CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id acadia13_025
id acadia13_025
authors Cordero Maisonet, Sixto; Smith, Austin
year 2013
title Responsive Expansion
source ACADIA 13: Adaptive Architecture [Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-926724-22-5] Cambridge 24-26 October, 2013), pp. 25-32
summary Although commonly considered problematic within the wider range of standardized isotropic construction materials, wood’s mechanical deficiencies are simultaneously an asset for the adventurous designer. These anisotropic and organic characteristics can be critically investigated, even exaggerated, with the possibility of productively yielding a complex and adaptive building material.Given wood’s fibrous make-up, as derived from its ecological function as an evaporative capillary system, wood as a material is predisposed to react to environmental and contextual fluctuations—moisture in particular. As a consequence of its cellular and chemical anatomy, wood—unlike other standard construction materials—will morphologically react to changes in moisture. This reactivity is derived from interactions such as rehydration and swelling at the cellular level which accumulate to induce formal transformations at the macro level. This responsiveness, when coupled with the affordances of industrial standardization, reframes wood within architecture as a reactive material capable of consistent transformation well-suited to parametric definition within computational modeling.
keywords Complex Systems: complex, adaptive, expansion, wood, material investigation, emergent and self-organizing systems
series ACADIA
type Normal Paper
email sacm@mit.edu
last changed 2014/01/11 08:13

_id 9824
authors Etzion, Y., Pearlmutter, D., Erell, E. and Meir, I.A.
year 1997
title Adaptive architecture: integrating low-energy technologies for climate control in the desert
source Automation in Construction 6 (5-6) (1997) pp. 417-425
summary The article describes a `climatically adaptive' approach to intelligent building in which a variety of technologies are integrated in the architectural design to provide thermal comfort with a minimal expenditure of energy. This concept is illustrated by the design of the Blaustein International Center for Desert Studies, a multi-use complex completed recently at the Sede-Boker Campus of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. In response to the local climate of this desert region, a number of strategies were developed by the authors to exploit natural energy for heating and cooling: earth berming of major parts of the building, 'selective glazing' for seasonal shading and energy collection, a down-draft 'cool-tower' for evaporative cooling and a hybrid mechanism for hot-air supply are several of the unique systems whose performance and feasibility are analyzed within the context of the overall building design.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id acadia08_208
id acadia08_208
authors Griffiths, Jason
year 2008
title Man + Water + Fan = Freshman: Natural Process of Evaporative Cooling and the Digital Fabrication of the ASU Outdoor Dining Pavilion
source Silicon + Skin: Biological Processes and Computation, [Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) / ISBN 978-0-9789463-4-0] Minneapolis 16-19 October 2008, 208-213
summary To the east of Johnson City TX is the Lyndon B. Johnson’s family home. Part of the Johnson Estate2 is given over to a working farm circa 1870 that presents various aspects of domestic practice from the era. This includes a desert fridge which is a simple four-legged structure with a slightly battered profile that’s draped in calico. Its principle is simple; water from an upturned jar is drawn by osmosis down the sides of the calico where it evaporates in wind currents drawn though a “dog run” between two log cabins. Cooled air circulates within the structure and where cheese and milk are kept fresh during the summer. The desert fridge is a simple system that reaches a state of equilibrium through the natural process of evaporation. ¶ This system provides a working model for a prototype structure for an outdoor dining pavilion that was designed and constructed on the campus of Arizona State University. The desert fridge is the basis for a “biological process”3 of evaporative cooling that has been interpreted in terms a ritual of outdoor dining in arid climates. The pavilion is intended as a gathering point and a place of interaction for ASU freshmen. The long-term aim of this project is to provide a multiple of these pavilions across the campus that will be the locus of a sequence of dining events over a “dining season”4 during the fall and spring semester. ; This paper describes how the desert fridge principle has been interpreted in the program and construction of the dining pavilion. It explores a sequence of levels by which the structure, via digital production process, provides an educational narrative on sustainability. This communicative quality is portrayed by the building in direct biological terms, through tacit knowledge, perceived phenomena, lexical and mechanical systems. The paper also describes how these digital production process were used in the building’s design and fabrication. These range from an empirical prognosis of evaporative cooling effects, fluid dynamics, heat mapping and solar radiation analysis through to sheet steel laser cutting, folded plate construction and fully associative variable models of standard steel construction. The aim of the pavilion is to create an environment that presents the evaporative cooling message at a multiple of levels that will concentrate the visitor in holistic understanding of the processes imbued within the building.5
keywords Communication; Digital Fabrication; Environment; System
series ACADIA
last changed 2009/02/26 07:39

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