CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 1 to 4 of 4

_id acadia04_000
id acadia04_000
authors Beesley, P., Cheng, N.Y.-W. and Williamson, R.S. (eds.)
year 2004
title FABRICATION: EXAMINING THE DIGITAL PRACTICE OF ARCHITECTURE
source Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture and the 2004 Conference of the AIA Technology in Architectural Practice Knowledge Community / ISBN 09696665-2-7] Cambridge (Ontario) 8-14 November, 2004.
summary We are presenting design ideas, technical innovation, and fabrication expertise that address crucial issues. Authors investigate how to effectively design and practice architecture with automated prototyping and manufacturing. We want to understand where this might lead, and how it might change the nature of architecture itself. We are just beginning to discover the opportunities to be found in integrating automated fabrication within the practice of architecture. At the same time, the new century has brought very mixed perspectives on confident Modern progress. A cautious scrutiny of 'innovation' is needed. Fabrication is an old word with the straightforward meaning, to make. The roots of the word lead to the origins of architecture. Making has been considered a virtue by ancient writers and modern politicians alike. Fabrication (and homo faber, 'one who makes') have served as fundamental terms that constitutions and contract laws have been built upon. Shaping and working with materials is at the core of Western civilization. However at a point in human history where nature is steadily being replaced by human artifice, the consequences of making are far from simple. Whether for good or ill, our new fabricated environment is transforming the world.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
last changed 2005/03/07 06:14

_id sigradi2016_621
id sigradi2016_621
authors Gomes, Maria Cecília Rocha Couto; Santos, Ana Paula Baltazar dos; Arruda, Guilherme Ferreira de; Cabral Filho , José dos Santos; Silva, Luís Henrique Marques de Oliveira; Diniz, Luiza Encarnaç?o; Lima, Mariana Julia Souza Barbosa; Stralen, Mateus de Sousa van
year 2016
title Parametrizaç?o para além do processo de projeto: experimentando aberturas para interaç?o [Parametrization beyond the design process: trying out openness for interaction]
source SIGraDi 2016 [Proceedings of the 20th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-956-7051-86-1] Argentina, Buenos Aires 9 - 11 November 2016, pp.790-794
summary This paper discusses the use of parametrization and digital fabrication in architecture proposing a shift from increasing the architect’s control over the final product (determinist paradigm), towards increasing users' interaction. It presents the design process of an experimental interactive object intended to meet the former discussion and test the limits and difficulties that might arise during the process. Such an object was developed by Lagear (UFMG), as a response to the exhibition Homo Faber: Digital Fabrication in Latin America, CAAD FUTURES 2015.
keywords Interactive object; Parametrization; Digital Fabrication; Representation; Interaction
series SIGraDi
email mceciliarcgomes@gmail.com
last changed 2017/06/21 12:20

_id 1bb0
authors Russell, S. and Norvig, P.
year 1995
title Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach
source Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ
summary Humankind has given itself the scientific name homo sapiens--man the wise--because our mental capacities are so important to our everyday lives and our sense of self. The field of artificial intelligence, or AI, attempts to understand intelligent entities. Thus, one reason to study it is to learn more about ourselves. But unlike philosophy and psychology, which are also concerned with AI strives to build intelligent entities as well as understand them. Another reason to study AI is that these constructed intelligent entities are interesting and useful in their own right. AI has produced many significant and impressive products even at this early stage in its development. Although no one can predict the future in detail, it is clear that computers with human-level intelligence (or better) would have a huge impact on our everyday lives and on the future course of civilization. AI addresses one of the ultimate puzzles. How is it possible for a slow, tiny brain{brain}, whether biological or electronic, to perceive, understand, predict, and manipulate a world far larger and more complicated than itself? How do we go about making something with those properties? These are hard questions, but unlike the search for faster-than-light travel or an antigravity device, the researcher in AI has solid evidence that the quest is possible. All the researcher has to do is look in the mirror to see an example of an intelligent system. AI is one of the newest disciplines. It was formally initiated in 1956, when the name was coined, although at that point work had been under way for about five years. Along with modern genetics, it is regularly cited as the ``field I would most like to be in'' by scientists in other disciplines. A student in physics might reasonably feel that all the good ideas have already been taken by Galileo, Newton, Einstein, and the rest, and that it takes many years of study before one can contribute new ideas. AI, on the other hand, still has openings for a full-time Einstein. The study of intelligence is also one of the oldest disciplines. For over 2000 years, philosophers have tried to understand how seeing, learning, remembering, and reasoning could, or should, be done. The advent of usable computers in the early 1950s turned the learned but armchair speculation concerning these mental faculties into a real experimental and theoretical discipline. Many felt that the new ``Electronic Super-Brains'' had unlimited potential for intelligence. ``Faster Than Einstein'' was a typical headline. But as well as providing a vehicle for creating artificially intelligent entities, the computer provides a tool for testing theories of intelligence, and many theories failed to withstand the test--a case of ``out of the armchair, into the fire.'' AI has turned out to be more difficult than many at first imagined, and modern ideas are much richer, more subtle, and more interesting as a result. AI currently encompasses a huge variety of subfields, from general-purpose areas such as perception and logical reasoning, to specific tasks such as playing chess, proving mathematical theorems, writing poetry{poetry}, and diagnosing diseases. Often, scientists in other fields move gradually into artificial intelligence, where they find the tools and vocabulary to systematize and automate the intellectual tasks on which they have been working all their lives. Similarly, workers in AI can choose to apply their methods to any area of human intellectual endeavor. In this sense, it is truly a universal field.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id cf2015_460
id cf2015_460
authors Sperling, David M.; Herrera, Pablo C. and Scheeren, Rodrigo
year 2015
title Migratory movements of Homo Faber Mapping Fab Labs in Latin America
source The next city - New technologies and the future of the built environment [16th International Conference CAAD Futures 2015. Sao Paulo, July 8-10, 2015. Electronic Proceedings/ ISBN 978-85-85783-53-2] Sao Paulo, Brazil, July 8-10, 2015, pp. 460.
summary The present paper is a mapping study of digital fabrication laboratories in Latin America. It presents and discusses results from a survey with 31 universities’ fab labs, studios and independent initiatives in Latin America. The objective of this study is fourfold: firstly, to draw the cultural, social and economic context of implementation of digital fabrication laboratories in the region; secondly, to synthesize relevant data from correlations between organizational structures, facilities and technologies, activities, types of prototypes, uses and areas of application; thirdly, to draw a network of people and institutions, recovering connections and the genealogy of these fab labs; and fourthly, to present some fab labs that are intertwined with local questions. The results obtained indicate a complex “homo faber” network of initiatives that embraces academic investigations, architectural developments, industry applications, artistic propositions and actions in social processes.
keywords digital fabrication, fab labs, Latin America, mapping.
series CAAD Futures
email sperling@sc.usp.br
last changed 2015/06/29 05:55

No more hits.

HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_322980 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002