Search Results

Hits 41 to 60 of 96

_id avocaad_2001_15
id avocaad_2001_15
authors Henri Achten, Jos van Leeuwen
year 2001
title Scheming and Plotting your Way into Architectural Complexity
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The problem of complexity underlies all design problems. With the advent of CAD however, our ability to truly represent complexity has increased considerably. Following the four waves of design methodology as distinguished by Cross (1984), we see changing architectural design attitudes with respect to complexity. Rather than viewing it as problematic issue, designers such as Koolhaas, van Berkel, Lynn, and Franke embrace complexity and make it a focus in their design work. The computer is an indispensable instrument in this approach. The paper discusses the current state of the art in architectural design positions on complexity and CAAD, and reflects in particular on the role of design representations in this discussion. It is advanced that a number of recent developments are based on an intensified use of design representations such as schema’s, diagrams, and interactive modelling techniques. Within the field of possibilities in this field, the authors discuss Feature-Based Modelling (FBM) as a formalism to represent knowledge of the design. It is demonstrated how the FBM approach can be used to describe graphic representations as used in design, and how other levels and kinds of design knowledge can be incorporated, in particular the less definite qualitative information in the early design phase. The discussion section concludes with an extrapolation of the current role of design representation in the design process, and advances a few positions on the advantage and disadvantage of this role in architectural design.
series AVOCAAD
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 8919
authors Horowitz, Ellis
year 1984
title Fundamentals of Programming Languages---2nd. ed
source xv, 446 p. : ill. Rockville, Maryland: Computer Science Press, Inc., 1984. includes bibliography: p. 421-433 and index. -- (computer software engineering series)
summary Includes such topics as variables, expressions, statements, typing scope, procedures, data types, exception handling and concurrency. By understanding these concepts and how they are realized in different programming language, the reader is provided with a framework for understanding future language design and a level of comprehension far greater then one gets by writing different programs in different languages
keywords programming, languages, education
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:08

_id e799
authors Howes, Jaki
year 1986
title Computer Education in Schools of Architecture and the Needs of Practice
source Teaching and Research Experience with CAAD [4th eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Rome (Italy) 11-13 September 1986, pp. 45-48
summary In April 1985 there was a meeting (at Huddersfield Polytechnic) or representatives from 26 Schools of Architecture. At this, concern was expressed about the lack of direction from the RIBA with regard to the appropriate level of computer teaching on architectural courses. In addition, it was felt that it was essential that at least one member of a Visiting Board panel should be computer literate and in a position to give advice. These points were raised at the RIBA Computer Committee later in 1985, and the committee's attention was also drawn to comments contained in the report by HM Inspector on Public Sector Education in Architecture (1985) based on investigations made during 1984.
series eCAADe
email j.howes@lmu.ac.uk
last changed 1998/08/23 08:30

