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_id 5bce
authors Ceccato, Cristiano
year 1999
title Evolutionary Design Tools for Mass-Customisation
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 152-156
summary This paper describes an instance of the author’s ongoing research in the field of Generative Design. The work is based on the premise that computer-aided design (CAD) should evolve beyond its current limitation of one-way interaction, and become a dynamic, intelligent, multi-user environment that encourages creativity and actively supports the evolution of individual, mass-customised designs which exhibit common features. The understanding of fundamental shape-forming processes in nature inspires us to move beyond the existing CAD paradigms and re-examine the way we can benefit from the computers in design. We can use this knowledge to create a new generation of computer-based design tools which use evolutionary search algorithms to generate create a common family of individual designs optimised according to particular criteria, while supporting our design intuition. The author explores this idea by illustrating a research project between the Hong Kong Polytechnic University and Deakin University (Australia). The project implements a multi-user oriented design tool for evolutionary design, which was tailored to produce a simple object such as door handle. The paper first gives a short historical and philosophical to the work, then describes the technical and algorithmic requirements, and implementation of the system. It concludes by describing an experiment in which the system was used on a "live" test group of people to generate individual, mass-customised designs.
series SIGRADI
email sdchris@polyu.edu.hk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id 0dc3
authors Chambers, Tom and Wood, John B.
year 1999
title Decoding to 2000 CAD as Mediator
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 210-216
summary This paper will present examples of current practice in the Design Studio course of the BDE, University of Strathclyde. The paper will demonstrate an integrated approach to teaching design, which includes CAD among other visual communication techniques as a means to exploring design concepts and the presentation of complex information as part of the design process. It will indicate how the theoretical dimension is used to direct the student in their areas of independent study. Projects illustrated will include design precedents that have involved students in the review and assessment of landmarks in the history of design. There will be evidence of how students integrate DTP in the presentation of site analysis, research of appropriate design precedents and presentation of their design solutions. CADET underlines the importance of considering design solutions within the context of both our European cultural context and of assessing the environmental impact of design options, for which CAD is eminently suited. As much as a critical method is essential to the development of the design process, a historical perspective and an appreciation of the sophistication of communicative media will inform the analysis of structural form and meaning in a modem urban context. Conscious of the dynamic of social and historical influences in design practice, the student is enabled "to take a critical stand against the dogmatism of the school "(Gadamer, 1988) that inevitably insinuates itself in learning institutions and professional practice.
keywords Design Studio, Communication, Integrated Teaching
series eCAADe
email j.b.wood@strath.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 69f5
authors Chan, C., Maves, J. and Cruz-Neira, C.
year 1999
title An Electronic Library for Teaching Architectural History
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 335-344
summary This research project developed an electronic library of significant buildings chosen to represent seven selected periods of Western architectural history: Egyptian (Mortuary temple of Queen Hatshepsut), Greek (Parthenon), Roman (Pantheon), Romanesque (Speyer Cathedral), Gothic (Notre Dame Cathedral), Renaissance (Tempietto), and Modern (Des Moines Art Center). All buildings were reconstructed in their original or intended forms based on plans, drawings, photographs, and historical texts. Two products were generated by this project: (1) materials to be displayed on the World Wide Web, including rendered still images for perception, movies for a visual guide, and Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) models for user navigation; and (2) virtual reality (VR) models to be displayed in the C2 (an improved version of the Cave Automatic Virtual Environment or CAVE facility). The benefits of these VR models displayed on the Web and in the C2 are their easy accessibility at any time from various geographic locations and the immersive experience that enhances viewersÌ understanding of the effects of spatial proportions on form and of colors on materials.
series CAADRIA
more http://archvr.design.iastate.edu/miller
last changed 2000/01/13 11:23

_id ad51
authors Chastain, Th., Kalay, Y.E. and Peri, Ch.
