CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 61

_id ascaad2016_031
id ascaad2016_031
authors Amireh, Omar; Manal Ryalat and Tasbeeh Alaqtum
year 2016
title Narrative Architectural Fiction in Mentally Built Environments
source Parametricism Vs. Materialism: Evolution of Digital Technologies for Development [8th ASCAAD Conference Proceedings ISBN 978-0-9955691-0-2] London (United Kingdom) 7-8 November 2016, pp. 283-294
summary A thin line lies between reality and fiction; what is mentally imagined and what is visualized. It all depends on how ideas and images are perceived or what neurological activity is triggered in the user’s brain. Architects and designers spare no effort or tools in presenting buildings, architecture or designs in all forms or ways that would augment users’ experience whether on the perceptual or the cognitive level and in both the digital or the physical environments. In a progressive tendency they, the designers, tend to rely more and more on digitizing their vision and mission, which subsequently give them, impressive and expressive superiority, that would influence the users conscious on the one hand and manipulate their subconscious on the other. Within that process designers work hard to break any mental firewall that would prevent their ideas from pervading the space of any mental environment the user, build or visualize. In that context, to what extent such ways of mental entertainments used by architects, legitimize deception in design? What distinguishes employing the rhythmic simulation of the narrative fictional inceptions (virtual reality) from deploying the adaptive stimulation of the experience modeling conceptions. The difference between planting an idea and constructing an idea. It is not the intention of the paper to prove the failure of the computer aided design neither to stand against the digital architectural design media and applications development. It is rather to present a different way of understanding of how architectural design whether virtual, digital, or real can stimulates and induces codes and messages that is correlated to the brainwave cognitive attributes and can generate a narrative brain environment where the brain can construct and simulate its own fictional design. Doing so, the paper will review certain experimental architectural events and activities which integrate sound and sight elements and effects within some electronic, technical and digital environments.
series ASCAAD
email amireh@ju.edu.jo
last changed 2017/05/25 11:33

_id caadria2006_513
id caadria2006_513
authors BIMAL BALAKRISHNAN, LOUKAS N. KALISPERIS, KATSUHIKO MURAMOTO, GEORGE H. OTTO
year 2006
title MULTIMODAL VIRTUAL REALITY ENVIRONMENT FOR ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN (RE)PRESENTATION
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 513-519
summary The diversity of representations and the complexity of capturing and communicating the design process and its rationale present a challenge to architects. This paper proposes a multimodal virtual reality environment (MVE) aimed at utilizing the inherent advantages of distinct media, as opposed to a stand-alone virtual reality environment. Virtual reality is seen here as one of the tools in the larger milieu of interactive multimedia tools available to architects. The theoretical framework underlying its development explores the role of digital tools in the design process, their adaptability to existing workflow and issues of representation and perception, especially how design ideas are represented, evaluated and manipulated in the mind. The development of MVE followed a cycle of design, usability studies by a focus group and redesign.
series CAADRIA
email bimalbal@psu.edu, lnk@psu.edu, kxm15@psu.edu, george-otto@psu.edu
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id aef9
authors Brown, A., Knight, M. and Berridge, P. (Eds.)
year 1999
title Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [Conference Proceedings]
source eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7 / Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, 773 p.
summary The core theme of this book is the idea of looking forward to where research and development in Computer Aided Architectural Design might be heading. The contention is that we can do so most effectively by using the developments that have taken place over the past three or four decades in Computing and Architectural Computing as our reference point; the past informing the future. The genesis of this theme is the fact that a new millennium is about to arrive. If we are ruthlessly objective the year 2000 holds no more significance than any other year; perhaps we should, instead, be preparing for the year 2048 (2k). In fact, whatever the justification, it is now timely to review where we stand in terms of the development of Architectural Computing. This book aims to do that. It is salutary to look back at what writers and researchers have said in the past about where they thought that the developments in computing were taking us. One of the common themes picked up in the sections of this book is the developments that have been spawned by the global linkup that the worldwide web offers us. In the past decade the scale and application of this new medium of communication has grown at a remarkable rate. There are few technological developments that have become so ubiquitous, so quickly. As a consequence there are particular sections in this book on Communication and the Virtual Design Studio which reflect the prominence of this new area, but examples of its application are scattered throughout the book. In 'Computer-Aided Architectural Design' (1977), Bill Mitchell did suggest that computer network accessibility from expensive centralised locations to affordable common, decentralised computing facilities would become more commonplace. But most pundits have been taken by surprise by just how powerful the explosive cocktail of networks, email and hypertext has proven to be. Each of the ingredients is interesting in its own right but together they have presented us with genuinely new ways of working. Perhaps, with foresight we can see what the next new explosive cocktail might be.
