CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 436

_id ijac201210203
id ijac201210203
authors Abdelhameed, Wael A.
year 2012
title Micro-Simulation Function to Display Textual Data in Virtual Reality
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 10 - no. 2, 205-218
summary Virtual reality creates an effective communication platform with a high degree of perception and exploration, increasing the benefits of VR applied functions.This research paper reports a virtual reality function of using the micro-simulation editor-player with XML file in the virtual reality environment.The details of the function are presented.The function aiming at combining visual and textual data in VR model visualisation, was developed by the researcher, and was included in the micro-simulation plug-in of a virtual reality program,VR Studio version 6, previously known as UC-Win/Road, by the program developers.The research paper discusses the computer simulation techniques and uses in virtual reality in general.The research paper proceeds to introduce a case study of construction process visualization in the virtual reality environment, in which the newly developed function is utilized to simultaneously visualise data reports related to the stages of VR model visualisation.The concluding remarks accentuate this micro-simulation function with its potential uses in different fields.
keywords Micro-Simulation, XML,Virtual Reality, Construction Process Visualisation
series journal
last changed 2019/05/24 07:55

_id ascaad2010_241
id ascaad2010_241
authors Aboreeda, Faten; Dina Taha
year 2010
title Using Case-Based Reasoning to Aid Sustainable Design
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 241-246
summary Since so far there exists only one planet, sustainable design is considered the (ethical) future in all fields of design. Although both architecture and construction are being considered major emitters of green house gases, a wise design not only can lead to minimizing this impact but it can also lead to restoring and regenerating the environment to a sustainable state. This paper presents an on-going research that aims at simplifying the elements and facilitating the process of sustainable design by using case-based reasoning. This is achieved through learning from past experiences; both good and bad ones, by providing a database application with a process-friendly interface which divides the main pillars of sustainable design into categories. Each building contains different stories related to different sustainable related issues. Each story can be repeated in /linked to many buildings. By providing designers with those past experiences, it is believed that deeper-studied designs can be more easily developed. Also a deeper analysis and understanding can be further implemented and produced with less effort for experienced and non-experienced architects in sustainable design. This would also decrease the consumption of time during the design process and encourage even more designers to integrate the sustainability concept into more designs. This research discusses the influence of sustainable design within the architectural domain, and suggests a computer application that aids architects during the preliminary design processes.
series ASCAAD
email fatenaboreeda@gmail.com
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id 6208
authors Abou-Jaoude, Georges
year 1992
title To Master a Tool
source Proceedings of the 4rd European Full-Scale Modelling Conference / Lausanne (Switzerland) 9-12 September 1992, Part B, p. 15
summary The tool here is the computer or to be precise, a unit that includes the computer, the peripherals and the software needed to fulfill a task. These tools are getting very sophisticated and user interfaces extremly friendly, therefore it is very easy to become the slave of such electronic tools and reach self satisfaction with strait forward results and attractive images. In order to master and not to become slaves of sophisticated tools, a very solid knowledge of related fields or domains of application becomes necessary. In the case of this seminar, full scale modelling, is a way to understand the relation between a mental model and it's full-scale modelling, it is a way of communicating what is in a designers mind. Computers and design programs can have the same goal, rather than chosing one method or the other let us try to say how important it is today to complement designing with computer with other means and media such as full scale modelling, and what computer modelling and simulation can bring to full scale modelling or other means.
keywords Full-scale Modeling, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2003/08/25 08:12

_id 9c0c
authors Af Klercker, Jonas and HenrichsÈn, Jan
year 2001
title Can simulations in VE support architects in solving complex design problems?