year 1999
title Square Peg in a Round Hole or Horseless Carriage? Reflections on the Use of Computing in Architecture
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 4-15
summary We start with two paradigms that have been used to describe the relationship of computation methods and tools to the production of architecture. The first is that of forcing a square peg into a round hole — implying that the use of a tool is mis-directed, or at least poorly fits the processes that have traditionally been part of an architectural design practice. In doing so, the design practice suffers from the use of new technology. The other paradigm describes a state of transformation in relation-ship to new technology as a horseless carriage in which the process is described in obsolete and ‘backward’ terms. The impli-cation is that there is a lack of appreciation for the emerging potentials of technology to change our relationship with the task. The paper demonstrates these two paradigms through the invention of drawings in the 14th century, which helped to define the profession of Architecture. It then goes on to argue that modern computational tools follow the same paradigms, and like draw-ings, stand to bring profound changes to the profession of architecture as we know it.
series ACADIA
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id 90dc
authors Chen, C.
year 1999
title Information Visualisation and Virtual Environments
source Springer
summary Information Visualisation is a fast growing research field and an industry with tremendous potential. Virtual environments provide a unique medium for people to communicate and interact over computer networks. Information Visualisation and Virtual Environments links the two areas together and presents the latest research and development, highlighting the potential of information visualisation as an enabling technology in the design of new generations of virtual environments. This book will be an invaluable source of reference for courses in Information Visualisation, User Interface Design, Virtual Environments, HCI, and Information Retrieval, as well as being a useful resource for consultants and practitioners. The book contains 144 wonderful colour images of intriguing and influential works in information visualisation.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 1ea1
authors Cheng, Nancy Yen-wen
year 1999
title Digital Design at UO
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 4, p. 18
summary University of Oregon Architecture Department has developed a spectrum of digital design from introductory methods courses to advanced design studios. With a computing curriculum that stresses a variety of tools, architectural issues such as form-making, communication, collaboration,theory-driven design, and presentation are explored. During the first year, all entering students are required to learn 3D modeling, rendering, image-processing and web-authoring in our Introduction to Architectural ComputerGraphics course. Through the use of cross-platform software, the two hundred beginning students are able to choose to work in either MacOS or Windows. Students begin learning the software by ‘playing’ with geometric elements and further develop their control by describing assigned architectural monuments. In describing the monuments, they begin with 2D diagrams and work up to complete 3D compositions, refining their modelswith symbol libraries. By visualizing back and forth between the drafting and modeling modes, the students quickly connect orthogonal plans and sections with their spatial counterparts. Such connections are an essential foundation for further learning.
series ACADIA
email nywc@darkwing.uoregon.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 09:04

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 2690
authors Chiu, Mao-Lin
year 1999
title Design Navigation and Construction Simulation by Virtual Reality
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 31-41
summary This paper depicts the approach of constructing a virtual reality environment for simulating architectural design and construction operations. The virtual environment is established to demonstrate the spatial performance of design and constructability of construction operations. Particularly, the functions such as navigation of construction sites, simulation of construction operations, and evaluation of construction details will be critical to construction operations. The system shell is implemented by JAVA on the web and integrated with VRML for supporting the above functions. The study focuses on the needs for the system integration and interface design. Four modes of human computer interfaces are proposed, including the user, agent, monitor, and immersion modes. Finally, this paper provides demonstration of construction simulation in an office building project to highlight the above discussion. The operations of crane towers and curtain wall installation are also studied in the construction process. In conclusion, this paper demonstrates the potential uses and limitation of virtual reality in simulation of the built environment.
