CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id b110
id b110
authors Abadi Abbo, Isaac and Cavallin Calanche, Humerto
year 1994
title Ecological Validity of Real Scale Models
source Beyond Tools for Architecture [Proceedings of the 5th European Full-scale Modeling Association Conference / ISBN 90-6754-375-6] Wageningen (The Netherlands) 6-9 September 1994, pp. 31-40
summary Space simulation is a technique employed by architects, urban designers, environmental psychologists and other related specialists. It is used for academic and research purposes, as an aid to evaluate the impact that the built environment or that to be built would yield in potential or real users. Real Scale Model is organized as one of the models which represents more reliable spatial characteristics in space simulations. However, it is necessary to know the ecological validity of the simulations carried out, that is the degree in which laboratory results could be taken as reliable and representative of real situations. In order to discover which variables of the model used are relevant so that their perception results ecologically valid in respect to reality, a research has been designed in which simulations of specific spaces are appraised both in real space and in the real scale model. The results of both evaluations were statistically analyzed and it shows no significative differences in psychological impressions between the evaluation of real spaces and real scale model. These ecological validation of the real scale model could be of great use to estimate the validity of the results obtained in spaces simulated in the laboratory.
keywords Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2006/06/24 07:29

_id fa3e
id fa3e
authors Achten, H., de Vries, B. and van Leeuwen, J.
year 2001
title THE VR-DIS RESEARCH PROGRAMME
source Achten, H.H., de Vries, B. and Hennessey, J. (eds). Design Research in the Netherlands 2000, 155-163
series book
type normal paper
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl
more http://www.designresearch.nl/PDF/DRN2000_AchtenDeVriesVanLeeuwen.pdf
last changed 2005/10/12 13:41

_id ddssar0201
id ddssar0201
authors Achten, H.H.
year 2002
title Requirements for Collaborative Design in Architecture
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary The concept of collaborative design has recently come under renewed attention in the field of computer aided architectural design support. Although collaborative design deals with the same aspects of cooperation by various participants in the design process as previously studiedin, for example, concurrent engineering and multi-disciplinary design, it nevertheless puts a different research emphasis. Collaborative design looks at how the process can be improved in such a way that collaboration –working together in a manner to enhance each participants contribution to the design– emerges from the process. In engineering design practice, thismeans a shift forward in the design process where engineers are asked earlier for their input in the design solution. For CAAD research, the phenomenon of collaborative design poses the question how design tools and environments can be made in such a way that collaboration will occur. In this paper, the aims is to describe the concept of collaborative design in architecture, and to give an outline of the perceived requirements in the organisation of design and Computer Aided Design Support to achieve collaborative design.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 1dfa
id 1dfa
authors Achten, H.H., de Vries, B. and Hennessey, J. (eds.)
year 2001
title DESIGN RESEARCH IN THE NETHERLANDS 2000 - PROCEEDINGS OF THE SYMPOSIUM, EINDHOVEN MAY 25-26 2000
source Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology
series book
type symposium
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl
more http://www.designresearch.nl/PDF/DRN2000_AchtenDeVriesHennessey_Proceedings.pdf
last changed 2005/10/12 13:28

_id f3a9
id f3a9
authors Achten, H.H., de Vries, B. and Hennessey, J.
year 2001
title DESIGN RESEARCH IN THE NETHERLANDS 2000
source Achten, H.H., de Vries, B. and Hennessey, J. (eds). Design Research in the Netherlands 2000, i-vi
series book
type normal paper
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl
more http://www.designresearch.nl/PDF/DRN2000_AchtenDeVriesHennessey_Introduction.pdf
last changed 2005/10/12 13:42

_id e322
id e322
authors Achten, H.H., Dorst, K., Stappers, P.J. and de Vries, B.
year 2005
title A DECADE OF DESIGN RESEARCH IN THE NETHERLANDS
source Achten, H.H., Dorst, K. Stappers, P.J. and de Vries, B. (eds.) Design Research in the Netherlands 2005, i-vii
series book
type normal paper
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl
more http://www.designresearch.nl/PDF/DRN2005_AchtenDorstStapperDeVries_Introduction.pdf
last changed 2005/10/12 13:52