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 77-82 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary Building design is facing development of industrialization of the production on the one hand and more complex 'One of a Kind' products on the other. This will be for rebuilding of a large stock of existing buildings and what can be left to new production. In both cases the results of the design process have to be solid to guarantee a successful product. In both cases an integrated and careful design process is absolutely crucial. The demands on the built environment make the systems of buildings more and more complex and have to be handled by a lot of different expertise. To avoid the 'Relay Race' of today the design teams of tomorrow must work much more integrated. To make integrated solutions, which means simultaneous constrains on all systems, the experts of different fields have to understand more of how all engaged systems relate and influence each other. Communication then consists of complex situations and processes that have to be understood and related to reality. In this aspect a multidimensional Virtual Environment interface has advantages and has been successfully used in design processes in other industries. In this paper the problems that have to be studied are for example Methodical, Conceptual, Technical and Process economical.
series other
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id ae61
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1999
title CAAD - Integrated with the First Steps into Architecture
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 266-272
summary How and when should CAAD be introduced in the curriculum of the School of Architecture? This paper begins with some arguments for starting CAAD education at the very beginning. At the School of Architecture in Lund teachers in the first year courses have tried to integrate CAAD with the introduction to architectural concepts and techniques. Traditionally the first year is divided by several subjects running courses separatly without any contact for coordination. From the academic year 96/97 the teachers of Aplied aestetics, Building Science, Architectural design and CAAD have decided to colaborate as much as possible to make the role of our different fields as clear as possible to the students. Therefore integrating CAAD was a natural step in the academic year 98/99. The computer techniques were taught one step in advance so that the students can practise their understanding of the programs in their tasks in the other subjects. The results were surprisingly good! The students have quickly learned to mix the manual and computer techniques to make expressive and interesting visual presentations of their ideas. Some students with antipaty to computers have overcome this handicap. Some interesting observations are discussed.
keywords Curriculum, First Year Studies, Integration, CAAD, Modelling
series eCAADe
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id acadia15_263
id acadia15_263
authors Ahlquist, Sean
year 2015
title Social Sensory Architectures: Articulating Textile Hybrid Structures for Multi-Sensory Responsiveness and Collaborative Play
source ACADIA 2105: Computational Ecologies: Design in the Anthropocene [Proceedings of the 35th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-53726-8] Cincinnati 19-25 October, 2015), pp. 263-273
summary This paper describes the development of the StretchPLAY prototype as a part of the Social Sensory Surfaces research project, focusing on the design of tactile and responsive environments for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The project is directed specifically at issues with sensory processing, the inability of the nervous system to filter sensory input in order to indicate an appropriate response. This can be referred to as a “traffic jam” of sensory data where the intensity of such unfiltered information leads to an over-intensified sensory experience, and ultimately a dis-regulated state. To create a sensory regulating environments, a tactile structure is developed integrating physical, visual and auditory feedback. The structure is defined as a textile hybrid system integrating a seamless knitted textile to form a continuous topologically complex surface. Advancements in the fabrication of the boundary structure, of glass-fiber reinforced rods, enable the form to be more robustly structured than previous examples of textile hybrid or tent-like structures. The tensioned textile is activated as a tangible interface where sensing of touch and pressure on the surface triggers ranges of visual and auditory response. A specific child, a five-year old girl with ASD, is studied in order to tailor the technologies as a response to her sensory challenges. This project is a collaboration with students, researchers and faculty in the fields of architecture, computer science, information (human-computer interaction), music and civil engineering, along with practitioners in the field of ASD-based therapies.
keywords Textile Hybrid, Knitting, Sensory Environment, Tangible Interface, Responsive systems and environments
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email ahlquist@umich.edu
last changed 2016/08/05 11:37

_id b0e7
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E. and Karboulonis, P.
