and non-legacy procedures
source Ji-Hyun Lee (Eds.) "Hello, Culture!"  [18th International Conference, CAAD Futures 2019, Proceedings / ISBN 978-89-89453-05-5] Daejeon, Korea, pp. 347-366
summary 3D CAD modeling using natural interaction techniques necessitates greater research into the modeling procedures employed by users. In a previously conducted experiment, we elicited speech and gestures input for 3D CAD modeling tasks for conceptual design. In this paper, we examine the 3D modeling procedures articulated by the participants, using gestures and speech, for creating basic 3D models of increasing complexity. We identified 3D modeling procedures and characterized them as CAD legacy and non-legacy procedures. Results show that (1) non-legacy procedures were employed by a considerable number of participants who had fair and high proficiency in CAD and (2) Non-legacy procedures with fewer steps were rated favorably by participants. Based on the results, we provide recommendations on key aspects of non-legacy procedures that need to be incorporated in CAD modeling programs to facilitate speech and gestural input.
keywords Gestures, 3D CAD modeling, Human Computer Interaction, computer aided design, natural interaction
series CAAD Futures
email sumbul_khan@sutd.edu.sg
last changed 2019/07/29 12:15

_id acadia17_318
id acadia17_318
authors Khan, Sumbul; Tunçer, Bige
year 2017
title Intuitive and Effective Gestures for Conceptual Architectural Design: An Analysis Of User Elicited Hand Gestures For 3D CAD Modeling
source ACADIA 2017: DISCIPLINES & DISRUPTION [Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-96506-1] Cambridge, MA 2-4 November, 2017), pp. 318- 323
summary Gesture-based natural interfaces necessitate research into gestures that are intuitive for designers and effective for natural interaction. Intuitive knowledge is significant for conceptual design as it reduces time taken to complete tasks and improves usability of products. In a previously conducted experiment, we elicited gestures for 3D CAD modeling tasks for conceptual architectural design. In this study, we present a preliminary analysis of intuitiveness scores of gestures and evaluators’ ratings to analyze which gestures were more intuitive and effective for CAD manipulation tasks. Results show that gestures with high intuitive scores were not necessarily rated as effective by evaluators and that bimanual symmetric gestures consistently scored high for both intuitiveness and effectiveness. Based on our findings we give recommendations for the design of gesture-based CAD modeling systems for single and multiple users.
keywords design methods; information processing; HCI; collaboration; art and technology
series ACADIA
email sumbul_khan@sutd.edu.sg
last changed 2017/10/17 09:12

