CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 247

_id cf2011_p109
id cf2011_p109
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Lee Jinkook, Eastman Chuck
year 2011
title Automated Cost Analysis of Concept Design BIM Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 403-418.
summary AUTOMATED COST ANALYSIS OF CONCEPT DESIGN BIM MODELS Interoperability: BIM models and cost models This paper introduces the automated cost analysis developed for the General Services Administration (GSA) and the analysis results of a case study involving a concept design courthouse BIM model. The purpose of this study is to investigate interoperability issues related to integrating design and analysis tools; specifically BIM models and cost models. Previous efforts to generate cost estimates from BIM models have focused on developing two necessary but disjoint processes: 1) extracting accurate quantity take off data from BIM models, and 2) manipulating cost analysis results to provide informative feedback. Some recent efforts involve developing detailed definitions, enhanced IFC-based formats and in-house standards for assemblies that encompass building models (e.g. US Corps of Engineers). Some commercial applications enhance the level of detail associated to BIM objects with assembly descriptions to produce lightweight BIM models that can be used by different applications for various purposes (e.g. Autodesk for design review, Navisworks for scheduling, Innovaya for visual estimating, etc.). This study suggests the integration of design and analysis tools by means of managing all building data in one shared repository accessible to multiple domains in the AEC industry (Eastman, 1999; Eastman et al., 2008; authors, 2010). Our approach aims at providing an integrated platform that incorporates a quantity take off extraction method from IFC models, a cost analysis model, and a comprehensive cost reporting scheme, using the Solibri Model Checker (SMC) development environment. Approach As part of the effort to improve the performance of federal buildings, GSA evaluates concept design alternatives based on their compliance with specific requirements, including cost analysis. Two basic challenges emerge in the process of automating cost analysis for BIM models: 1) At this early concept design stage, only minimal information is available to produce a reliable analysis, such as space names and areas, and building gross area, 2) design alternatives share a lot of programmatic requirements such as location, functional spaces and other data. It is thus crucial to integrate other factors that contribute to substantial cost differences such as perimeter, and exterior wall and roof areas. These are extracted from BIM models using IFC data and input through XML into the Parametric Cost Engineering System (PACES, 2010) software to generate cost analysis reports. PACES uses this limited dataset at a conceptual stage and RSMeans (2010) data to infer cost assemblies at different levels of detail. Functionalities Cost model import module The cost model import module has three main functionalities: generating the input dataset necessary for the cost model, performing a semantic mapping between building type specific names and name aggregation structures in PACES known as functional space areas (FSAs), and managing cost data external to the BIM model, such as location and construction duration. The module computes building data such as footprint, gross area, perimeter, external wall and roof area and building space areas. This data is generated through SMC in the form of an XML file and imported into PACES. Reporting module The reporting module uses the cost report generated by PACES to develop a comprehensive report in the form of an excel spreadsheet. This report consists of a systems-elemental estimate that shows the main systems of the building in terms of UniFormat categories, escalation, markups, overhead and conditions, a UniFormat Level III report, and a cost breakdown that provides a summary of material, equipment, labor and total costs. Building parameters are integrated in the report to provide insight on the variations among design alternatives.
keywords building information modeling, interoperability, cost analysis, IFC
series CAAD Futures
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ascaad2010_241
id ascaad2010_241
authors Aboreeda, Faten; Dina Taha
year 2010
title Using Case-Based Reasoning to Aid Sustainable Design
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 241-246
summary Since so far there exists only one planet, sustainable design is considered the (ethical) future in all fields of design. Although both architecture and construction are being considered major emitters of green house gases, a wise design not only can lead to minimizing this impact but it can also lead to restoring and regenerating the environment to a sustainable state. This paper presents an on-going research that aims at simplifying the elements and facilitating the process of sustainable design by using case-based reasoning. This is achieved through learning from past experiences; both good and bad ones, by providing a database application with a process-friendly interface which divides the main pillars of sustainable design into categories. Each building contains different stories related to different sustainable related issues. Each story can be repeated in /linked to many buildings. By providing designers with those past experiences, it is believed that deeper-studied designs can be more easily developed. Also a deeper analysis and understanding can be further implemented and produced with less effort for experienced and non-experienced architects in sustainable design. This would also decrease the consumption of time during the design process and encourage even more designers to integrate the sustainability concept into more designs. This research discusses the influence of sustainable design within the architectural domain, and suggests a computer application that aids architects during the preliminary design processes.
series ASCAAD
email fatenaboreeda@gmail.com
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id ddss9801
id ddss9801
authors Achten, Henri and Leeuwen, Jos van
year 1998
title A Feature-Based Description Technique for Design Processes: A Case Study
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary In order to develop appropriate tools for decision support in design processes, it is necessary to found them on an understanding of design. Analytical techniques of design processes that have a direct relationship with tool development can enhance design support systems development. The paper focuses on a design support system in the VR-DIS research program. The aim of this research program is to develop insight in the architectural design process and to establish design tools for architectsworking in Virtual Reality. The basic approach for data modelling in VR in this research is based on an extension of the Feature Based Modelling paradigm taken from design in mechanical engineering. The computer model of the design in the system is a Feature-based model. This paper describes design processes in terms of changes in the Feature-based model of the design. For this purpose, a case of a house design is used. Drawings in the conceptual design phase up to the preliminary design phase arestudied. Each state of the drawings is described in terms of a Feature-model. Particular design actions such as creation of spaces, definition of architectural elements, and changes during the design process can be expressed in terms of changes in the Feature-model. Because of the use of Features, the changes can be formalised in the VR-DIS system. The description in terms of Features offers an analytical toolthat leads to a functional brief for design support tools. The paper ends with a discussion of implications and future work.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id bbc9
id bbc9
authors Aeck, Richard
year 2008
title Turnstijl Houses & Cannoli Framing
source VDM Verlag Dr. Muller Aktiengesellschaft Co. KG, Germany