series CAADRIA
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2000/01/13 10:04

_id ga9904
id ga9904
authors Chupa, Anna
year 1999
title Generative Texture Maps for Animation (artwork and paper)
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary An aperiodic planar tiling is employed as the initial structure for texture application. A generative process for texture metamorphosis is used to create variation producing two-dimensional art work intended for printed output. Two-dimensional animations demonstrate the process for producing new textures. Expanding from this preliminary test, rules for opacity and relative depth, scale and velocity of movement will be related the length of time a form is visible on screen and geometric form. These are demonstrated in a two-dimensional animation that uses pictorial depth cues such as atmospheric perspective, occlusion, vertical placement, and diminishing size. Modification of rules take into consideration two underlying philosophical assumptions: 1) the world is created by a benevolent "god" and 2) aesthetic criteria govern issues related to selection of visual forms that persist.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 3db8
authors Clarke, Keith
year 1999
title Getting Started with GIS
source 2nd ed., Prentice Hall Series in Geographic Information Science, ed. Kieth Clarke. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1999, 2-3
summary This best-selling non-technical, reader-friendly introduction to GIS makes the complexity of this rapidly growing high-tech field accessible to beginners. It uses a "learn-by-seeing" approach that features clear, simple explanations, an abundance of illustrations and photos, and generic practice labs for use with any GIS software. What Is a GIS? GIS's Roots in Cartography. Maps as Numbers. Getting the Map into the Computer. What Is Where? Why Is It There? Making Maps with GIS. How to Pick a GIS. GIS in Action. The Future of GIS. For anyone interested in a hands-on introduction to Geographic Information Systems.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 9a1e
authors Clayton, Mark J. and Vasquez de Velasco, Guillermo
year 1999
title Stumbling, Backtracking, and Leapfrogging: Two Decades of Introductory Architectural Computing
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 151-158
summary Our collective concept of computing and its relevance to architecture has undergone dramatic shifts in emphasis. A review of popular texts from the past reveals the biases and emphases that were current. In the seventies, architectural computing was generally seen as an elective for data processing specialists. In the early eighties, personal computers and commercial CAD systems were widely adopted. Architectural computing diverged from the "batch" world into the "interactive" world. As personal computing matured, introductory architectural computing courses turned away from a foundation in programming toward instruction in CAD software. By the late eighties, Graphic User Interfaces and windowing operating systems had appeared, leading to a profusion of architecturally relevant applications that needed to be addressed in introductory computing. The introduction of desktop 3D modeling in the early nineties led to increased emphasis upon rendering and animation. The past few years have added new emphases, particularly in the area of network communications, the World Wide Web and Virtual Design Studios. On the horizon are topics of electronic commerce and knowledge markets. This paper reviews these past and current trends and presents an outline for an introductory computing course that is relevant to the year 2000.
keywords Computer-Aided Architectural Design, Computer-Aided Design, Computing Education, Introductory Courses
series eCAADe
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id d9d0
authors Cohen Egler, Tamara Tania
year 1999
title Río Digital (Digital Rio)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 478-481
summary RioDigital is a text situated on new forms of expression of knowledge over the city. It is a written multimedia whose objective is to place in disposability for the society the complexity of urban space on its multiple historical determinations, of its space, social and cultural forms. It is a research over the potentials of digital art to express the processes of constitution of social forms and constructions of urban space. The motion of works was in the sense of using this language to reconstitute and vivify the history of Rio de Janeiro city in the XX century. The city is an ensemble of symbols that encounters the language in its best form of presentation. The research identified visual documents as films, photos and maps that made possible to reconstruct processes of transformation, worked through the use of digital images technology that allows expression and turns move perceptible the transmission of this history. The digital image is certainly a possibility to represent urban reality. Through movement, illumination of image and of writing it was possible to express to process of construction and reconstruction of space building and social changes. We understand that the condition of citizen is associated with the feeling of belonging, which urban process every time move complex and difficult to understand, that new technologies can through synthesis, connectivity and interactivity expand the capacity of indivils to know the city and act positively with it. It is an intention to amplify the sense of belonging and encourage the action of transform.
series SIGRADI
email tamara@ippur.ufrj.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 5716
authors Cohen Egler, Tamara Tania
year 1999
title Cyberspace: New Forms of Social Interaction
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 253-258
summary The cyberspace becomes into news forms of communication that transform and expand interaction among men. The objective of our reflection is to understand how space-time relations are changed by the new technologies of communication and information. The starting point of this analysis is the historic dimension of production, interaction and appropriation of space-time processes, proceeding in the se of solving their contemporary forms defined by the growing technology of daily life. It is possible to notice how communication expands the interaction among companies, institutions and society because processes and procedures are publicized, reducing the disorder and uncertain. It is a way of making social complexities more accessible, more clear, being easier read by individuals so they are able to lead with the complex of opportunities and responsibilities that compound the social system. The fundamental constitution of cybernetic spaces is on its capacity of make accessible the processes of communication and information which expand the interaction eliminating intermediaries. The condition of material localization dissolves itself to give place tommunicative interaction. The essential of the question can be stated in the theory that explains that social practices are the result of a cognitive system. That statement send us to the heart of analysis over the importance of comprehending as a moment that precede the action. When societies can be read through a union of knowledge condensed all along their social and cultural development. The development of new technologies of communication and information make nations capable to produce, accumulate diffuse knowledge, conducting to an action of intelligent individuals who write the social development.