_id ascaad2007_040
id ascaad2007_040
authors Loemker, T.M.
year 2007
title Location Based Services in Revitalization: The Use of Commonly Available Techniques for a Client-Participation Model
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 505-516
summary This research concentrates on the combination of remote sensing devices, georeferenced data, web-based optimization techniques and Location Based Services in revitalization. Its aim is to enhance the delivery of information about the development potentialities of existing buildings. The present and idle stock of buildings is extensive. Nonetheless, significant data and information about existing buildings is hardly available. The real estate owners are usually not known by prospective clients and they can be elicited only with substantial effort. But even if data about a building is available it is difficult to valuate it precisely, because of missing standard classification techniques. The question whether or not a building is suitable for a certain subsequent use is therefore hard to answer. It involves an extensive expenditure of time and manpower. Recent publications however, demonstrate that requests for the re-use of buildings can be solved through the use of combinatorial optimization techniques (Loemker 2006a, 2006b, 2007). Within these approaches researchers mainly concentrate on the architect dealing with inquiries from clients. These inquiries typically address the question if specific buildings are suitable for particular future uses. With the aid of optimization engines the architect can solve these requests through a description of the existing buildings and the corresponding enquiries in terms of specific criteria such as number and size of rooms or adjacency between rooms. According to an unambiguous syntax these approaches can be applied to any building type. The building data is stored in databases which can be inquired through optimization engines which thereupon calculate suitable solutions to the demands made by the client. But even if these approaches demonstrate high potential, their bottleneck lies in the exclusive use through the architect. Neither can they be addressed to buildings that are not listed in the architects own inventory listings nor can they be used by the clients themselves. Furthermore, no reliable statement about a prospective reuse of a building can be made directly on site by prospective clients, i.e. buyers or renters. In our research we examined if ad-hoc analyses of existing buildings can be accomplished through the clients themselves with the aid of Location Based Services that can be accessed by common remote sensing devices. The aim is to give prospective clients the possibility to visit a building and run in-situ usability simulations. To accomplish this, building data will be transferred between the building and the client through the use of ordinary communication devices. These devices automatically connect to server-based applications, which compare the requirements of the client with the existing building and run remote simulations on concrete further utilization. The newly generated information will then be passed back to the client’s device. In the paper we address a scenario of a prospective client who visits a city where he hits on an unused building he might be interest in. The client wishes to gain immediate and accurate information if the building is able to meet his demands regarding the space needed for his company. Different techniques investigated, their assets and drawbacks will be described that could accomplish suchlike tasks.
series ASCAAD
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id ecaade2007_111
id ecaade2007_111
authors Lömker, Thorsten M.
year 2007
title Location-Based Optimization to Foster Economic Decision-Making in Revitalization
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 311-317
summary The existent and idle stock of buildings is extensive. However, significant information about these buildings is hardly available. The real estate owners are usually not known by prospective customers and they can be elicited only with substantial effort. But even if data about a building is available, it is difficult to valuate it precisely, because there are no standard classification techniques available, which would also consider the subjective subsequent requirements of the interested parties. The question whether a building is suitable for a certain subsequent use is therefore hard to answer. It involves an extensive expenditure of time and manpower. No reliable statement about a prospective reuse of a building can be made on site by prospective clients, i.e. buyers or renters. Therefore, we examined the technology needed by the customer to accomplish in-situ ad-hoc analyses of existing buildings. These technologies are namely remote sensing devices using georeferenced data, Location-Based Services and web-based optimization techniques. The aim is to give prospective clients the possibility to visit a building and run an in-situ usability simulation. To accomplish this, building information will be transferred between the building and the client through the use of common communication devices. These devices automatically connect to server-based applications, which compare the requirements of the prospective customer with the existing building and run remote simulations on concrete further utilization. By the use of georeferenced data alternative locations of unused buildings can be integrated into the simulation as well.
keywords Revitalization, location-based services, ubiquitous computing, web-based optimization
series eCAADe
email thorsten.loemker@tu-dresden.de
last changed 2007/11/27 07:22