_id 7897
authors Achten, Henri and De Vries, Bauke
year 2001
title Multiple Sketch Users in DDDoolz
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 153-162 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary This paper presents DDDoolz, a desktop-VR three-dimensional voxel sketchtool. DDDoolz is developed in the Design Systems Group to explore the use of Virtual Reality technology in the early design stage. The aim is to offer a sketch-like environment in VR with an unobtrusive interface. The paper presents DDDoolz, how it is used in education and with partners in architectural practice, and some future developments. As an extension to current functionality, the possibility of multiple users at the same time will be developed in the system for the {ACCOLADE} workshop.
series other
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id ddss9801
id ddss9801
authors Achten, Henri and Leeuwen, Jos van
year 1998
title A Feature-Based Description Technique for Design Processes: A Case Study
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary In order to develop appropriate tools for decision support in design processes, it is necessary to found them on an understanding of design. Analytical techniques of design processes that have a direct relationship with tool development can enhance design support systems development. The paper focuses on a design support system in the VR-DIS research program. The aim of this research program is to develop insight in the architectural design process and to establish design tools for architectsworking in Virtual Reality. The basic approach for data modelling in VR in this research is based on an extension of the Feature Based Modelling paradigm taken from design in mechanical engineering. The computer model of the design in the system is a Feature-based model. This paper describes design processes in terms of changes in the Feature-based model of the design. For this purpose, a case of a house design is used. Drawings in the conceptual design phase up to the preliminary design phase arestudied. Each state of the drawings is described in terms of a Feature-model. Particular design actions such as creation of spaces, definition of architectural elements, and changes during the design process can be expressed in terms of changes in the Feature-model. Because of the use of Features, the changes can be formalised in the VR-DIS system. The description in terms of Features offers an analytical toolthat leads to a functional brief for design support tools. The paper ends with a discussion of implications and future work.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ddssar0001
id ddssar0001
authors Achten, Henri and Leeuwen, Jos van
year 2000
title Towards generic representations of designs formalised as features
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fifth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Nijkerk, the Netherlands)
summary Feature-Based Modelling (FBM) is an information modelling technique that allows the formalisation of design concepts and using these formal definitions in design modelling. The dynamic nature of design and design information calls for a specialised approach to FBM that takes into account flexibility and extensibility of Feature Models of designs. Research work in Eindhoven has led to a FBM framework and implementation that can be used to support design.. Feature models of a design process has demonstrated the feasibility of using this information modelling technique. To develop the work on FBM in design, three tracks are initiated: Feature model descriptions of design processes, automated generic representation recognition in graphic representations, and Feature models of generic representations. The paper shows the status of the work in the first two tracks, and present the results of the research work.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 28b9
authors Achten, Henri
year 2001
title Future Scenario for a Collaborative Design Session
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 163-168 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary A collaborative design project consists of a team of design partners who are engaged during the period of the project in a particular design task. The group forms a short-lived community with the goal to create a design. The environment in which this is done today, consists of the participants office spaces, completed with equipment such as drawing tables, coffee machines, fax machines, CAD stations, etc. None of these elements reflect the existence of the (temporary) community that a design partner participates in. In this workshop paper we propose that the current two-dimensional desktop metaphor in a computer does not adequately support collaborative design. The typical 2D-desktop multiple open windows with different applications gives a fractured view of the design project in which by contrast the designer as a person conceives of himself as a whole. Moreover, the sense of place, or a consistent identity in which the design takes place is also lacking. The notion of _virtual environmentsŃ can assist in further developing design support for collaborative design in the future, as is sketched in the following outline.
series other
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id ecaade2013_096
id ecaade2013_096
authors Achten, Henri
year 2013
title Buildings with an Attitude
source Stouffs, Rudi and Sariyildiz, Sevil (eds.), Computation and Performance – Proceedings of the 31st eCAADe Conference – Volume 1, Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, 18-20 September 2013, pp. 477-485
wos WOS:000340635300050
