Search Results

Hits 1 to 4 of 4

_id 4df8
authors Hanna, R., Barber T. and Qaqish, R.
year 1997
title Computers as the Sole Design Tool: The Mackintosh Experiment
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary This paper reports on the findings of an empirical investigation into the use of the computer as the only design media in solving a design problem. Several 1st and 2nd year students took part in a two week experiment on the use of a CAD programme, AutoCAD 13 and AEC 5.0, to design a studio for a graphic designer.

Prior to the experiment an extensive literature search was carried out to explore the relationship between the design process, visual thinking, conventional sketching (interactive imagery) and Computer Aided Design. Out of this search a number of design variables were identified, developed and then tested through a series of observations and interviews with the students while they were engaged in the design of the Graphic Designer’s Studio. Questionnaires were also administered to students to explore their views on issues including, using CAD instead of conventional tools, design areas where CAD is most effective, and how CAD can improve design skills.

series eCAADe
email gtca09@udcf.gla.ac.uk
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/hanna/hanna.htm
last changed 2001/08/17 13:11

_id 8804
authors QaQish, R. and Hanna, R.
year 1997
title A World-wide Questionnaire Survey on the Use of Computers in Architectural Education
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary The paper reports on a study which examines the impact on architectural education needs arising from the changes brought about by the implications of CAD teaching/learning (CAI/CAL). The findings reflect the views of fifty-one (51) architecture schools through a world-wide questionnaire survey conducted in mid 1996. The survey was structured to cover four continents represented by seven countries, namely the USA, UK, Israel, Australia, Canada, Sweden and the Netherlands. Structurally the main findings of this study are summarised under five areas, namely: 1) General Information, 2) Program of Study (curriculum) and CAD course, 3) CAD Laboratories: Hardware, Software, 4) Departmental Current and Future Policies, 5) Multi-media and Virtual Reality. Principally, there were three main objectives for using the computers survey. Firstly, to accommodate a prevalent comprehension of CAD integration into the curriculum of architecture schools world wide. Secondly, to identify the main key factors that control the extent of association between CAD and architectural curriculum. Thirdly, to identify common trends of CAD teaching in Architecture schools world-wide and across the seven countries to establish whether there are any association between them. Several variables and factors that were found to have an impact on AE were examined, namely: the response rate, the conventional methods users and the CAD methods users amongst students, CAD course employment in the curriculum, age of CAD employment, the role of CAD in the curriculum, CAD training time in the Curriculum, CAD laboratories/Hardware & Software, computing staff and technicians, department policies, Multi-Media (MM) and Virtual-Reality (VR). The statistical analysis of the study revealed significant findings, one of which indicates that 35% of the total population of students at the surveyed architecture schools are reported as being CAD users. Out of the 51 architecture schools who participated in this survey, 47 have introduced CAD courses into the curriculum. The impact of CAD on the curriculum was noted to be significant in several areas, namely: architectural design, architectural presentation, structural engineering, facilities management, thesis project and urban design. The top five CAD packages found to be most highly used across universities were, namely, AutoCAD (46), 3DStudio (34), Microstation (23), Form Z (17), ArchiCAD (17). The findings of this study suggest some effective and efficient future directions in adopting some form of effective CAD strategies in the curriculum of architecture. The study also serves as an evaluation tool for computing teaching in the design studio and the curriculum.

 

keywords CAD Integration, Employment, Users and Effectiveness
series eCAADe
email r.qaqish@gsa.ac.uk
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/qaqish/qaqish.htm
last changed 2001/08/17 13:11

_id ab09
authors Qaqish, Ra’ed and Hanna, Raid
year 1997
title The Impact of CAL Strategies on CAD
source CAADRIA ‘97 [Proceedings of the Second Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 957-575-057-8] Taiwan 17-19 April 1997, pp. 475-489
summary This paper reports on a two fold study, which examines the impact of CAL on CAD and architectural education, and evaluates the overall effectiveness and efficiency of CAD teaching and strategies in the curriculum of architecture. The study also examined the need for a framework within which the creation of a module for applying CAL in CAD to support the curriculum of architecture can be structured and assessed. The main concern of the study was to explore the range and balance of computer assisted activities in the design studio, and the interpretation of the various roles of the CAD tutor and his/her involvement in delivering these activities. In delivering these activities two criteria, namely: teaching methods and CAD integration (which are interchangeable and yet play different roles), can have a distinct effect on the implementation of CAL in the design studio. The case study evaluated and investigated the CAL the AEC course as part of the 3rd year design studio at Mackintosh School of Architecture, to determine to what extent the AEC learning events were effective in advocating new strategies in CAD. The methods of this investigation consisted of classroom observations and administrating questionnaires. Variables such as the group and gender differences/participation, the tutor’s confidence, level of administration and strategies to help with technical problems and motivations, also the task-related activities, tangibility of the learning materials, and the minutes of lesson have been examined. The global rating of the CAL events in CAD lessons, the CAL organisation and sequence, the level of students’ confidence, the rate of students’ interest, the mode of classroom, the level of learner performance and the relationship between CAL and the overall curriculum have also been empirically examined and their interdependent relationships explored. The findings of this study may help in establishing future directions in adopting some form of effective CAL strategies in CAD. The study also serves as an evaluation tool for computing teaching in the design studio. Furthermore, the checklist used in this case study may also be used in evaluating the different courses in CAD in the curriculum of architectural schools.
series CAADRIA
last changed 1999/02/01 14:21

_id ecaade2012_86
id ecaade2012_86
authors QaQish ; Ra’Ed K.
year 2012
title 15 Years of CAD Teaching in Jordan: How Much Has Been Accomplished? A Comparative Analysis of the Use of CAD in Architectural Schools Between 1997 and 2012
source Achten, Henri; Pavlicek, Jiri; Hulin, Jaroslav; Matejovska, Dana (eds.), Digital Physicality - Proceedings of the 30th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / ISBN 978-9-4912070-3-7, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Architecture (Czech Republic) 12-14 September 2012, pp. 23-32
summary The paper reports on a study which examines the evolution in architectural education trends arising from the changes brought about by both Socioeconomic Factors and the implications of CAAD in the last 15 years in Jordanian universities. The findings reflect the views of thirteen (13) architecture faculties/schools through a nation-wide questionnaire survey conducted in the spring of 2012. The survey was structured to cover both private and public universities in Jordan, represented by faculties of engineering, architecture and design. Structurally, the main fi ndings of this study are summarized under six areas, namely: 1) General Students’ Information, 2) Demographic and Socioeconomic Factors, 3) CAD Competences amongst both Staff and Students, 4) Program of Study and CAD Courses, 5) Overall Satisfaction of CAD Courses and Training , 6) CAD and Social Networks. The majority of student respondents were females (144) (53.3%). The top laptop brands used were HP (17%) Toshiba (12.2%) and Dell (7.8%). The CAD packages found to be most highly used throughout universities were AutoCAD, 3D Max, Sketch-up, and Adobe Suite. The importance of new technologies, electronic book, and the social network aspects in enhancing CAD and 3D modeling software integration with the design studio was affi rmed yet no relationship to the gender was noted.
wos WOS:000330320600001
keywords CAD Integration, Socioeconomic Factors
series eCAADe
email qaqish@aum.edu.jo
last changed 2014/04/14 11:07

No more hits.