ISBN: 3639078470 ISBN-13: 9783639078473

summary This work presumes that integrating modeling tools and digital fabrication technology into architectural practice will transform how we build the detached house. Single-family houses come in all shapes and sizes, and in doing so, imply variation as well in certain materials, methods, and lighter classes of structure. Ultimately, houses are extensions, if not expressions, of those dwelling within, yet our attempts to produce appealing manufactured houses have prioritized standardization over variation and fall short of this ideal. Rather than considering new offerings born of the flexibility and precision afforded by digital production, sadly, today’s homebuilders are busy using our advancing fabrication technology to hasten the production of yesterday’s home. In response to such observations, and drawing upon meta-themes (i.e., blending and transition) present in contemporary design, this study proposes a hybrid SIP/Lam framing system and a corresponding family of houses. The development of the Cannoli Framing System (CFS) through 3D and physical models culminates in the machining and testing of full-scale prototypes. Three demonstrations, branded the Turnstijl Houses, are generated via a phased process where their schema, structure, and system geometry are personalized at their conception. This work pursues the variation of type and explores the connection between type and production methodology. Additional questions are also raised and addressed, such as how is a categorical notion like type defined, affected, and even “bred”?
keywords Digital Manufacturing, Type, Typology, CNC, SIP, SIPs, Foam, PreFab, Prefabrication, Framing, Manufactured House, Modular, Packaged House, Digital, Plywood, Methodology
series thesis:MSc
type normal paper
email raeck@branchoff.net
more http://branchoff.net
last changed 2010/11/16 07:29

_id cf2015_240
id cf2015_240
authors Aksoy, Yazgi Badem; Çagdas, Gülen and Balaban, Özgün
year 2015
title A model for sustainable site layout design of social housing with Pareto Genetic Algorithm: SSPM
source The next city - New technologies and the future of the built environment [16th International Conference CAAD Futures 2015. Sao Paulo, July 8-10, 2015. Electronic Proceedings/ ISBN 978-85-85783-53-2] Sao Paulo, Brazil, July 8-10, 2015, pp. 240.
summary Nowadays as the aim to reduce the environmental impact of buildings becomes more apparent, a new architectural design approach is gaining momentum called sustainable architectural design. Sustainable architectural design process includes some regulations itself, which requires calculations, comparisons and consists of several possible conflicting objectives that need to be considered together. A successful green building design can be performed by the creation of alternative designs generated according to all the sustainability parameters and local regulations in conceptual design stage. As there are conflicting criteria's according to LEED and BREAM sustainable site parameters, local regulations and local climate conditions, an efficient decision support system can be developed by the help of Pareto based non-dominated genetic algorithm (NSGA-II) which is used for several possibly conflicting objectives that need to be considered together. In this paper, a model which aims to produce site layout alternatives according to sustainability criteria for cooperative apartment house complexes, will be mentioned.
keywords Sustainable Site Layout Design, Multi Objective Genetic Algorithm, LEED-BREEAM.
series CAAD Futures
type normal paper
email yazbadem@hotmail.com
last changed 2015/06/29 07:30