series eCAADe
email andygbp@liv.ac.uk, mknight@liv.ac.uk, p.berridge@liverpool.ac.uk
more http://www.ecaade.org
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id sigradi2009_749
id sigradi2009_749
authors Cardoso, Daniel Ribeiro; Daniel Lenz Costa Lima; André Nogueira Paes de Paula Rodrigues
year 2009
title Design de uma poiesis [Design of a poiesis]
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary This article seeks an adequate manner to stand for a generative process in architecture. The processes of typology development in a vernacular architecture is adopted. As a proper cultural object, a type is perceived as a general principle of creation, a supra-individual mechanism. In that context, there are some issues concerning the research problem: how to adequately represent a poiesis? The related theories to support this research development are distinct. However, the theoretical framework point out shape grammar as a base for generative process representation in architecture. A generative system that operates with the same generative logic is proposed.
keywords architecture; generative grammar; generative process; modeling
series SIGRADI
email danielcardoso@ufc.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id 0dc3
authors Chambers, Tom and Wood, John B.
year 1999
title Decoding to 2000 CAD as Mediator
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 210-216
summary This paper will present examples of current practice in the Design Studio course of the BDE, University of Strathclyde. The paper will demonstrate an integrated approach to teaching design, which includes CAD among other visual communication techniques as a means to exploring design concepts and the presentation of complex information as part of the design process. It will indicate how the theoretical dimension is used to direct the student in their areas of independent study. Projects illustrated will include design precedents that have involved students in the review and assessment of landmarks in the history of design. There will be evidence of how students integrate DTP in the presentation of site analysis, research of appropriate design precedents and presentation of their design solutions. CADET underlines the importance of considering design solutions within the context of both our European cultural context and of assessing the environmental impact of design options, for which CAD is eminently suited. As much as a critical method is essential to the development of the design process, a historical perspective and an appreciation of the sophistication of communicative media will inform the analysis of structural form and meaning in a modem urban context. Conscious of the dynamic of social and historical influences in design practice, the student is enabled "to take a critical stand against the dogmatism of the school "(Gadamer, 1988) that inevitably insinuates itself in learning institutions and professional practice.
keywords Design Studio, Communication, Integrated Teaching
series eCAADe
email j.b.wood@strath.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 42eb
authors Chastain, Th., Kalay, Y.E. and Peri, C.
year 2002
title Square peg in a round hole or horseless carriage? Reflections on the use of computing in architecture
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 237-248
summary We start with two paradigms that have been used to describe the relationship of computation methods and tools to the production of architecture. The first is that of forcing a square peg into a round hole –– implying that the use of a tool is misdirected, or at least poorly fits the processes that have traditionally been part of an architectural design practice. In doing so, the design practice suffers from the use of new technology. The other paradigm describes a state of transformation in relationship to new technology as a horseless carriage in which the process is described in obsolete and `backward' terms. The implication is that there is a lack of appreciation for the emerging potentials of technology to change our relationship with the task. The paper demonstrates these two paradigms through the invention of drawings in the 14th Century, which helped to define the profession of architecture. It then goes on to argue that modern computational tools follow the same paradigms, and like drawings, stand to bring profound changes to the profession of architecture as we know it.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id ad51
authors Chastain, Th., Kalay, Y.E. and Peri, Ch.
year 1999
title Square Peg in a Round Hole or Horseless Carriage? Reflections on the Use of Computing in Architecture
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 4-15
summary We start with two paradigms that have been used to describe the relationship of computation methods and tools to the production of architecture. The first is that of forcing a square peg into a round hole — implying that the use of a tool is mis-directed, or at least poorly fits the processes that have traditionally been part of an architectural design practice. In doing so, the design practice suffers from the use of new technology. The other paradigm describes a state of transformation in relation-ship to new technology as a horseless carriage in which the process is described in obsolete and ‘backward’ terms. The impli-cation is that there is a lack of appreciation for the emerging potentials of technology to change our relationship with the task. The paper demonstrates these two paradigms through the invention of drawings in the 14th century, which helped to define the profession of Architecture. It then goes on to argue that modern computational tools follow the same paradigms, and like draw-ings, stand to bring profound changes to the profession of architecture as we know it.
