CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 12 of 12

_id ijac20053207
id ijac20053207
authors Achten, Henri
year 2005
title Digital Ground: Architecture, Pervasive Computing, and Environmental Knowledge by Malcolm McCullough
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 2, 255-258
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 17ae
authors McCullogh, M.
year 2000
title Abstracting Craft: The Practised Digital Hand
source MIT Press, Cambridge Mass.
summary Can designing for computers be a craft? This is the question this book sets out to answer. At first sight, the situation is unpromising: craft is the work of hands, and "hands are underrated," in modern life; especially as computers are seen as abstract, conceptual, creations of pure mind. Yet since computation has become a medium, rather than just a tool kit, the correspondence between digital work and traditional craft is increasing. Modern software products, though immaterial, are nevertheless the creation of "practised hands" and eyes, as well as minds. Moreover, to craft is to care: humane values can - and should - inform a software designer's work just as a potter's or carpenter's. McCullough gives all those who work with code the chance to proclaim: "I am not a programmer! I am a digital craftsperson!"
series other
email mmmc@umich.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 8bf3
authors McCullough, M., Mitchell, W.J. and Purcell, P. (Eds.)
year 1990
title The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [Conference Proceedings]
source International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design 1989/ ISBN 0-262-13254-0] (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, 505 p.
summary Design is the computation of shape information that is needed to guide fabrication or construction of artifacts. But it is not so straightforward as, say, the computation of numerical information required to balance a checkbook. This is partly because algebras of shapes are not as well understood and precisely formalized as algebras of numbers, partly because the rules for carrying out shape computations tend to be fluid and ill defined and partly because the predicates that must be satisfied to achieve successful termination are often complex and difficult to specify. For centuries architects have carried out shape computations by hand, using informal procedures and the simplest of tools. Over the last two decades though, they have made increasing use of more formal procedures executed by computers. It is still too early to be sure of the gains and losses that follow from this development, but there is no doubt that it raises some challenging questions of architectural theory and some perplexing issues for those concerned with the future of architectural education. This book frames those issues and provides a diversity of perspectives on them. Its contents were initially presented at the CAAD Futures 89 Conference-an international gathering of researchers and teachers in the field of computer-aided architectural design which was jointly sponsored by the Harvard Graduate School of Design and the MIT Department of Architecture and held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in July 1989. There are four major sections: Theoretical Foundations, Knowledge-Based Design Tools, Information Delivery Systems, and Case Studies: Electronic Media in the Design Studio. In a representative collection of current views, over thirty extensively illustrated papers discuss the experiences of universities in the USA, Europe, Japan, Israel, Canada, and Australia, articulate present theoretical and practical concerns, provide criticism of media and methods, and suggest directions for the future. Architectural educators and architects concerned with the effect of computer technology on the design process will find here an indispensable reference and a rich source of ideas. This book was itself prepared in an electronic design studio. Composition and typography, most image collection and placement, and such editing as was practical within this publishing format, were all performed digitally using Macintosh computers at the Harvard Graduate School of Design during a period of a few weeks in 1989.
series CAAD Futures
email mmmc@umich.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id 2a6e
authors McCullough, Malcolm
year 1988
title Representation in the Computer Aided Design Studio
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 163-174
summary Application of commercial computer aided design systems to schematic design in a studio setting in a professionally oriented university provides the opportunity for observation of extensive use of CAD by designers with little or no orientation toward computing. Within a framework of studios intended to contrast media and highlight the issue of design representation, the most encouraging applications of computing have involved dynamic visual design representation. This paper presents a case study of three studios at the University of Texas at Austin together with commentary on the place of computing in this essentially artistic environment. It presents, in slide form, a body of aesthetically oriented CAD work which signals the spread of computer aided design out of the hands of researchers and into mainstream architectural design, where development of the visual and dynamic aspects of the medium may prove to be primary routes to improvement of itS power and acceptance. Much like a first design project, this paper then presents a lot of observations without yet much rigorous development of any one. It asks implicitly whether application of software constitutes research.