_id acadia17_62
id acadia17_62
authors Al-Assaf, Nancy S.; Clayton, Mark J.
year 2017
title Representing the Aesthetics of Richard Meier’s Houses Using Building Information Modeling
source ACADIA 2017: DISCIPLINES & DISRUPTION [Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-96506-1] Cambridge, MA 2-4 November, 2017), pp. 62-71
summary Beyond its widespread use for representing technical aspects and matters of building and construction science, Building information modeling (BIM) can be used to represent architectural relationships and rules drawn from aesthetic theory. This research suggests that BIM provides not only vocabulary but also syntactical tools that can be used to capture an architectural language. In a case study using Richard Meier’s language for single-family detached houses, a BIM template has been devised to represent the aesthetic concepts and relations therein. The template employs parameterized conceptual mass objects, syntactical rules, and a library of architectonic elements, such as walls, roofs, columns, windows, doors, and railings. It constrains any design produced using the template to a grammatically consistent expression or style. The template has been used as the starting point for modeling the Smith House, the Douglas House, and others created by the authors, demonstrating that the aesthetic template is general to many variations. Designing with the template to produce a unique but conforming design further illustrates the generality and expressiveness of the language. Having made the formal language explicit, in terms of syntactical rules and vocabulary, it becomes easier to vary the formal grammar and concrete vocabulary to produce variant languages and styles. Accordingly, this approach is not limited to a specific style, such as Richard Meier's. Future research can be conducted to demonstrate how designing with BIM can support stylistic change. Adoption of this approach in practice could improve the consistency of architectural designs and their coherence to defined styles, potentially increasing the general level of aesthetic expression in our built environment.
keywords design methods; information processing; BIM; education
series ACADIA
email nancy.alassaf@tamu.edu
last changed 2017/10/17 09:12

_id ascaad2016_003
id ascaad2016_003
authors Al-Jokhadar, Amer; Wassim Jabi
year 2016
title Humanising the Computational Design Process - Integrating Parametric Models with Qualitative Dimensions
source Parametricism Vs. Materialism: Evolution of Digital Technologies for Development [8th ASCAAD Conference Proceedings ISBN 978-0-9955691-0-2] London (United Kingdom) 7-8 November 2016, pp. 9-18
summary Parametric design is a computational-based approach used for understanding the logic and the language embedded in the design process algorithmically and mathematically. Currently, the main focus of computational models, such as shape grammar and space syntax, is primarily limited to formal and spatial requirements of the design problem. Yet, qualitative factors, such as social, cultural and contextual aspects, are also important dimensions in solving architectural design problems. In this paper, an overview of the advantages and implications of the current methods is presented. It also puts forward a ‘structured analytical system’ that combines the formal and geometric properties of the design, with descriptions that reflect the spatial, social and environmental patterns. This syntactic-discursive model is applied for encoding vernacular courtyard houses in the hot-arid regions of the Middle East and North Africa, and utilising the potentials of these cases in reflecting the lifestyle and the cultural values of the society, such as privacy, human-spatial behaviour, the social life inside the house, the hierarchy of spaces, the segregation and seclusion of family members from visitors and the orientation of spaces. The output of this analytical phase prepares the groundwork for the development of socio-spatial grammar for contemporary tall residential buildings that gives the designer the ability to reveal logical spatial topologies based on socio-environmental restrictions, and to produce alternatives that have an identity while also respecting the context, place and needs of users.
series ASCAAD
email Al-JokhadarA@cardiff.ac.uk
last changed 2017/05/25 11:13