series ACADIA
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id ecaade2010_078
id ecaade2010_078
authors Chiu, Yun-Ying
year 2010
title How To Make The Soft Skin?: A preliminary framework for the parametric design of the bionic soft skin
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.237-242
summary This paper is a presentation of the preliminary framework for the design and fabrication of the soft-skin. Today, the digital technology applied in the architecture field is everywhere. However, there are still lots of fantastic free form architecture uncompleted and remained on the paper architecture or only the digital visual simulated model. Until now, most of the finished free form cases are consisted of the skin and bones, or only the bones. The complete soft-skin cases without the bones are fewer and the process remains untold. Based on the parametric environments and biology, how might you design a free form without the bones? How could you make the soft skin stand up? The research starts a series of exploration of the design and fabrication for the soft skin, and seeks to propose the preliminary framework as a helpful reference for the designers who deal with the soft skin project.
wos WOS:000340629400025
keywords Soft skin; Bionic architecture; Parametric design; Grasshopper
series eCAADe
email blacka43@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id acadia16_440
id acadia16_440
authors Clifford, Brandon
year 2016
title The McKnelly Megalith: A Method of Organic Modeling Feedback
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 440-449
summary Megalithic civilizations held tremendous knowledge surrounding the deceivingly simple task of moving heavy objects. Much of this knowledge has been lost to us from the past. This paper mines, extracts, and experiments with this knowledge to test what applications and resonance it holds with contemporary digital practice. As an experiment, a sixteen-foot tall megalith is designed, computed, and constructed to walk horizontally and stand vertically with little effort. Testing this prototype raises many questions about the relationship between form and physics. In addition, it projects practical application of such reciprocity between architectural desires and the computation of an object’s center of mass. This research contributes to ongoing efforts around the integration of physics-based solvers into the design process. It goes beyond the assumption of statics as a solution in order to ask questions about what potentials mass can contribute to the assembly and erecting of architectures to come. It engages a megalithic way of thinking which requires an intimate relationship between designer and center of mass. In doing so, it questions conventional disciplinary notions of stasis and efficiency.
keywords rapid prototyping, design simulation, fabrication, computation, megalith
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email brandon@matterdesignstudio.com
more admin
last changed 2016/10/24 12:18

_id 4983
authors Cutting-Decelle, A.-F., Dubois, A.-M. and Fernandez, I.
year 1997
title Management and Integration of Product Information in Construction: Reality and Future Trends
source The Int. Journal of Construction IT 5(2), pp. 19-46
summary For many years numerous efforts have been spent on the development of standardized approaches for modelling industrial information. During this period stand-alone software tools have been developed in most industries including the Building and Construction sector : Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools, technical software such as software development for energy analysis, project management systems, product databases etc. As this set of computer tools became more and more heterogeneous, the need for communication tools has emerged to enable data to be exchanged between them. Standardising data exchange then becomes a logical step in the improvement of the information management during the whole construction process. The aim of this paper is to put forward the state-of-the art in the domain of product model approaches and standards developments : ISO 10303 STEP, ISO 13584 P-LIB and ISO 15531 MANDATE. We will give a global overview of the existing applications in the construction sector, both in terms of product, or process models, most of them provided by either national or European projects.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id ddss9426
id ddss9426
authors Duijvestein, Kees
year 1994
title Integrated Design and Sustainable Building
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary In the international student-project "European Environmental Campus 91 TU Delft Dordrecht" 20 students from 13 European countries worked in september 1991, during three weeks on "EcologicalSketches for the Island of Dordrecht". They worked on four different scales: the region isle of Dordt / the district Stadspolders / the neighbourhood I the house and the block. The environmentaltheme's Energy, Water, Traffic & Noise, Landscape & Soil were together with spatial analyses combined with the different scales. This combination was organised following the scheme mentioned below. The characters stand for the students. During the first period they worked in research groups, during the last period more in design groups. For instance: student L works in the beginning with the students B, G and Q in the research group water. In the last period sheworks with K, M, N and 0 in the design group Neighbourhood. Those students worked earlier in the other research-groups and contribute now in the design-group their thematic environmental knowledge. The results were presented to the Dordrecht council, officials and press. In the next project in september and october 1993 we started earlier with the design groups. Ten Dutch and ten "Erasmus" students worked for six weeks on proposals for the Vinex location Wateringenthe Hague. Each morning they worked in the research groups each afternoon in the design groups. The research groups used the EcoDesign Tools, small applications in Excel on Apple Macintoshto quantify the environmental pressure.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9427