_id e0a3
authors Johnson, Robert E.
year 1984
title Computer-Aided Energy Economics for Early Concept Design Analysis
source Building Economics, International Symposium Proceedings (3rd : Canada). 1984? vol. 3: pp.46-57 : ill. includes bibliography
summary Decisions that have the greatest impact on energy cost performance are made very early in the design process. The problem is that these early design decisions are rarely tested thoroughly until very late in design. Usually this is due to the difficulties inherent in the use of the more sophisticated analysis procedures. Hourly energy computer simulations are costly to use, often require detailed input preparation, and use large ''main-frame' computers. Easier to use energy evaluation tools such as manual calculations and simplified computer programs do not yield reliable results. This is particularly true when passive solar design solutions are being tested. However, even the sophisticated approaches often have a limited ability to comprehensively model the economic implications of the more accurate energy simulations. This paper is intended to describe efforts at the University of Michigan to develop a more integrated approach to the assessment of energy economics - one that may be used at the earliest stages of concept design. The approach taken has been to concentrate on developing interactive, easy to use computer programs to describe building design proposals. This computer-generated building model is then used to automatically generate the information required to run a large, sophisticated energy analysis program developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (BLAST). Total life cycle cost analysis is performed either using procedures within BLAST or an 'electronic spreadsheet' system. Perceived deficiencies in the current state of this energy/cost evaluation system are described, and future research directions are presented
keywords architecture, energy, analysis, CAD, economics, design, methods
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id 40d6
authors Johnson, Robert E.
year 1984
title The Integration of Economic Analysis and Computer-based Building Models
source CIB W-65 Symposium. July, 1984. [19] p. : ill. includes bibliography
summary Most current methods used to evaluate the economics of building designs are inadequate in that they focus on the evaluation of completed designs and do not assist in the development and creation of designs. They are used after most major design decisions have been made. This paper describes the first year of a two year research project (funded by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Government) which seeks to integrate economic analysis techniques into design decision-making within the context of an interactive computer-aided architectural and engineering design system. Issues reviewed include the current state of computer software, existing economic analysis models and existing economic analysis software. A conclusion is reached that most economic analysis systems fall into the category of single purpose software and are not adaptable to the wide range of idiosyncratic evaluation models used in real estate, architecture, engineering, construction and building management. Objectives are proposed for a general purpose, interactive cost modeling system that is integrated with a geometric computer-based building model. Initial experiments with a prototype of this system at various stages of the design-construction-use process are discussed. Further development of this system as a research tool for exploring alternative economic modeling procedures is presented
keywords analysis, evaluation, CAD, architecture, design, methods, economics, integration
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 4eaf
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.
year 1984
title A Database Management Approach to CAD/CAM Systems Integration
source December, 1984. 13 p. : ill. includes bibliography
summary Facilitating the communication between different CAD/CAM systems is rapidly becoming an important issue, as more systems reach the market. A solution to the communication problem can be found if it is considered part of the more general problem of managing the complex information associated with the representation of physical artifacts and environments in the memory of computers, thereby accounting for the operators that are used for accessing the data as well as the data itself. Database management systems have provided powerful solutions to information management problems in a variety of disciplines and enjoy a broad and rigorous research foundation. If the techniques, methods and systems that were developed for database management could be utilized for CAD/CAM integration, they would save a considerable duplication of effort, enhance the integrity of the data, and bring to bear the results and advances that have been achieved over a long period of hard work
keywords CAD, CAM, relational database, integration, architecture
series CADline
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id caadria2004_k-1
id caadria2004_k-1
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.
year 2004
title CONTEXTUALIZATION AND EMBODIMENT IN CYBERSPACE
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 5-14
summary The introduction of VRML (Virtual Reality Markup Language) in 1994, and other similar web-enabled dynamic modeling software (such as SGI’s Open Inventor and WebSpace), have created a rush to develop on-line 3D virtual environments, with purposes ranging from art, to entertainment, to shopping, to culture and education. Some developers took their cues from the science fiction literature of Gibson (1984), Stephenson (1992), and others. Many were web-extensions to single-player video games. But most were created as a direct extension to our new-found ability to digitally model 3D spaces and to endow them with interactive control and pseudo-inhabitation. Surprisingly, this technologically-driven stampede paid little attention to the core principles of place-making and presence, derived from architecture and cognitive science, respectively: two principles that could and should inform the essence of the virtual place experience and help steer its development. Why are the principles of place-making and presence important for the development of virtual environments? Why not simply be content with our ability to create realistically-looking 3D worlds that we can visit remotely? What could we possibly learn about making these worlds better, had we understood the essence of place and presence? To answer these questions we cannot look at place-making (both physical and virtual) from a 3D space-making point of view alone, because places are not an end unto themselves. Rather, places must be considered a locus of contextualization and embodiment that ground human activities and give them meaning. In doing so, places acquire a meaning of their own, which facilitates, improves, and enriches many aspects of our lives. They provide us with a means to interpret the activities of others and to direct our own actions. Such meaning is comprised of the social and cultural conceptions and behaviors imprinted on the environment by the presence and activities of its inhabitants, who in turn, ‘read’ by them through their own corporeal embodiment of the same environment. This transactional relationship between the physical aspects of an environment, its social/cultural context, and our own embodiment of it, combine to create what is known as a sense of place: the psychological, physical, social, and cultural framework that helps us interpret the world around us, and directs our own behavior in it. In turn, it is our own (as well as others’) presence in that environment that gives it meaning, and shapes its social/cultural character. By understanding the essence of place-ness in general, and in cyberspace in particular, we can create virtual places that can better support Internet-based activities, and make them equal to, in some cases even better than their physical counterparts. One of the activities that stands to benefit most from understanding the concept of cyber-places is learning—an interpersonal activity that requires the co-presence of others (a teacher and/or fellow learners), who can point out the difference between what matters and what does not, and produce an emotional involvement that helps students learn. Thus, while many administrators and educators rush to develop webbased remote learning sites, to leverage the economic advantages of one-tomany learning modalities, these sites deprive learners of the contextualization and embodiment inherent in brick-and-mortar learning institutions, and which are needed to support the activity of learning. Can these qualities be achieved in virtual learning environments? If so, how? These are some of the questions this talk will try to answer by presenting a virtual place-making methodology and its experimental implementation, intended to create a sense of place through contextualization and embodiment in virtual learning environments.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
last changed 2004/05/20 16:37