year 2000
title The Re-Convergence of Art and Science: A Vehicle for Creativity
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 491-500
summary Ever-increasing complexity in product design and the need to deliver a cost-effective solution that benefits from a dynamic approach requires the employment and adoption of innovative design methods which ensure that products are of the highest quality and meet or exceed customers' expectations. According to Bronowski (1976) science and art were originally two faces of the same human creativity. However, as civilisation advances and works became specialised, the dichotomy of science and art gradually became apparent. Hence scientists and artists were born, and began to develop work that was polar opposite. The sense of beauty itself became separated from science and was confined within the field of art. This dichotomy existed through mankind's efforts in advancing civilisation to its present state. This paper briefly examines the relationship between art and science through the ages and discusses their relatively recent re-convergence. Based on this hypothesis, this paper studies the current state of the convergence between arts and sciences and examines the current relationship between the two by considering real world applications and products. The study of such products and their successes and impact they had in the marketplace due to their designs and aesthetics rather than their advanced technology that had partially failed them appears to support this argument. This text further argues that a re-convergence between art and science is currently occurring and highlights the need for accelerating this process. It is suggested that re-convergence is a result of new technologies which are adopted by practitioners that include effective visualisation and communication of ideas and concepts. Such elements are widely found today in multimedia and Virtual Environments (VEs) where such tools offer increased power and new abilities to both scientists and designers as both venture in each other's domains. This paper highlights the need for the employment of emerging computer based real-time interactive technologies that are expected to enhance the design process through real-time prototyping and visualisation, better decision-making, higher quality communication and collaboration, lessor error and reduced design cycles. Effective employment and adoption of innovative design methods that ensure products are delivered on time, and within budget, are of the highest quality and meet customer expectations are becoming of ever increasing importance. Such tools and concepts are outlined and their roles in the industries they currently serve are identified. Case studies from differing fields are also studied. It is also suggested that Virtual Reality interfaces should be used and given access to Computer Aided Design (CAD) model information and data so that users may interrogate virtual models for additional information and functionality. Adoption and appliance of such integrated technologies over the Internet and their relevance to electronic commerce is also discussed. Finally, emerging software and hardware technologies are outlined and case studies from the architecture, electronic games, and retail industries among others are discussed, the benefits are subsequently put forward to support the argument. The requirements for adopting such technologies in financial, skills required and process management terms are also considered and outlined.
series CAADRIA
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my, karboulonis@clara.co.uk
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ascaad2016_052
id ascaad2016_052
authors Al-Badry, Sally; Cesar Cheng, Sebastian Lundberg and Georgios Berdos
year 2016
title Living on the Edge - Reinventing the amphibiotic habitat of the Mesopotamian Marshlands
source Parametricism Vs. Materialism: Evolution of Digital Technologies for Development [8th ASCAAD Conference Proceedings ISBN 978-0-9955691-0-2] London (United Kingdom) 7-8 November 2016, pp. 513-526
summary The Mesopotamian Marshlands form one of the first landscapes where people started to transform and manipulate the natural environment in order to sustain human habitation. For thousands of years, people have transformed natural ecosystems into agricultural fields, residential clusters and other agglomerated environments to sustain long-term settlement. In this way, the development of human society has been intricately linked to the extraction, processing and consumption of natural resources. The Mesopotamian Marshlands, located in one of the hottest and most arid areas on the planet, formed a unique wetlands ecosystem, which apart from millions of people, sustained a very high number of wildlife and endemic species. Several historical, political, social and climatic changes, which densely occurred during the past century, completely destroyed the unique civilisation of the area, made all the wild flora and fauna disappear and forced hundreds of thousands of people to migrate. During the last decade, many efforts have been made to restore the marshlands. However, these efforts are lacking a comprehensive design strategy, coherent goals and deep understanding of the complex current geopolitical situation, making the restoration process an extremely difficult task. This work aims at providing strategies for recovering the Mesopotamian Marshlands, organising productive functions in order to sustain the local population and design a new inhabitation model, using advanced computational tools while taking into account the extreme climatic conditions and several unique cultural aspects. Part of the aim of this work is to advance the use of computation and explore the opportunities that digital tools afford in helping find solutions to complex design problems where various design variables need to be coordinated to satisfy the design goals. Today, advanced computation enables designers to use population consumption demands, ecological processes and environmental inputs as design parameters to develop more robust and resilient regional planning strategies. This work has the double aim of first, presenting a framework for re-inhabiting the Marshlands of Mesopotamia. Second, the work suggests a design methodology based on computer-aided design for developing and organising productive functions and patterns of human occupation in wetland environments.