summary In order to achieve interactive architecture it is necessary to consider more than the technological components of sensors, controllers, and actuators. The interaction can be focused to different interaction activities: instructing, conversing, manipulating, and exploring (we propose to call this the interaction view). Additionally, the purpose of the building may range from performing, sustaining, servicing, symbolising, to entertaining (we propose to call this the world view). Combined, the interaction view and world view establish 20 different attitudes, which are flavours of behaviour for the interactive building. Through attitudes interaction profiles can be established and criteria derived for the design of interactive buildings.
keywords Interactive architecture; design theory; Human-Computer Interaction; augmented reality; mixed reality.
series eCAADe
email achten@fa.cvut.cz
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id 9c0c
authors Af Klercker, Jonas and HenrichsČn, Jan
year 2001
title Can simulations in VE support architects in solving complex design problems?
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 77-82 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary Building design is facing development of industrialization of the production on the one hand and more complex 'One of a Kind' products on the other. This will be for rebuilding of a large stock of existing buildings and what can be left to new production. In both cases the results of the design process have to be solid to guarantee a successful product. In both cases an integrated and careful design process is absolutely crucial. The demands on the built environment make the systems of buildings more and more complex and have to be handled by a lot of different expertise. To avoid the 'Relay Race' of today the design teams of tomorrow must work much more integrated. To make integrated solutions, which means simultaneous constrains on all systems, the experts of different fields have to understand more of how all engaged systems relate and influence each other. Communication then consists of complex situations and processes that have to be understood and related to reality. In this aspect a multidimensional Virtual Environment interface has advantages and has been successfully used in design processes in other industries. In this paper the problems that have to be studied are for example Methodical, Conceptual, Technical and Process economical.
series other
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id 678e
authors Aish, Robert
year 1986
title Three-dimensional Input and Visualization
source Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [CAAD Futures Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-408-05300-3] Delft (The Netherlands), 18-19 September 1985, pp. 68-84
summary The aim of this chapter is to investigate techniques by which man-computer interaction could be improved, specifically in the context of architectural applications of CAD. In this application the object being designed is often an assembly of defined components. Even if the building is not actually fabricated from such components, it is usually conceptualized in these terms. In a conventional graphics- based CAD system these components are usually represented by graphical icons which are displayed on the graphics screen and arranged by the user. The system described here consists of three- dimensional modelling elements which the user physically assembles to form his design. Unlike conventional architectural models which are static (i.e. cannot be changed by the users) and passive (i.e. cannot be read by a CAD system), this model is both 'user generated' and 'machine readable'. The user can create, edit and view the model by simple, natural modelling activities and without the need to learn complex operating commands often associated with CAD systems. In particular, the user can view the model, altering his viewpoint and focus of attention in a completely natural way. Conventional computer graphics within an associated CAD system are used to represent the detailed geometry which the different three-dimensional icons may represent. In addition, computer graphics are also used to present the output of the performance attributes of the objects being modelled. In the architectural application described in this chapter an energy- balance evaluation is displayed for a building designed using the modelling device. While this system is not intended to offer a completely free-form input facility it can be considered to be a specialist man-machine interface of particular relevance to architects or engineers.
series CAAD Futures
email Robert.Aish@bentley.com
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ecaade2013_297
id ecaade2013_297
authors Aish, Robert
year 2013
title DesignScript: Scalable Tools for Design Computation
source Stouffs, Rudi and Sariyildiz, Sevil (eds.), Computation and Performance – Proceedings of the 31st eCAADe Conference – Volume 2, Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, 18-20 September 2013, pp. 87-95
wos WOS:000340643600008
summary Design computation based on data flow graph diagramming is a well-established technique. The intention of DesignScript is to recognise this type of data flow modeling as a form of ‘associative’ programming and to combine this with the more conventional ‘imperative’ form of programming into a single unified computational design application. The use of this application is intended to range from very simple graph based exploratory ‘proto-programming’ as used by novice end-user programmers to multi-disciplinary design optimisation as used by more experienced computational designers.
keywords Graph; scripting; associative; imperative.
series eCAADe
email Robert.Aish@Autodesk.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id 6d7d
id 6d7d
authors Aken, J. van
year 2001
title DOMAIN INDEPENDENT DESIGN THEORY
source Achten, H.H., de Vries, B. and Hennessey, J. (eds). Design Research in the Netherlands 2000, 9-17
series book
type normal paper
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl
more http://www.designresearch.nl/PDF/DRN2000_vanAken.pdf
last changed 2005/10/12 13:32