_id acadia06_455
id acadia06_455
authors Ambach, Barbara
year 2006
title Eve’s Four Faces interactive surface configurations
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 455-460
summary Eve’s Four Faces consists of a series of digitally animated and interactive surfaces. Their content and structure are derived from a collection of sources outside the conventional boundaries of architectural research, namely psychology and the broader spectrum of arts and culture.The investigation stems from a psychological study documenting the attributes and social relationships of four distinct personality prototypes: the Individuated, the Traditional, the Conflicted, and the Assured (York and John 1992). For the purposes of this investigation, all four prototypes are assumed to be inherent, to certain degrees, in each individual. However, the propensity towards one of the prototypes forms the basis for each individual’s “personality structure.” The attributes, social implications and prospects for habitation have been translated into animations and surfaces operating within A House for Eve’s Four Faces. The presentation illustrates the potential for constructed surfaces to be configured and transformed interactively, responding to the needs and qualities associated with each prototype. The intention is to study the effects of each configuration and how each configuration may be therapeutic in supporting, challenging or altering one’s personality as it oscillates and shifts through the four prototypical conditions.
series ACADIA
email Ambachb@aol.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id 2006_040
id 2006_040
authors Ambach, Barbara
year 2006
title Eve’s Four Faces-Interactive surface configurations
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 40-44
summary Eve’s Four Faces consists of a series of digitally animated and interactive surfaces. Their content and structure are derived from a collection of sources outside the conventional boundaries of architectural research, namely psychology and the broader spectrum of arts and culture. The investigation stems from a psychological study documenting the attributes and social relationships of four distinct personality prototypes; the “Individuated”, the “Traditional”, the “Conflicted” and the “Assured”. (York and John, 1992) For the purposes of this investigation, all four prototypes are assumed to be inherent, to certain degrees, in each individual; however, the propensity towards one of the prototypes forms the basis for each individual’s “personality structure”. The attributes, social implications and prospects for habitation have been translated into animations and surfaces operating within A House for Eve’s Four Faces. The presentation illustrates the potential for constructed surfaces to be configured and transformed interactively, responding to the needs and qualities associated with each prototype. The intention is to study the effects of each configuration and how it may be therapeutic in supporting, challenging or altering one’s personality as it oscillates and shifts through the four prototypical conditions.
keywords interaction; digital; environments; psychology; prototypes
series eCAADe
type normal paper
last changed 2006/09/11 16:22

_id sigradi2016_440
id sigradi2016_440
authors Amorim, Arivaldo Le?o de
year 2016
title Cidades Inteligentes e City Information Modeling [Smart Cities and City Information Modeling]
source SIGraDi 2016 [Proceedings of the 20th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-956-7051-86-1] Argentina, Buenos Aires 9 - 11 November 2016, pp.481-488
summary This paper presents and discusses the relationship between the concepts of Smart Cities and City Information Modeling (CIM). It conveys the notion that these are complementary and not competing concepts, as one might think at first glance. On the other hand, the paper demonstrates the importance of these concepts to overcome the challenges to the cities of the 21st century, from findings contained in official documents published by the United Nations (UN), to analyze the growth of world population and the emergence of new cities to house population groups. Finally, this paper argues that the CIM with an inducing factor for the Smart City is an important resource to help improve the quality of life in cities.
keywords Smart Cities; City Information Modeling; Sustainability; Cities of the Future; Information Modeling
series SIGraDi
email alamorim@ufba.br
last changed 2017/06/21 12:18

_id caadria2010_005
id caadria2010_005
authors Anay, Hakan
year 2010
title Computational aspects of a design process: Mario Botta’s single-family house in Breganzona
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 49-58
summary The present study aims to foreground and investigate computational aspects of the design process of Mario Botta’s single-family house in Breganzona. Through the selected case, it mainly addresses the research question, “what are the computational aspects of the examined design process and what is the nature of such aspects?” or, otherwise formulated, “what aspects of such a design process could be formalised, and thus, represented or explained in computational terms?” The study primarily involves analysis and investigation of the “material”; the sketches and the drawings produced during the design process and through this material, reinterpretation, and hypothetical reconstruction of the process. The material is taken as the container of design ideas / concepts and operations, and a formal / conceptual analysis is employed to foreground and extract this content.
keywords Design process; design analysis; design computation; design knowledge
series CAADRIA
email hakananay@yahoo.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id 5cba
authors Anders, Peter
year 1999
title Beyond Y2k: A Look at Acadia's Present and Future
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 1, p. 10
summary The sky may not be falling, but it sure is getting closer. Where will you when the last three zeros of our millennial odometer click into place? Computer scientists tell us that Y2K will bring the world’s computer infrastructure to its knees. Maybe, maybe not. But it is interesting that Y2K is an issue at all. Speculating on the future is simultaneously a magnifying glass for examining our technologies and a looking glass for what we become through them. "The future" is nothing new. Orwell's vision of totalitarian mass media did come true, if only as Madison Avenue rather than Big Brother. Futureboosters of the '50s were convinced that each garage would house a private airplane by the year 2000. But world citizens of the 60's and 70's feared a nuclear catastrophe that would replace the earth with a smoking crater. Others - perhaps more optimistically -predicted that computers were going to drive all our activities by the year 2000. And, in fact, theymay not be far off... The year 2000 is symbolic marker, a point of reflection and assessment. And - as this date is approaching rapidly - this may be a good time to come to grips with who we are and where we want to be.
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.com
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 8d59
authors Andersen, J.M.
year 1983
title CAD in Architectural Practice
source Mechanical Engineering. July, 1983. pp. 48-54 : ill. includes a short bibliography
summary A leading architecture/engineering firm has made use of in- house computer system since 1963. This paper discusses some special topics in using computers for the design of HVAC systems, and the process of implementing CAD in the HVAC engineering practice
keywords computer graphics, HVAC, applications, practice, architecture
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id ecaade2007_010
id ecaade2007_010
authors Artopoulos, Giorgos; Kourtis, Lampros
year 2007
title The House of Affects Project
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 777-784
summary The House of Affects is an experimental installation to be part of the PerFormaSpace project pursued at the University of Cambridge, UK (DIGIS) and Goldsmiths College London, U.C.L. (Digital Studios), currently partially funded by Arts&Business East 2006, in collaboration with Econavate, UK who will provide their technical expertise in fabrication using recycled materials. This paper presents project-specific information and theoretical discussion on the design process and the computational methods used to develop advanced adaptive structural components in relationship to behavioral goals, criteria and constraints.
keywords Optimization, computational architecture, architectonics, adaptability
series eCAADe
email george.artopoulos@gmail.com, kourtis@stanford.edu
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