series ASCAAD
email sally.al-badry@aaschool.ac.uk
last changed 2017/05/25 11:34

_id sigradi2017_016
id sigradi2017_016
authors Alexandre da Silva, Geovany Jessé; Carlos Alejandro Nome, Lucy Donegan
year 2017
title Ferramentas de Projeto para análise da qualidade urbana: Relacionando forma, usos, densidade e configuração espacial na cidade de João Pessoa, Brasil. [Design tools to assess urban quality: Relating form, uses, density and spatial configuration in João Pessoa city, Brazil.]
source SIGraDi 2017 [Proceedings of the 21th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-956-227-439-5] Chile, Concepción 22 - 24 November 2017, pp.123-129
summary This paper describes an experience in a Graduate course Architecture and Urbanism that used computational tools to analyze urban quality – considering form, uses, density and spatial configuration (based on visual and fields) – in different urban areas in the city of João Pessoa. Understanding that the city is a problem in organized complexity, different aspects condition the quality of use of spaces and reveal urban dynamics. Urban analysis aided by computational tools revealed successful in characterizing different problems and potentialities that can lay the foundation for interventions with more urban quality.
keywords Design computational tools; Study of urban form, uses and density; Urban space performance; Spatial configuration.
series SIGraDi
email galexarq.ufpb@gmail.com
last changed 2018/07/27 08:05

_id sigradi2018_1535
id sigradi2018_1535
authors Almeida, Caio; Brandão, Guilherme; Lima, Fernando; Borges, Marcos
year 2018
title Spatial Proxemics: experiments and contributions of anthropological relationships in digital media
source SIGraDi 2018 [Proceedings of the 22nd Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISSN: 2318-6968] Brazil, São Carlos 7 - 9 November 2018, pp. 1279-1284
summary Proxemics was first defined by Edward. T. Hall as being the relations between non-verbal communications in a determined space. This paper aims to promote a theoretical interpolation between diverse study fields with new contemporary urbanism paradigms supported by technology and anthropological relations. In this optics, to provide a better understanding of possible characteristics within the proxemics theory can translate into a better spatial understanding and city improvement from an analysis methodology using digital tools.
keywords Proxemics; Architecture; Urbanism; Phenomenology; Digital space
series SIGraDi
email caioaugusto.arq@gmail.com
last changed 2019/05/20 09:13

_id 40fc
authors Alonso, Marcelo and Finn, Edward J.
year 1971
title Physics
source 760 p. : ill Reading, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co., 1971. Includes index.
summary This book, designed for a two-semester general physics course for science and engineering students, presents a logical and unified approach emphasizing the conservation laws, the concepts of fields and waves, and the atomic view of matter. The special theory of relativity, in its more basic aspects, is used throughout the text as one of the guiding principles that must be met by any physical theory
keywords physics, mathematics
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id a927
authors Amirante, Isabella and Bosco, Antonio
year 1995
title Hypertext Between Research and Teaching: An Experience in a Didactic Building Technology Laboratory
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 3-12
summary IPER (hypertext for the knowledge of building patrimony) is the result of a research developed with C.N.R. (National Research Institute). The aim of IPER is to provide the knowledge, the description and the management of one or more historical buildings for public or private institutions. IPER allowed us to improve our methodology of building analysis, covering various disciplinary fields, in two different systems. (1.) the first one, synthetic and suitable for a group of historical buildings, (2.) the second one, complex and particularly made for monumental buildings. // This experience is related to the new regulation of teaching architecture in Italy made in 1993. The main novelty is the introduction of the laboratories with the contemporary presence of two or three teachers of different disciplines, working together with the students on the same project with different approaches. This opportunity allowed us to introduce the "knowledge engineer" as a teacher in the laboratory of building technology. IPER is given to the students with the aim of experimenting and solving the theoretical and practical difficulties that students of different years may encounter in the knowledge and representation of buildings and in the organisation of all the data from the case study.
series eCAADe
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_1.htm
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id diss_anders
id diss_anders
authors Anders, P.