_id f59d
authors Koelbl, R., Bruntsch, St. and Knoflacher, H.
year 2003
title Perspective Vienna – A Comparison of Planning Scenarios and Real Development
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary With the suspension of national boarders in unions of nations, cities and their regions gain in significance for the economic, social and cultural development. This is particularly valid for Vienna, which lies close to the eastern boarder of the European Union, which should fall with the enlargement of EU in the near future. Of prominent importance is therefore to obtain a comprehensive understanding between proposed and defined aims for an urban development, the related measures and their extent ofimplementations and their actual or real effects. This paper attempts to give a strategic analysis of the Viennese urban and traffic development programs, from 1962, 1972, 1984 and 1994, on the one hand, and the data analysis of the statistical year books beginning from 1960 until 2000, on the other. The results show that adjustments have been made not only in response to certain trends, but also to a change of philosophy of urban development. It can be seen that certain assumptions of, for example, economic and transport measures can have the opposite outcome in relation to the intended objectives. Hence, one main question remains to beanswered: How should Vienna deal with the challenges ahead, to secure and foster a sustainable development under such circumstances on a long-term basis. In this respect, some measures are given, which should make it possible to overcome successfully these challenges.
series other
email stefan.bruntsch@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2003/03/11 19:39

_id ebcc
authors Kolb, David A.
year 1984
title Experiential Learning
source Prentice Hall
summary In his book Experiential Learning: Experience as the Source of Learning and Development (1984), David Kolb introduces his experiential learning theory and provides a model for its application in schools, organizations, and virtually anywhere people are gathered together. Kolb's comprehensive and practical theory builds on the rich foundations of experience-based learning provided by John Dewey, Kurt Lewin, and Jean Piaget. We first consider the roots of his theory following which we offer a summary of it in practice.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ab9c
authors Kvan, Thomas and Kvan, Erik
year 1999
title Is Design Really Social
source International Journal of Virtual Reality, 4:1
summary There are many who will readily agree with Mitchell's assertion that "the most interesting new directions (for computer-aided design) are suggested by the growing convergence of computation and telecommunication. This allows us to treat designing not just as a technical process... but also as a social process." [Mitchell 1995]. The assumption is that design was a social process until users of computer-aided design systems were distracted into treating it as a merely technical process. Most readers will assume that this convergence must and will lead to increased communication between design participants, that better social interaction leads to be better design. The unspoken assumption appears to be that putting the participants into an environment with maximal communication channels will result in design collaboration. The tools provided, therefore, must permit the best communication and the best social interaction. We see a danger here, a pattern being repeated which may lead us into less than useful activities. As with several (popular) architectural design or modelling systems already available, however, computer system implementations all too often are poor imitations manual systems. For example, few in the field will argue with the statement that the storage of data in layers in a computer-aided drafting system is an dispensable approach. Layers derive from manual overlay drafting technology [Stitt 1984] which was regarded as an advanced (manual) production concept at the time many software engineers were specifying CAD software designs. Early implementations of CAD systems (such as RUCAPS, GDS, Computervision) avoided such data organisation, the software engineers recognising that object-based structures are more flexible, permitting greater control of data editing and display. Layer-based systems, however, are easier to implement in software, more familiar to the user and hence easier to explain, initially easier to use but more limiting for an experienced and thoughtful user, leading in the end to a lesser quality in resultant drawings and significant problems in output control (see Richens [1990], pp. 31-40 for a detailed analysis of such features and constraints). Here then we see the design for architectural software faithfully but inappropriately following manual methods. So too is there a danger of assuming that the best social interaction is that done face-to-face, therefore all collaborative design communications environments must mimic face-to-face.
series journal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2003/05/15 08:29