_id bcf7
authors Arvin, Scott A. and House, Donald H.
year 2002
title Modeling architectural design objectives in physically based space planning
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 213-225
summary Physically based space planning is a means for automating the conceptual design process by applying the physics of motion to space plan elements. This methodology provides for a responsive design process, which allows a designer to easily make decisions whose consequences immediately propagate throughout the design. It combines the speed of automated design methods with the flexibility of manual design methods, while adding a highly interactive quality and a sense of collaboration with the design itself. In our approach, the designer creates a space plan by specifying and modifying graphic design objectives rather than by directly manipulating primitive geometry. The plan adapts to the changing state of objectives by applying the physics of motion to its elements. For design objectives to affect a physically based space plan, they need to apply appropriate forces to space plan elements. Space planning can be separated into two problems, determining topological properties and determining geometric properties. Design objectives can then be categorized as topological or geometric objectives. Topological objectives influence the location of individual spaces, affecting how one space relates to another. Geometric objectives influence the size and shape of space boundaries, affecting the dimensions of individual walls. This paper focuses on how to model a variety of design objectives for use in a physically based space planning system. We describe how topological objectives, such as adjacency and orientation can be modeled to apply forces to space locations, and how geometric objectives, such as area, proportion, and alignment, can be modeled to apply forces to boundary edges.
series journal paper
email arvin@viz.tamu.edu
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id d423
authors Arvin, Scott A. and House, Donald H.
year 1999
title Making Designs Come Alive: Using Physically Based Modeling Techniques in Space Layout Planning
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 245-262
summary This paper introduces the concept of responsive design. It elaborates this concept as an approach to free form, adaptable, automated design applying physically based modeling techniques to the design process. Our approach attempts to bridge the gap between totally automated design and the free form brainstorming designers normally employ. We do this by automating the initial placement and sizing of design elements, with an interactive engine that appears alive and highly responsive. We present a method for applying these techniques to architectural space layout planning, and preliminary implementation details for a prototype system for developing rectangular, two-dimensional, single- story floor plans.
keywords Physically Based Space Layout, Physically Based Design, Responsive Design, Space Layout Planning, Computer-aided Design, Human-computer Interaction
series CAAD Futures
email arvin@viz.tamu.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id f317
authors Arvin, Scott A. and House, Donald H.
year 1999
title Modeling Architectural Design Objectives in Physically Based Space Planning
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 212-225
summary Physically based space planning is a means for automating the conceptual design process by applying the physics of motion to space plan elements. This methodology provides for a responsive design process, which allows a designer to easily make decisions whose consequences immediately propagate throughout the design. It combines the speed of automated design methods with the flexibility of manual design methods, while adding a highly interactive quality and a sense of collaboration with the design itself. In our approach, the designer creates a space plan by specifying and modifying graphic design objectives rather than by directly manipulating primitive geometry. The plan adapts to the changing state of objectives by applying the physics of motion to its elements. For design objectives to have an effect on a physically based space plan, they need to be able to apply appropriate forces to space plan elements. Space planning can be separated into two problems, determining topological properties and determining geometric properties. Design objectives can then be categorized as topological or geometric objectives. Topological objectives influence the location of individual spaces, affecting how one space relates to another. Geometric objectives influence the size and shape of space boundaries, affecting the dimensions of individual walls. This paper focuses on how to model a variety of design objectives for use in a physically based space planning system. We describe how topological objectives, such as adjacency and orientation, can be modeled to apply forces to space locations, and how geometric objectives, such as area, proportion, and alignment, can be modeled to apply forces to boundary edges.
series ACADIA
email arvin@viz.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id a620
authors Asanowicz, Alexander
year 1991
title Unde et Quo
source Experiences with CAAD in Education and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Munich (Germany) 17-19 October 1991
summary To begin with, I would like to say a few words about the problem of alienation of modern technologies which we also inevitably faced while starting teaching CAD at our department. Quite often nowadays a technology becomes a fetish as a result of lack of clear goals in human mind. There are multiple technologies without sense of purpose which turned into pure experiments. There is always the danger of losing purposeness and drifting toward alienation. The cause of the danger lies in forgetting about original goals while mastering and developing the technology. Eventually the original idea is ignored and a great gap appears between technical factors and creativity. We had the danger of alienation in mind when preparing the CAAD curriculum. Trying to avoid the tension between technical and creative elements we agreed not to introduce CAD too soon then the fourth year of studies and continue it for two semesters. One thing was clear - we should not teach the technique of CAD but how to design using a computer as a medium. Then we specified projects. The first was called "The bathroom I dream of" and meant to be a 2D drawing. The four introductory meetings were in fact teaching foundations of DOS, then a specific design followed with the help of AutoCAD program. In the IX semester, for example, it was "A family house" (plans, facades, perspective). "I have to follow them - I am their leader" said L.J. Peter in "The Peter's Prescription". This quotation reflects exactly the situation we find ourselves in teaching CAAD at our department. It means that ever growing students interest in CAAD made us introduce changes in the curriculum. According to the popular saying, "The more one gets the more one wants", so did we and the students feel after the first semester of teaching CAD. From autumn 1991 CAAD classes will be carried from the third year of studying for two consecutive years. But before further planning one major steep had to be done - we decided to reverse the typical of the seventies approach to the problem when teaching programming languages preceded practical goals hence discouraging many learners.