series SIGRADI
email tamara@ippur.ufrj.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 84e8
authors Cohen, J.M., Markosian, L., Zeleznik, R.C., Hughes, J.F. and Barzel, R.
year 1999
title An Interface for Sketching 3D Curves
source ACM Symposium on Interactive 3D Graphics, pp. 17-22 (April 1999). ACM SIGGRAPH. Edited by Jessica Hodgins and James D. Foley
summary The ability to specify nonplanar 3D curves is of fundamental importance in 3D modeling and animation systems. Effective techniques for specifying such curves using 2D input devices are desirable, but existing methods typically require the user to edit the curve from several viewpoints. We present a novel method for specifying 3D curves with 2D input from a single viewpoint. The user rst draws the curve as it appears from the current viewpoint, and then draws its shadow on the oor plane. The system correlates the curve with its shadow to compute the curve's 3D shape. This method is more natural than existing methods in that it leverages skills that many artists and designers have developed from work with pencil and paper.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id d0aa
authors Colajanni, Benedetto, Concialdi, Salvatore and Pellitteri, Giuseppe
year 1999
title CoCoMa: a Collaborative Constraint Management System for the Collaborative Design
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 364-369
summary Collaborative Design is a topic of particular current interest. Existing software allows a multiplicity of designers to work on the same project. What the software really allows is accessing to a part of the information of the project and changing it. Sometimes there is a hierarchical distribution of the power of change: some participants can be permitted to operate only on some limited layers of the object representation. In this case the changes they propose are to be accepted by a general manager of the design process. What is lacking in this kind of software is the explicit management on the reciprocal constraints posed by different participants. In this paper, an elementary Collaborative Design System is presented whose main concern is just the management of constraints. Each participant designs the part of the project of his/her concern instantiating objects comprised of geometric description, alphanumeric variables and constraints on both. Constraints can be of two types: absolute or defined by a range of allowed values of the constrained variable. A participant intervening later can accept the constraint, choosing a value in the permitted range, or decide to violate it. In this case the proposed violation is signalled to whom posed it.
keywords Collaborative Design, Design Process, Management System, Participant Designs, Constraints Violation
series eCAADe
email bcolajan@unipa.it, ciesse@neomedia.it, pellitt@unipa.it
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id de50
authors Combes, Leonardo and Barrionuevo, Luis F.
year 1999
title Distribución Espacial de Elementos Arquitectónicos (Space Distribution of Architectural Elements)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 130-133
summary This paper treats of the management of the position of objects on the plane. At first sight problems related with planning objects on the plane appear to be quite trivial. Nevertheless a system able to manage the permutation of objects the one with respect to the others becomes a complex one when all the possible variations are taken into account. The operations to be performed include topological variations in a combinatorial process. Although the results of such a system could be of general design application in this paper only architectural problems are examined as examples. In the first part an outline of the system is presented. In the second part a computer program directed to produce graphical results is described together with some case studies.
series SIGRADI
email labsist@herrera.unt.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 9cab
authors Coomans, M.K.D.