year 2003
title A Procedural Model for Integrating Physical and Cyberspaces in Architecture
source Doctoral dissertation, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, U.K
summary This dissertation articulates opportunities offered by architectural computation, in particular the digital simulation of space known as virtual reality (VR) and its networked, social variant cyberspace. Research suggests that environments that hybridize technologies call for a conception of space as information, i.e. space is both a product of and tool for cognition. The thesis proposes a model whereby architecture can employ this concept of space in creating hybrids that integrate physical and cyberspaces.The dissertation presents important developments in architectural computation that disclose concepts and values that contrast with orthodox practice. Virtual reality and cyberspace, the foci of this inquiry, are seen to embody the more problematic aspects of these developments. They also raise a question of redundancy: If a simulation is good enough, do we still need to build? This question, raised early in the 1990's, is explored through a thought experiment - the Library Paradox - which is assessed and critiqued for its idealistic premises. Still, as technology matures and simulations become more realistic the challenge posed by VR/cyberspace to architecture only becomes more pressing. If the case for virtual idealism seems only to be strengthened by technological and cultural trends, it would seem that a virtual architecture should have been well established in the decade since its introduction.Yet a history of the virtual idealist argument discloses the many difficulties faced by virtual architects. These include differences between idealist and professional practitioners, the failure of technology to achieve its proponents' claims, and confusion over the meaning of virtual architecture among both architects and clients. However, the dissertation also cites the success of virtual architecture in other fields - Human Computer Interface design, digital games, and Computer Supported Collaborative Work - and notes that their adoption of space derives from practice within each discipline. It then proposes that the matter of VR/cyberspace be addressed from within the practice of architecture, a strategy meant to balance the theoretical/academic inclination of previous efforts in this field.The dissertation pursues an assessment that reveals latent, accepted virtualities in design methodologies, instrumentation, and the notations of architectural practices. Of special importance is a spatial database that now pervades the design and construction processes. The unity of this database, effectively a project's cyberspace, and its material counterpart is the subject of the remainder of the dissertation. Such compositions of physical and cyberspaces are herein called cybrids. The dissertation examines current technologies that cybridize architecture and information technology, and proposes their integration within cybrid wholes. The concept of cybrids is articulated in seven principles that are applied in a case study for the design for the Planetary Collegium. The project is presented and critiqued on the basis of these seven principles. The dissertation concludes with a discussion of possible effects of cybrids upon architecture and contemporary culture.
series thesis:PhD
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2005/09/09 10:58

_id acadia10_125
id acadia10_125
authors Andersen, Paul; Salomon, David
year 2010
title The Pattern That Connects
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 125-132
summary While patterns have a spotty history in architecture, their definitions and uses in other fields offer new possibilities for design. This paper examines those definitions and uses—including theories put forward by architectural theorist, Christopher Alexander; art educator, Gyorgy Kepes; chemist, Ilya Prigogine; and anthropologist, Gregory Bateson. Of particular interest is the shift from eternal, essential, universal, and fundamental patterns to fleeting, superficial, specific, and incidental versions. While endemic to many contemporary architectural practices, this multifaceted view of patterns was anticipated by Bateson, who saw them as agents of evolution and learning. His desire to combine redundancy and noise offers architects new ways to understand patterns and use them to link form and information, matter and thought.
keywords pattern, Bateson, evolution, noise, redundancy, feedback
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email Paul@indiearchitecture.com
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id 0ecc
authors Anh, Tran Hoai
year 1994
title APPLICATION OF FULL-SCALE MODELLING IN VIETNAM: AN OUTLINE FOR DISCUSSION
source Beyond Tools for Architecture [Proceedings of the 5th European Full-scale Modeling Association Conference / ISBN 90-6754-375-6] Wageningen (The Netherlands) 6-9 September 1994, pp. 59-70
summary This paper discusses the possibility of applying full-scale modelling in Vietnam, a non-western so called developing country. It deals with two main questions: 1) Is the application of full-scale modelling to be restricted to the West only? 2) what are the possibilities, constraints and fields of application - with attention to the methodological validity and technical solution for full-scale modelling in Vietnam? It is argued that since full-scale modelling is based on people-environment interaction, it should, in principle, apply to studies about people–environment relation anywhere on earth. On the methodological validity, it is discussed that application of full-scale modelling in Vietnam faces similar methodological problems as encountered in European applications (such as people's behaviour in experiment, ability to understand the abstraction of models, etc.) although at another level as this paper will make clear. However, it would be needed to design a modelling kit that is of low costs and adapted to the availability of local materials and suitable for the climatic condition of Vietnam. Two fields of application are projected as most applicable in Vietnam: modelling in architectural education and research investigation. Application for user's participation in the design process will depend on the development of building policy in the country.