series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id sigradi2013_366
id sigradi2013_366
authors Barrios, Carlos R.
year 2013
title A Textile Block Grammar: An Analytical Shape Grammar to Study the Block Designs of Frank Lloyd Wright's Californian Textile Block Houses
source SIGraDi 2013 [Proceedings of the 17th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-956-7051-86-1] Chile - Valparaíso 20 - 22 November 2013, pp. 207 - 210
summary This paper presents an analytical shape grammar to study the designs of the ornamental blocks in Frank Lloyd Wright’s Californian Textile Block Houses. The paper introduces the textile block system and expands on the design of the Millard house as a case study. The paper presents two formalistic applications of the shape grammar to generate the original block design: one as a sequential shape grammar and the other as a parallel shape grammar. Both examples are able to generate the same results; and they hint at the potential to expand the shape grammar to generate other design alternatives.
keywords Shape grammars; Parametric design; Design analysis
series SIGRADI
email carlos@planetaryone.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ecaade2013_214
id ecaade2013_214
authors Barros, Pedro; Beirão, José and Duarte, José Pinto
year 2013
title The Language of Mozambican Slums
source Stouffs, Rudi and Sariyildiz, Sevil (eds.), Computation and Performance – Proceedings of the 31st eCAADe Conference – Volume 2, Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, 18-20 September 2013, pp. 715-724
wos WOS:000340643600074
summary A shape grammar was developed for analyzing the evolution of Maputo´s slums with the strategic objective of capturing the evolution of house types and understanding the social agreements behind the spatial relations of their house elementary spaces in order to reuse such rules for the purpose of rehabilitation. This paper shows preliminary results of the research and aims at developing, based on the resulting grammars, a parametric tool able to execute morphological analyses, simulations and generate improved design solutions for the qualification of Maputo´s informal settlements.
keywords Shape grammars; urbanism; computation; regeneration; informal settlements.
series eCAADe
email prbarros.arq@gmail.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

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