_id ddss9802
id ddss9802
authors Akin, O., Aygen, Z., Cumming, M., Donia, M., Sen, R. and Zhang, Y.
year 1998
title Computational Specification of Building Requirements in theEarly Stages of Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary We have been exploring computational techniques to help building designers to specify design requirements during the early stages of design. In the past, little has been accomplished in this area either in terms of innovative computational technologies or the improvement of design performance.The prospect of improving design productivity and creating a seamless process between requirements specification and formal design are our primary motivations. This research has been conducted as partof a larger project entitled SEED (Software Environment to Support Early Phases in Building Design). SEED features an open-ended modular architecture, where each module provides support for a design activity that takes place in early design stages. Each module is supported by a database to store and retrieve information, as well as a user interface to support the interaction with designers. The module described in this paper, SEED-Pro (the architectural programming module of SEED), is a workingprototype for building design requirements specification. It can be used by other modules in SEED or by design systems in other domains, such as mechanical engineering, civil engineering, industrial designand electrical engineering. Our approach to SEED-Pro is divided into two phases: core, and support functionalities. The core functionalities operate in an interactive mode relying on a case-based approach to retrieve and adapt complex specification records to the problem at hand. The supportfunctionalities include the case-base, the data-base, and the standards processing environment for building specification tasks. Our findings indicate that SEED-Pro: (1) is a tool that structures the unstructured domain of design requirements; (2) enables the integration of design requirements with the rest of the design process, (3) leads to the creation of complex case-bases and (4) enables the observation of their performance in the context of real world design problems.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ddss9401
id ddss9401
authors Akin, Omer
year 1994
title Psychology of Early Design in Architecture
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary Lately there has been a good deal of emphasis on the early stages of the design process, particularly by developers of computer aids and quantitative design models for both evaluation and generation of designs in a variety of domains. Yet, there is little understanding of the early design-process. While the early design process as manifested by human designers need not be the sole basis of the description of this phase, it certainly represents and important kernel of knowledge, especially for those who are interested in developing models, systems or merely interfaces for such systems. This paper focuses on the characterization of the psychology of the early design phase in architecture. It is described in terms of the general design strategies and problem solving tactics used; and is contrasted against some of the process characteristics that
series DDSS
email oaO4+@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddssar0202
id ddssar0202
authors Akin, Ömer and Özkaya, Ipek
year 2002
title Models of Design Requirement
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Case studies show that significant proportions of design errors and failures are linked to poor requirement specification during both early stages of design and as changes occur. Computational requirements engineering as a front-end to design iterations is a promising area addressing theseproblems. In other design disciplines, such as in software engineering, requirement engineering has given significant product improvements. In this paper, we present a state-space representation of requirement models for architectural design. The purpose of requirement modeling in design is tocreate a process by which requirements can be converted into working design solutions through frontend validation. We suggest three models of requirement specification, co-evolutionary [CoM], multiple domain [MDM] and single domain [SDM] models, that can facilitate this effort. Taken together all three models provide a full set of logical permutations of requirement-solution “worlds” and “operations.” We compare each model against the others in terms of facilitating change management and computability.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ecaade2013_235
id ecaade2013_235
authors Akküçük, Zeynep and Özkar, Mine
year 2013
title Ruling Im/Material Uncertainties
source Stouffs, Rudi and Sariyildiz, Sevil (eds.), Computation and Performance – Proceedings of the 31st eCAADe Conference – Volume 2, Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, 18-20 September 2013, pp. 305-314
wos WOS:000340643600031
summary Visual rules are powerful in loosely capturing the impact of material behavior on form in designer’s hands-on experimentation. They present a first step to translate the causal relations between material and form to computation without sacrificing the uncertainties in the designer’s interaction with the materials. This study investigates how to model the relation between material and form with visual rules so that the model embodies some of the phenomenological aspects of reality, rather than merely reproducing it.
keywords Digital materiality; physics-based modeling; abstractions; visual schemas; shape studies.
series eCAADe
email zeynepakkucuk@gmail.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id ddssar0214
id ddssar0214
authors Al Hassan, F., Trum, H.M.G.J. and Rutten, P.G.S.
year 2002
title Strategic Briefing A Conceptual Process Model for Building Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Nowadays building design problems are divided in partial discipline related sub-problems. Through targeted and focused attention to sub problems however the awareness of the whole is lost. Each designparticipant gives his sub-problem first priority. In contrast in the past the master builder saw the whole problem as his problem first. Thus the process of seeing the design problem as a whole, as a result ofprioritizing, considering constraints, or strategizing, is lost in today’s practice, basically because this process is a mental and implicit process, that occurred in the brain of the multi-disciplinary master builder.In most cases it is the task of no one in a design team today. The aim of this paper is modeling this conceptual mental implicit process design using System Theory and Cognitive Psychology, trying to determine the structure of the design problem as it occurs intuitively in the brain. The result will provide us with a mechanism that enables us each time to refine a unique common design problem representation. This leads to more effective use of design team capabilities, and forms an essential basis for organizing efforts toward collaborative solutions. Also some kind of clarity is provided as to how proposed solutions are to be judged.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

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