series ACADIA
email mmmc@umich.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id 7c88
authors McCullough, Malcolm and Hoinkes, Rodney
year 1995
title Dynamic Data Sets as Collaboration in Urban Design
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 709-718
summary Computer applications to urban design involve a distinctively rich hybrid of geometric, geographic, and annotative information. This condition raises opportunities for collaboration, needs for data integration, and examples of the increasing importance of rich datasets as a basis for design work. This paper describes these general issues, provides substantive examples from recent studio work, and demonstrates a specific implementation of software integration. The latter includes a prototypical data interface, translation tables for multimedia linkage, and capacity to work together with a web browser.
keywords Datasets, Software Integration, Urban Design, Collaborative Work
series CAAD Futures
email mmmc@umich.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id ac36
authors McCullough, Malcolm
year 1990
title Low-Threshold Modeling
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures 89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 413-426
summary This is a case study of teaching at the University of Texas at Austin. It is about using an electronic design studio to provide architecture students with their first exposure to computing. It suggests that, despite the limitations of present technology, there is reason to lower the thresholds to computer-aided design. The study presents a studio which attempted such by allowing students to find their own level of commitment to use of electronic media for geometric modeling. More generally, the paper aims to document issues presently facing the many professional schools not having substantial traditions in computer-aided design education.
series CAAD Futures
email mmmc@umich.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id 66e3
authors McCullough, Malcolm
year 1993
title Interactive Urban Models
source Education and Practice: The Critical Interface [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-02-0] Texas (Texas / USA) 1993, pp. 57-68
summary Visual computing to support urban design will involve a synthesis of geometric modeling, geographic information systems (GIS), and interactive multimedia. Increasingly, CAD is a suitable point of departure for such work. Using such media, this study explores newly practical steps toward a body of media arts expressly for the design, analysis, and communication of urban form.
series ACADIA
email mmmc@umich.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id a9d7
authors Mitchell, J.W. and McCullough, M.
year 1991
title Digital Design Media: A Handbook for Architects and Design Professionals
source Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, pp. 421-422
summary In Digital Design Media architects and related design professionals will find a complete conceptual guide to the multidimensional world of computer-aided design. In contrast to the many books that describe how to use particular programs (and which therefore go out of date very quickly), Digital Design Media constructs a lasting theoretical framework, which will make it easier to understand a great number of programs-existing and future-as a whole. Clear structure, numerous historical references, and hundreds of illustrations make this framework both accessible to the nontechnical professional and broadening for the experienced computer-aided designer. The book will be especially valuable to anyone who is ready to expand their work in CAD beyond production drafting systems. The new second edition adds chapters one merging technologies, such as the Internet, but the book's original content is as valid as ever. Thousands of design students and practitioners have made this book a standard.
series other
email mmmc@umich.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ebb2
authors Proctor, George
year 2000
title Reflections on the VDS, Pedagogy, Methods
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 15-16
summary After having conducted a Digital Media based design studio at Cal Poly for six years, we have developed a body of experience I feel is worth sharing. When the idea of conducting a studio with the exclusive use of digital tools was implemented at our college, it was still somewhat novel, and only 2 short years after the first VDS- Virtual Design Studio (UBC, UHK et.al.-1993). When we began, most of what we explored required a suspension of disbelief on the part of both the students and faculty reviewers of studio work. In a few short years the notions we examined have become ubiquitous in academic architectural discourse and are expanding into common use in practice. (For background, the digital media component of our curriculum owes much to my time at Harvard GSD [MAUD 1989-91] and the texts of: McCullough/Mitchell 1990, 1994; McCullough 1998; Mitchell 1990,1992,1996; Tufte 1990; Turkel 1995; and Wojtowicz 1993; and others.)
series ACADIA
email georger@cybertects.com
last changed 2002/12/15 15:37

_id 8ea2
authors Simondetti, Alvise
year 2002
title Computer-generated physical modelling in the early stages of the design process
source Automation in Construction 11 (3) (2002) pp. 303-311
summary This paper illustrates some of the opportunities arising from the introduction of computer-generated physical modelling1 in the early stages of the architectural design process. The use of this technology in the design process differs from previous research and practise in that it looks at the use of computer-generated physical modelling recursively in design process rather than as a means to create a final presentation model [W.J. Mitchell, M. McCullough, Digital Design Media, Van Nostrand Reihnold, New York, 1994]. Previous research in the field by the author identified recursive strategy in the design process as the area in which computer-generated physical modelling offers unique opportunities to the designer. Three unique advantages in the use of computer-generated physical modelling technology are illustrated by three case studies. These advantages are: (1) understanding kinetic design, (2) understanding design involving complex geometry and (3) understanding design at the interface with the human body.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id c900
authors Wake, Warren K. and McCullough, Malcolm
year 1991
title Architectural Tours through Texture Space
source Reality and Virtual Reality [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-00-4] Los Angeles (California - USA) October 1991, pp. 53-62
summary One challenge to the computer-aided designer is to portray physical realities using only visual, logical, or numerical representations. Recently there has been a lot of speculation about meeting this challenge with a new dimension of tools which couples physical interaction to animated output: cyberspace. However, so long as certain inherent limitations remain in the physical part of cyberspace prototypes, there is more to be gained in improving our graphics independently. One aspect of graphics for portraying physicality which we can address right now is texture.
series ACADIA
email mmmc@umich.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

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