keywords Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
last changed 2004/05/04 09:00

_id ga9922
id ga9922
authors Annunziato, M. and Pierucci, P.
year 1999
title The Art of Emergence
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Since several years, the term emergence is mentioned in the paradigm of chaos and complexity. Following this approach, complex system constituted by multitude of individual develop global behavioral properties on the base of local chaotic interactions (self-organization). These theories, developed in scientific and philosophical milieus are rapidly spreading as a "way of thinking" in the several fields of cognitive activities. According to this "way of thinking" it is possible revise some fundamental themes as the economic systems, the cultural systems, the scientific paths, the communication nets under a new approach where nothing is pre-determined, but the global evolution is determined by specific mechanisms of interaction and fundamental events (bifurcation). With a jump in scale of the life, also other basic concepts related to the individuals as intelligence, consciousness, psyche can be revised as self-organizing phenomena. Such a conceptual fertility has been the base for the revision of the artistic activities as flexible instruments for the investigation of imaginary worlds, metaphor of related real worlds. In this sense we claim to the artist a role of "researcher". Through the free exploration of new concepts, he can evoke qualities, configurations and hypothesis which have an esthetical and expressive value and in the most significant cases, they can induce nucleation of cultural and scientific bifurcation. Our vision of the art-science relation is of cooperative type instead of the conflict of the past decades. In this paper we describe some of the most significant realized artworks in order to make explicit the concepts and basic themes. One of the fundamental topics is the way to generate and think to the artwork. Our characterization is to see the artwork not as a static finished product, but as an instance or a dynamic sequence of instances of a creative process which continuously evolves. In this sense, the attention is focused on the "generative idea" which constitutes the envelop of the artworks generable by the process. In this approach the role of technology (computers, synthesizers) is fundamental to create the dimension of the generative environment. Another characterizing aspect of our artworks is derived by the previous approach and specifically related to the interactive installations. The classical relation between artist, artwork and observers is viewed as an unidirectional flux of messages from the artist to the observer through the artwork. In our approach artist, artwork and observer are autonomous entities provided with own personality which jointly intervene to determine the creative paths. The artist which generate the environment in not longer the "owner" of the artwork; simply he dialectically bring the generative environment (provided by a certain degree of autonomy) towards cultural and creative "void" spaces (not still discovered). The observers start from these platforms to generate other creative paths, sometimes absolutely unexpected , developing their new dialectical relations with the artwork itself. The results derived by these positions characterize the expressive elements of the artworks (images, sequences and sounds) as the outcomes of emergent behavior or dynamics both in the sense of esthetical shapes emergent from fertile generative environments, either in terms of emergent relations between artist, artwork and observer, either in terms of concepts which emerge by the metaphor of artificial worlds to produce imaginary hypothesis for the real worlds.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ddssup0202
id ddssup0202
authors Antoni, J.P.