id ddss9427
authors Engelen, Guy and White, Roger
year 1994
title A Strategic Planning and Policy Decision Support Tool for Urban Regions
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary In this paper we present a Decision Support System developed to assist urban designers, planners and policy makers to explore and evaluate possible urban layouts and their growth patterns. Thecore of the system consists of a modelling shell allowing the user to specify cellular automata based models of urban and regional systems. These models capture the effect of local spatial processes in which the use, or desired use of each parcel or cell of land is determined partly by institutional and environmental factors, and partly by the activities present in its neighbourhood. Since each cell affects every other cell within its neighbourhood, a complex dynamic emerges. Unlike conventional cellular automata, the models are defined with a large neighbourhood --over a hundred cells-- a relatively large number of states --more than a dozen in some applications-- representing socio-economic and natural land-uses. The approach permits the straightforward integration of detailed physical, environmental, and institutional constraints, as well as including the effects of the transportation and communication infrastructure. These models thus permit a very detailed representation of evolving spatial systems. The current version of the system represents urban areas as consisting of up to 10.000 interacting zones, each roughly the size of an individual city block. These models are easy to build and apply, yet empirical tests show that they produce realistic simulations of urban land use dynamics. Consequently, they are well suited to form the heart of the DSS, which provides the user with a number of tools for exploration,analysis and evaluation of alternative futures of the system as they result from policy interventions that are imposed by means of what-if experiments and scenario analysis. For example, the DSS isable to identify areas in which pressure for change in land use restrictions may become critical under particular development strategies. In the DSS, the modelling shell is coupled to a simple,custom-built GIS. In the stand-alone application of the DSS, this stores the detailed geographical qualities of the area being modelled, and allows basic overlay manipulations. It also displays theresults of the model while the simulation proceeds. Alternatively, the GIS can serve as aninterface to more elaborate, commercial GIS systems.
series DDSS
email rwhite@kean.ucs.mun.ca
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id caadria2015_233
id caadria2015_233
authors Fernando, Ruwan and Robin Drogemuller
year 2015
title Recapitulation in Generating Spatial Layouts
source Emerging Experience in Past, Present and Future of Digital Architecture, Proceedings of the 20th International Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2015) / Daegu 20-22 May 2015, pp. 199-207
summary The noted 19th century biologist, Ernst Haeckel, put forward the idea that the growth (ontogenesis) of an organism recapitulated the history of its evolutionary development. While this idea is defunct within biology, the idea has been promoted in areas such as education (the idea of an education being the repetition of the civilizations before). In the research presented in this paper, recapitulation is used as a metaphor within computer-aided design as a way of grouping together different generations of spatial layouts. In most CAD programs, a spatial layout is represented as a series of objects (lines, or boundary representations) that stand in as walls. The relationships between spaces are not usually explicitly stated. A representation using Lindenmayer Systems (originally designed for the purpose of modelling plant morphology) is put forward as a way of representing the morphology of a spatial layout. The aim of this research is not just to describe an individual layout, but to find representations that link together lineages of development. This representation can be used in generative design as a way of creating more meaningful layouts which have particular characteristics. The use of genetic operators (mutation and crossover) is also considered, making this representation suitable for use with genetic algorithms.
keywords Generative Design, Lindenmayer Systems, Spatial Layouts
series CAADRIA
email ruwan.fernando@gmail.com
last changed 2015/06/05 05:14

_id ecaade2013_028
id ecaade2013_028
authors Fricker, Pia; Girot, Christophe and Munkel, Georg
year 2013
title How to Teach ‘New Tools’ in Landscape Architecture in the Digital Overload
source Stouffs, Rudi and Sariyildiz, Sevil (eds.), Computation and Performance – Proceedings of the 31st eCAADe Conference – Volume 2, Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, 18-20 September 2013, pp. 545-553
summary The central theme of the paper is the introduction of hands-on tools showing the integration of information technology within a postgraduate study program (MAS LA) for landscape architects. What has already become a part of the discourse in the field of architecture – generic design – is now also finding more resonance in the context of large-scale landscape architectural design. If one studies the educational backgrounds of landscape architects, however, they often do not match the same standard as those of architects. A solid background in the area of innovative use of information technology, especially computer-assisted design and CAD/CAM construction is only at a preliminary state at most universities. The critical arguments in the choice of the selected medium and the building up of a continuous digital chain stand here in the forefront. The aim is not to improve the quality of the landscape design based on the variety of the applied tools, but rather through the sensible use of the said. Reflections as well as questions of method and theory stand at the forefront of our efforts. 