_id 2885
authors Lansdown, J. and Maver, T.W.
year 1984
title CAD in Architecture and Building
source Computer Aided Design, Vol 16, No 3
summary CAAD tool have gradually come into use in architecture over the past years. Appraisal and evaluation of designs and design tools and the preparation of product innovations are discussed. Types of visualisation and flexible layout programs for CAAD are assessed. The areas which knowledge-based design systems should cover are discussed .
series journal paper
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/06/10 13:55

_id 4b27
authors Lansdown, John
year 1984
title Knowledge for Designers
source Architect`s journal. England: February, 1984. vol. 179: pp. 55-58
summary The first of two articles discussing expert systems. Both design and construction are carried out within the framework of empirical rules and regulations designed more for ease of implementation and checking than scientific validity. On completion of a building, little follow up research is done on the way it is used or on the way in which the assumption made in its design are borne out in practice. This present two problems: How to make information from disparate sources easily available to designers and constructors, and how to make them aware that they need this information. This paper describes how a special type of computer programming might assist in solving these problems
keywords design, construction, building, expert systems, knowledge base, systems, programming, life cycle
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:09

_id eacf
authors Lantz, Keith A. and Nowicki, William I.
year 1984
title Structured Graphics for Distributed Systems
source ACM Transactions on Graphics January, 1984. vol. 3: pp. 23-51 : ill.
summary includes bibliography: pp. 48-51. One of the most important functions of an intelligent workstation is to provide a state-of-the-art user interface to distributed resources. One aspect of such an interface is virtual terminal support for both local and remote applications with a range of requirements, including graphics. To ensure good response for remote applications in particular, the bulk of user interaction must be handled local to the workstation. Therefore, the terminal management software on the workstation must provide object modeling as well as viewing facilities, in contrast to most contemporary graphics systems. One way of doing this is to support structured display files. It is equally important to support simultaneous access to multiple applications ; thus the terminal management software must provide window system facilities. Lastly, since the terminal management software should present a common interface to both local and remote applications, the workstation itself should be regarded as a multifunction component of the distributed system and not strictly as a terminal or a personal computer. This paper presents the system architecture and protocols necessary to achieve these goals and evaluates an existing implementation
keywords user interface, windowing, computer graphics, programming
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id 5c07
authors Lee, H.-L., Liu, Y.-T., Chen, S.-C., Tang, S.-K. and Huang, C.-P., Huang, C.-H., Chang, Y.-L., Chang, K.-W. and Chen, K.-Y.
year 2002
title A Comparative study of protocol analysis for - Spatiality of a Text-based Cyberspace
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 262-266
summary Graduate Institute of Architecture, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 30050, TAIWAN The adaptation of the word cyberspace (Gibson, 1984) following the emergence of the World Wide Web Internet not only succinctly revolutionized the correlation of time and space but also poised to challenge how we view the existing spatial concept. This research tries to use protocol analysis to examine text-based cyberspace, such as bulletin board, chart rooms and so forth, and the objective of this research is to realize the spatiality of cyberspace through the cognitive point of view, and to compare the differences of the definitions and perception ways of spatiality between people with general domain and in design fields. Finally, we validate the existence of cyberspace, where the process not only allows further categorization of spatial elements concluded from the earlier study, but discover that varied backgrounds can affect how a user defines and perceives cyberspace (Strate, 1999).
series eCAADe
email aleppo@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 88e0
authors Lee, Y.T., De Pennington, P. and Shaw, N.K.
year 1984
title Automatic Finite- Element Mesh Generation from Geometric Models : A Point Based Approach
source ACM Transactions on Graphics. October, 1984. vol. 3: pp. 287-311 : ill. includes bibliography
summary A novel algorithm for automatic finite-element mesh generation is described. It uses constructive solid geometry to provide the geometric data for the object to be meshed. The geometric definition of the object and a value for the required mesh density are the only inputs. The method consists of two stages: point generation and mesh construction over the points. It has been implemented in two dimensions and is capable of generating predominantly 'good' quadrilateral elements. Triangular elements are only created in circumstances under which quadrilateral elements are not feasible
keywords solids, geometric modeling, finite elements, analysis, CSG
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 4af9
authors Levy, Henry
year 1984
title VAXstation : A General-Purpose Raster Graphics Architecture
source ACM Transactions on Graphics. January, 1984. vol. 3: pp. 70-83 : ill. includes bibliography
summary A raster graphics architecture and a raster graphics device are described. The graphics architecture is an extension of the RasterOp model and supports operations for rectangle movement, text writing, curve drawing, flood, and fill. The architecture is intended for implementation by both closely and loosely coupled display subsystems. The first implementation of the architecture is a remote raster display connected by fiber optics to a VAX minicomputer. The device contains a separate microprocessor, frame buffer, and additional local memory: it is capable of executing raster commands on operands in local memory or VAX host memory
keywords hardware, computer graphics, technology
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:09