year 1999
title A Virtual Reality User Interface for a Design Information System, CCAI: the Journal for the Integrated Study of Artificial Intelligence
source Cognitive Science and Applied Epistemology, Rijks Universiteit Gent
summary The computer is a tool, a complex artefact that is used to extend our reach. A computer system can provide several kinds of services, but against these services stands a supplementary task that the user must deal with: the communication with the computer system. We argued that Virtual Reality (VR) can fundamentally improve the user interface by rendering on the common experiential skills of all users. We present the theoretical basis for this, referring to Donald Norman's theory. We show that VR provides at least theoretically, the means to take a big step in the direction of an ideal user interface. As an example of a innovative application of VR in user interface design, we presented the VR-DIS system; an interdisciplinary design system for the building and construction industry. We discuss the issues underlying the design of its VR interface.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 37d1
authors Corona Martíne, Alfonso and Vigo, Libertad
year 1999
title Before the Digital Design Studio
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 247-252
summary This paper contains some observations which derive from our work as Studio Professors . In the last years, studios are in a transition phase with the progressive introduction of computers in later stages of the design process. The initiative generally belongs to students rather than to studio masters, since the former are aware that a knowledge of CAD systems will make them able to get work in architects offices. It is the first few Studios that will guide the student in forming a conception of what is architecture . Therefore, we have observer more attentively the way in which he establishes his first competence as a designer. We believe it is useful to clarify design training before we can integrate computers into it. The ways we all learn to design and which we transmit in the Studio were obviously created a long time ago, when Architecture became a subject taught in Schools, no longer a craft to be acquired under a master. The conception of architecture that the student forms in his mind is largely dependent on a long tradition of Beaux-Arts training which survives (under different forms) in Modern Architecture. The methods he or she acquires will become the basis of his creative design process also in professional life. Computer programmes are designed to adapt into the stages of this design process simply as time saving tools. We are interested in finding out how they can become an active part in the creative process and how to control this integration in teaching. Therefore, our work deals mainly with the tradition of the Studio and the conditioning it produces. The next step will be to explore the possiblities and restrictions that will inevitably issue from the introduction of new media.
series SIGRADI
email freedom@cvtci.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 2524
authors Corrao, R. and Fulantelli, G.
year 1999
title The Web to Support Creative Design in Architecture
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 275-283
summary The use of the web in a didactic context appears to be extremely meaningful and effective. In Architecture, the web has huge potential: among others, it has the ability to gather an enormous amount of information, and the ability to create an active learning environment, one which affords the learner opportunities to engage and think. The paper reports on a Web Based Instruction (WBI) system developed at the Italian National Research Council -Institute for Educational and Training Technologies- to support design activities for students of the Italian Faculty of Architecture and Civil Engineering. Original features of the system allow students to study and design in an effective way. Specifically, a particular set of "virtual stationery items" has been implemented and integrated in the system to help students, enrolled on on-line courses, to mimic important traditional study activities, still gaining all the advantages of using the Web. These tools are integrated with communication tools in the same learning environment. A very important feature of the WBI system is that authorised users can enrich the information network in the system, by adding new pages and new links. In the paper we report on the structure of the system, with particular focus on the information domain. Some of the "working tools" which allow users to simulate traditional study activities and the hypertext extension mechanism are also described.
series AVOCAAD
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 85ab
authors Corrao, Rossella and Fulantelli, Giovanni
year 1999
title Architects in the Information Society: The Role of New Technologies
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 665-671
summary New Technologies (NTs) offer us tools with which to deal with the new challenges that a changing society or workplace presents. In particular, new design strategies and approaches are required by the emerging Information Society, and NTs offer effective solutions to the designers in the different stages of their professional life, and in different working situations. In this paper some meaningful scenarios of the use of the NTs in Architecture and Urban Design are introduced; the scenarios have been selected in order to understand how the role of architects in the Information Society is changing, and what new opportunities NTs offer them. It will be underlined how the telematic networks play an essential role in the activation of virtual studios that are able to compete in an increasingly global market; examples will be given of the use of the Web to support activities related to Urban Planning and Management; it will be shown how the Internet may be used to access strategic resources for education and training, and sustain lifelong learning. The aforesaid considerations derive from a Web-Based Instruction system we have developed to support University students in the definition of projects that can concern either single buildings or whole parts of a city. The system can easily be adopted in the other scenarios introduced.
keywords Architecture, Urban Planning , New Technologies, World Wide Web, Education
series eCAADe
email rcorrao@itdf.pa.cnr.it, fulantelli@itdf.pa.cnr.it
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

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