wos WOS:000340643600055
keywords Design tool development; computational design research and teaching; new design concepts and strategies; parametric and evolutionary design.
series eCAADe
email fricker@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id c2f9
id c2f9
authors Friedrich E, Derix C and Hannah S
year 2007
title Emergent Form from Structural Optimisation of the Voronoi Polyhedra Structure
source Proceedings of the Generative Arts conference, Milan, 2007
summary In the course of the exploration of computational means in the architectural design process, in order to investigate more complex, adaptive geometries, the Voronoi diagram has recently gained some attention, being a three-dimensional space-filling structure which is modular but not repetitive. The project looks at the Voronoi diagram as a load-bearing structure, and whether it can be useful for structural optimisation. Hereby the edges of the Voronoi polyhedra are regarded as structural members of a statical system, which then is assessed by structural analysis software. Results seem to indicate that the Voronoi approach produces a very specific structural as well as spatial type of order. Through the dislocation of the Voronoi cells, the statical structure becomes more complex through emergent topology changes, and the initially simple spatial system becomes much more complex thorough emerging adjacencies and interconnections between spaces. The characteristics of the emerging form, however, lie rather in the complexity how shifted spaces and parts are fitted together, than in a radical overall emergent geometry. Spatially as well as a structurally, the form moves from a simple modular repetitive system towards a more complex adaptive one, with interconnected parts which cannot stand alone but rather form an organic whole.
keywords complex geometry, emergence, adaptive topology, voronoi diagram
series other
type normal paper
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2012/09/20 16:25

_id d9bf
authors Goodchild, N.F., Steyaert, L.T., Parks, B.O., Johnson, C., Maidment, D., Crane, M. and Glendinning, S. (Eds.)
year 1996
title GIS and Environmental Modeling: Progress and Research Issues
source Fort Collins, CO: GIS World Books, pp.451-454
summary GIS and Environmental Modeling: Progress and Research Issues Michael F. Goodchild, Louis T. Steyaert, Bradley O. Parks, Carol Johnston, David Maidment, Michael Crane, and Sandi Glendinning, Editors With growing pressure on natural resources and landscapes there is an increasing need to predict the consequences of any changes to the environment. Modelling plays an important role in this by helping our understanding of the environment and by forecasting likely impacts. In recent years moves have been made to link models to Geographical Information Systems to provide a means of analysing changes over an area as well as over time. GIS and Environmental Modeling explores the progress made to date in integrating these two software systems. Approaches to the subject are made from theoretical, technical as well as data stand points. The existing capabilities of current systems are described along with important issues of data availability, accuracy and error. Various case studies illustrate this and highlight the common concepts and issues that exist between researchers in different environmental fields. The future needs and prospects for integrating GIS and environmental models are also explored with developments in both data handling and modelling discussed. The book brings together the knowledge and experience of over 100 researchers from academic, commercial and government backgrounds who work in a wide range of disciplines. The themes followed in the text provide a fund of knowledge and guidance for those involved in environmental modelling and GIS. The book is easily accessible for readers with a basic GIS knowledge and the ideas and results of the research are clearly illustrated with both colour and black and white graphics.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id sigradi2009_636
id sigradi2009_636
authors Hernández, Patricia; Verón; Mengo; Figueroa; Carmigiani; D´alessandro y Lanzone y Swendsen Arquitectos
year 2009
title Microarquitectura - Equipo Domotizado para Exhibicion en Librería [Micro-architecture - Domotized Equipment for Bookstore Display]
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary The working team is comprised of professionals and students from Engineering and Architecture degree courses. This group, participating at a certified research by Secretaría de Ciencia y Técnica de la Nación, have agreed to carry out a joint designing experience about a micro-architecture prototype to be domotized by the Chair of Automation of Mechanical Engineering.We have designed a display equipment for local bookstores. The equipment in itself is ductile and useful to build a stand. It can be easily coupled and divided into modules for shop windows and different spaces within stores. It is changeable, flexible, and its arrangement is dynamic. The design contemplates general sample functions according to the various sizes of the product, which range from small to large-scale objects.The equipment offers its own domotic features.