_id 9eb6
authors Peng C. and Blundell Jones, P.
year 1999
title Hypermedia Authoring and Contextual Modeling in Architecture and Urban Design: Collaborative Reconstructing Historical Sheffield
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 114-124
summary Studies of historical architecture and urban contexts in preparation for contemporary design interventions are inherently rich in information, demanding versatile and efficient methods of documentation and retrieval. We report on a developing program to establish a hypermedia authoring approach to collaborative contextual modeling in architecture and urban design. The paper begins with a description of a large-scale urban history study project in which 95 students jointly built a physical model of the city center of Sheffield as it stood in 1900, at a scale of 1:500. Continuing work on the Sheffield urban study project, it appears to us desirable to adopt a digital approach to archiving the material and in making it both indexible and accessible via multiple routes. In our review of digital models of cities, some interesting yet unexplored issues were identified. Given the issues and tasks elicited, we investigated hypermedia authoring in HTML and VRML as a designer-centered modeling methodology. Conceptual clarity of the methodology was considered, intending that an individual or members of design groups with reasonable computing skills could learn to operate it quickly. The methodology shows that it is practicable to build a digital contextual databank by a group of architecture/urban designers rather than by specialized modeling teams. Contextual modeling with or without computers can be a research activity on its own. However, we intend to investigate further how hypermedia-based contextual models can be interrelated to design development and communication. We discuss three aspects that can be explored in a design education setting.
series ACADIA
email c.peng@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id diss_prothero
id diss_prothero
authors Prothero, Jerrold D.
year 1998
title The Role of Rest Frames in Vection, Presence and Motion Sickness
source University of Washington, HIT-Lab
summary A framework is presented for comprehending partly participants' spatial percep- tion in virtual environments. Speci c hypotheses derived from that framework in- clude: simulator sickness should be reducible through visual background manipula- tions; and the sense of presence, or of \being in" a virtual environment, should be increased by manipulations that facilitate perception of a virtual scene as a perceptual rest frame. Experiments to assess the simulator sickness reduction hypothesis demon- strated that congruence between the visual background and inertial cues decreased reported simulator sickness and per-exposure postural instability. Experiments to assess the presence hypothesis used two measures: self-reported presence and visual- inertial nulling. Results indicated that a meaningful virtual scene, as opposed to a random one, increased both reported presence and the level of inertial motion re- quired to overcome perceived self-motion elicited by scene motion. The simulator sickness research implies that visual background manipulations may be a means to reduce the prevalent unwanted side-e ects of simulators. The presence research intro- duces a procedure, possibly based on brain-stem level neural processing, to measure the salience of virtual environments. Both lines of research are central to developing e ective virtual interfaces which have the potential to increase the human-computer bandwidth, and thus to partially address the information explosion.
series thesis:MSc
more http://www.hitl.washington.edu/publications/r-98-11/
last changed 2003/11/28 06:35

_id ddssar9625
id ddssar9625
authors Sanui, Junichiro
year 1996
title Visualization of users' requirements: Introduction of the Evaluation Grid Method
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary During the last decade, a new type of approaches have emerged in Japanese environmental psychology. These approaches have characteristics that they are aiming to clarify users' requirements for the environment as the design questions to be solved, compared with the traditional approaches aiming to clarify the environment-human relationship to provide actual design solutions. As an example of these new approaches, the Evaluation Grid Method (EGM), a semi-structured interview method developed by the author based on Kelly's Personal Construct Theory is introduced. In the EGM, by asking the reasons of why an environment is more preferable to others recurrently, together with leading questions (laddering), each participant's requirements to the environment are elicited structurally as well as phenomenologically. Also by cumulating each participant's requirements, the extensive structure of the requirements to the environment embraced by people is produced. In this paper, a detailed procedure and the outcome of the EGM are presented on the elicitation of workers' requirements for the office environment. Also recent applied examples where the EGM research was applied as an design aid in architectural as well as industrial field will be introduced.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddssar0031
id ddssar0031
authors Witt, Tom
year 2000
title Indecision in quest of design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary Designers all start with a solution (Darke, 1984), with what is known (Rittel, 1969, 1970). Hans Menghol, Svein Gusrud and Peter Opvik did so with the chair in the 1970s. Not content with the knowledge of the chair, however, they walked backward to the ignorance of the question that has always elicited the solution of chair and asked themselves the improbable question, “What is a chair?” Their answer was the Balans chair. “Until the introduction of the Norwegian Balans (balance) chair, the multi-billion dollar international chair industry had been surprisingly homogeneous. This chair is the most radical of the twentieth century and probably since the invention of the chair-throne itself (Cranz 1998). Design theorists have tried to understand in a measurable way what is not measurable: the way that designers think. Rather than attempt to analyze something that cannot be taken apart, I attempt to illuminate methods for generating new knowledge through ways of seeing connections that are not logical, and in fact are sometimes ironic. Among the possibilities discussed in this dialogue are the methodological power of language in the form of metaphor, the power of the imagination in mind experiments, the power of mythological story telling, and the power of immeasurable intangibles in the generation of the new knowledge needed to design.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

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