_id 05b4
authors Liang, You-Dong and Barsky, Brian A.
year 1984
title A New Concept and Method for Line Clipping
source ACM Transactions on Graphics. January, 1984. vol. 3: pp. 1-22 : ill. includes bibliography
summary A new concept and method for line clipping is developed that describes clipping in an exact and mathematical form. The basic ideas form the foundation for a family of algorithms for two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and four-dimensional (homogeneous coordinates) line clipping. The line segment to be clipped is mapped into a parametric representation. From this, a set of conditions is derived that describes the interior of the clipping region. Observing that these conditions are all of similar form, they are rewritten such that the solution to the clipping problem is reduced to a simple max/min expression. For each dimension, the mathematics are discussed, an example is given, the algorithm is designed, and a performance test is conducted. The new algorithm is compared with the traditional Sutherland-Cohen clipping algorithm. Using randomly generated data, the new algorithm showed a 36 percent, 40 percent, and 79 percent improvement for two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and four- dimensional clipping, respectively. One of the advantages of this algorithm is the quick rejection of line segments that are invisible. In addition, this algorithm can be easily generalized for clipping against any convex viewing volume
keywords algorithms, clipping, computer graphics, analysis
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 8c95
authors Liu, Clive K.
year 1984
title Drawings as Models for Design: A Computer Drawing System to Build Models Supporting Design Process through Abstractions
source Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh
summary A general design process can be characterized by the sequence of defining various abstract objects used to represent the artifact. For example, designers use various abstractions (dclined as abstrnct objects), such as graphs, polygons, etc., to represent the artifact. As design evolves, these abstract objects will be transformed into a definition (eg. of a building) detailed enough to allow manufacturing and to determine that the result will perform as desired. This thesis is concerned with providing a computer drawing system that could support various abstractions in the design process and allow various representations of the design to be processed and interpreted. A precise drawing contains not only the shape information, but also conveys many topological and geometric relations that its elements must hold to correspond to the arbfact in reality. For many operations during design, one wants these type of relations to be maintained. Other than the drawing being an iconic model, these relations are the semantics of the drawing and, if embedded in the drawing, imbue it with many characteristics of a symbolic model. Current CAD systems have no or limited mechanisms for embedding such relations in a drawing. It is my intent to demonstrate that drawings, especially for shape (both topologV and geometry) information, can be defined as various abstract objects during design process. Therefore, drawings are used as models to represent the artifact. When a model is manipulated, relations defined in the model are maintained.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 8dce
authors Manna, Zohare and Waldinger, Richard
year 1984
title The Logical Basis for Computer Programming : Deductive Reasoning
source 2 v. : ill Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co., 1984. vol.1: includes bibliography v.1 p.: [579]-581 and index. -- CADLINE has vol. 1 only. (Addison-Wesley Series in Computer Science)
summary An introduction to the basic notions of propositional and predicate logic and special theories including integers, strings, trees, lists, sets, and tuples (arrays). Algorithms are expressed not as explicit programs but as the definitions of functions and relations within these theories
keywords logic, programming, AI, reasoning
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id ca27
id ca27
authors Martens, Bob and Peter, Herbert
year 2004
title ARCHICAD - BEST PRACTICE: THE VIRTUAL BUILDING™ REVEALED
source Springer Publishers, Vienna/NewYork (ISBN 3-211-40755-3)
summary ArchiCAD has been on the market since 1984 and has firmly established itself among the available CAD software packages. The number of ArchiCAD users continues to increase and has already exceeded 100.000 by far. Continuous product development has broadened the program’s possible spectrum of work applications. Therefore, this book provides comprehensive (background) information and descriptions of the many tools, functions and processes, that explain and document their many practical, research and educational uses.
keywords CAD-software package, Virtual Building
series book
type normal paper
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
more http://www.springer.at/main/book.jsp?bookID=3-211-40755-3&categoryID=0
last changed 2004/08/17 10:34

For more results click below:

show page 0show page 1this is page 2show page 3show page 4