keywords domótica; exhibición; ambientalismo; interdisciplina; gráfica 3D animada
series SIGRADI
email arqhernandezster@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id acadia03_018
id acadia03_018
authors Kalay, Yehuda E. and Jeong, Yongwook
year 2003
title Collaborative Design Process Simulation Game
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 133-141
summary Collaboration is an important aspect of the architect’s education. However, it is not amenable to the traditional project-based learning pedagogy that works so well for developing form-making skills. Being a process, rather than a product, it cannot be revealed by judging the results alone, which is often how form-making skills are taught and judged. Rather, the process of collaboration is only evident when the number of the participants exceeds a certain threshold, and when actions taken by other participants affect an individual’s on-going design decisions. The advent of on-line, multi-player simulation games provides an analogy and an opportunity to explore interactive collaborative design pedagogies. Their abstract nature helps focus attention on the core issues of the simulated phenomenon, while the playful nature of a game, as opposed to “work,” encourages immersion and role playing that contribute to the learning process. This paper describes an on-line game for simulating the design collaboration process. It espouses to simulate, exercise, and provide a feel for the social dimension of collaboration, by embedding mutual dependencies that encourage players to engage each other—in adversarial or collaborative manners—to accomplish their goals. Specifically, it is intended to help students understand what collaboration is, why it is necessary, and how it is done. The game is modeled after popular board games like Scrabble and Monopoly: players build “houses” made of colored cubes on a site shared with other players. Actions taken by one player immediately affect his/her neighbors. A carefully constructed set of rules awards or deducts points for every action taken by a player and by his/her neighbors. The rules were constructed in such a manner that players who collaborate (in a variety of ways) stand to gain more points than those who do not. The player with the most points “wins.”
series ACADIA
email ywjeong@uclink.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id caadria2003_c5-3
id caadria2003_c5-3
authors Kalay, Yehuda E. and Jeong, Yongwook
year 2003
title Collaborative Design Simulation Game
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 745-758
summary Collaboration is an is an important aspect of the architect's education. However, it is not amenable to the traditional project-based learning pedagogy that works so well for developing form-making skills, because it can only be revealed when the number of participants exceed a certain threshold, and when actions made by others affect the individual's design decisions. The advent of on-line, multi-player games provides an opportunity to explore interactive collaborative design pedagogies. Their abstraction helps focus attention on the core issues of the simulated phenomenon, while the playful nature of a game, as opposed to 'work,' encourages immersion and role playing that contribute to the learning process. This paper describes an on-line game for simulating design collaboration. It espouses to simulate, exercise, and provide a feel for the social dimension of collaboration, by embedding mutual dependencies that encourage players to engage each other-in adversarial or collaborative manner-to accomplish their goals. Specifically, it is intended to help students understand what is collaboration, why it is necessary, and how it is done. The game is modeled after popular board games like Scrabble and Monopoly: players build 'houses' made of colored cubes on a site shared with other players.' A carefully constructed set of rules awards or deducts points for every action taken by a player or by his/her neighbors. The rules were constructed in such a manner that players who collaborate (in a variety of ways) stand to gain more points than those who do not. The player with the most points 'wins.'
series CAADRIA
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id ijac20031407
id ijac20031407
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.; Jeong, Yongwook
year 2003
title A Collaborative Design Simulation Game
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 4
summary Collaboration is an is an important aspect of the architect's education. However, it is not amenable to the traditional project-based learning pedagogy that works so well for developing form-making skills, because it can only be revealed when the number of participants exceed a certain threshold, and when actions made by others affect the individual's design decisions. The advent of on-line, multi-player games provides an opportunity to explore interactive collaborative design pedagogies. Their abstraction helps focus attention on the core issues of the simulated phenomenon, while the playful nature of a game, as opposed to 'work,' encourages immersion and role playing that contribute to the learning process. This paper describes an on-line game for simulating design collaboration. It espouses to simulate, exercise, and provide a feel for the social dimension of collaboration, by embedding mutual dependencies that encourage players to engage each other - in adversarial or collaborative manner - to accomplish their goals. Specifically, it is intended to help students understand what is collaboration, why it is necessary, and how it is done. The game is modeled after popular board games like Scrabble and Monopoly: players build 'houses' made of colored cubes on a site shared with other players.' A carefully constructed set of rules awards or deducts points for every action taken by a player or by his/her neighbors. The rules were constructed in such a manner that players who collaborate (in a variety of ways) stand to gain more points than those who do not. The player with the most points 'wins.'
series journal
email kalay@socrates.Berkeley.edu
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

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