CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id 2005_010
id 2005_010
authors Aish, Robert
year 2005
title From Intuition to Precision
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 10-14
summary Design has been described as making inspire decisions with incomplete information. True, we may use prior knowledge, we may even think we understand the causalites involved, but what really matters is exploration: of new forms, of new materials, and speculation about the response to the resulting effects. Essentially, this exploration has its own dynamics, involving intuition and spontaneity, and without which there is no design. But of course we all know that this is not the whole story. Design is different to 'craft'; to directly 'making' or 'doing'. It necessarily has to be predictive in order to anticipate what the consequence of the 'making' or 'doing' will be. Therefore we inevitably have to counter balance our intuition with a well developed sense of premeditation. We have to be able to reason about future events, about the consequence of something that has not yet being made. There is always going to be an advantage if this reasoning can be achieved with a degree of precision. So how can we progress from intuition to precision? What abstractions can we use to represent, externalize and test the concepts involved? How can we augment the cognitive processes? How can we record the progression of ideas? And, how do we know when we have arrived? Design has a symbiotic relationship with geometry. There are many design issues that are independent of any specific configurations. We might call these “pre-geometric” issues. And having arrived at a particular configuration, there may be many material interpretations of the same geometry. We might call these “post-geometric” issues. But geometry is central to design, and without appropriate geometric understanding, the resulting design will be limited. Geometry has two distinct components, one is a formal descriptive system and the other is a process of subjective evaluation.
series eCAADe
email Robert.Aish@bentley.com
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id caadria2016_435
id caadria2016_435
authors Lin, Chieh-Jen
year 2016
title The STG Pattern: Application of a “Semantic-Topological-Geometric” Information Conversion Pattern to Knowledge Modeling in Architectural Conceptual Design
source Living Systems and Micro-Utopias: Towards Continuous Designing, Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2016) / Melbourne 30 March–2 April 2016, pp. 435-444
summary Generative modelling tools have become a popular means of composing algorithms to generate complex building forms at the conceptual design stage. However, composing algorithms in order to meet the requirements of general design criteria, and communicating those criteria with other disciplines by means of generative algorithms still faces technical challenges. This paper proposes the use of a “Se- mantic-Topological-Geometric (STG)” pattern to guide architects in composing algorithms for representing, modelling, and validating de- sign knowledge and criteria. The STG pattern aims to help architects for converting semantic information concerning the situations of a project into design criteria, which are usually composed of topological relations among design elements, in order to explore the geometric properties of building components by means of generated 3D models.
keywords Generative modelling; design criteria; design pattern; semantic ontology; BIM
series CAADRIA
email T60011@mail.tut.edu.tw
last changed 2016/03/11 09:21

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