year 2002
title Urban Sprawl Modelling: Combining Models to Make Decision
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Urban sprawl is frequently associated with the idea of an unsuitable development, leading to increasing economic, social and environmental problems. Moreover, its control is difficult because multiple patterns (concerning numerous traditional urban planning fields) overlap. In order to understand the sprawl process and to manage its consequences, it must be simplified. The construction of a decision making tool appears then interesting. The GIS-based tool presented here is being developed incollaboration between the urban planning agency of Belfort and the laboratory of geography of Strasbourg. It requires three steps: 1. quantification of the sprawl (how much areas are involved in theurban sprawl process?); 2. location of the sprawl (where are the areas defined in the first step?); 3. differentiation of the sprawl (what are the areas located in the second step?). Of course, the successionof the three stages makes the use of the complete model more complex. So, a global ergonomic user interface is being developed within the GIS, allowing to modify each parameter and to play easily numerous simulations.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id acadia06_230
id acadia06_230
authors Anzalone, Phillip
year 2006
title Synthetic Research
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 230-231
summary Synthetic Research insinuates a relationship of a meticulous process of discovering truth contradicted against a fabricated, as in concocted, reality. It is important to recognize the logical aspect of synthetic when examining what synthetic research can provide for architectural discourse. Synthesis contrasts with analysis in that it’s primary methods involve recourse to experience; it is experience that is at the heart of synthetic research. The synthesis of theory, architectural constructions, technological artifacts and computational techniques requires experiencing the results of experimentation. Synthetic digital architecture necessitates a discovery process incorporating creation that allows for experience, be it virtual reality, full-scale prototyping or spatial creations; provided experience is a truthful one, and not disingenuous and thereby slipping into the alternate definition of synthetic.Research’s experimental arm, as opposed to the analytic, relies on tinkering - implying the unfinished, the incomplete, the prototype. Examples of this are everywhere. Computer screenshots are a strikingly literal example of synthetic research when used as a means of experiencing a process. Performance mock-ups of building assemblies are a method of synthetic research in that one experiences a set of defined performances in order to discover and redefine the project. The watchmaker craft is an exercise in research/experimentation where material properties are inherent in function and aesthetics; consider how the components interact with the environment - motion, gravity, space-time, temperature. Efficiency at this point is predominantly structural and physical. Decorative or aesthetic elements are applied or integrated in later iterations along with optimization of performance, marketing and costs.What is a architectural research? How can research synthesize the wide range of possibilities for the trajectory of architecture when engaged in digital and computational techniques? The goals, techniques, documentation and other methods of research production have a place in architecture that must be explored, particularly as it related to computation. As in other fields, we must build a legitimate body of research whereby others can use and expand upon, such that digital architectures evolve in innovative as well as prosperous paths.
series ACADIA
email phil@abc-architects.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id sigradi2014_339
id sigradi2014_339
authors Arenas Bahamondes, Felipe Ignacio; Claudio Andrés Fredes Osses
year 2014
title Principios de diseño de juegos ubicuos: Modelo para la implementación de juegos de infraestructura multimedial en espacios aumentados [Design principles of ubiquitous games: A model for implementing games of multimedia infrastructure in augmented spaces]
source siGraDi 2014 [Proceedings of the 18th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-9974-99-655-7] Uruguay - Montevideo 12 - 14 November 2014, pp. 450-454
summary This research aims to build a method for making ubiquitous games using urban screens. It explores the boundaries between the fields of architecture, new media art and design, describing a theoretical framework that illustrates the potentials of designing game systems in the public space as well as the benefits that include the use of public screens to construct social interaction. Through the analysis and interpretation of several case studies we were able to determine the key aspects that designers should consider developing this kind of projects.
keywords Ubiquitous games; Augmented spaces; Urban screens; Public space; Active citizenship
series SIGRADI
email f.arenas.b@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 45a2
authors Armesto, Tristán
year 2001
title SIMULACRO ARQUITECTÓNICO AL ALCANCE DE LAS MANOS (Architectonic Simulacrum within Reach)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 148-150
summary Since middle ‘90’s, the outbreak of 3d hardware acceleration devices for PC software, has facilitated a great evolvement in what is known as “Role Play Games” (RPG) – within the entertainment software industry. This development has produced such a phenomenon that surpassed all expectations. Through the game “engine” tools, virtual spaces can be achieved according to an editor’s criterium. Thus, a varied range of uses in different research fields are permitted. It is possible to build architectural simulations with high degree of realism an interactivity by means of ‘levels editors’ found in most of this games.
series SIGRADI
email trisar@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

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